Courses

Curriculum

pdf iconBFA Curriculum for Industrial Design 2013-14   pdf iconMID Master of Industrial Design Curriculum 2013-14

 

Courses

Fall Semester 2013
  • ID-24ST

    ADVANCED DESIGN: STUDIO

    Credits: 6.00

    This 6-credit Advanced Design studio category offers juniors and seniors the opportunity to continue their focus on various curricular topics including innovative product design through production and fabrication; innovation through socially responsible, humanitarian and sustainable design; and innovation through science and technology. These studios are designed to strengthen the student's ability to conduct research, ideation, material exploration, presentation, and concept validation. The course develops student's ability and confidence towards professional practice and entrepreneurship within the industrial design field. This studio will meet two days per week.
    ID juniors and seniors are required to take a total of three advanced studios. A 6-credit course taken during Wintersession or in the summer cannot fulfill an Advanced Design studio credit unless pre-approved by the Department Head. Placement for an Advanced Design studio is assigned by lottery at the beginning of each semester.
    Major requirement; ID majors only, unless specified by the instructor and/or department head. Registration of Industrial Design department studio courses is not available via web registration. Some advanced studios have a fee for course supplies or field trips. The fee is announced during the department's registration lottery.
  • ID-2382

    BUSINESS PRINCIPLES: DESIGN AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP

    Credits: 3.00

    Turning an idea into a sustainable reality requires a fundamental understanding of business, but the frameworks that guide business principles overlap, complement, and enhance design principles.
    This course seeks to educate students to understand business as a critical design factor-- a defining constraint or liberating perspective?along the same lines that other design principles are taught.
    The guiding principle is that design and business are inextricably linked: ? Design work is intrinsically linked to business and will always be at the service of business, fulfilling the need for an enterprise (profit or non-profit) whose business model is critical to its survival * Design will find new channels, new outlets, through a more complete understanding of business needs and how businesses see opportunity * Design can and should be considered as critical strategic input for business
    The objective of Business Principles: Design and Entrepreneurship is for students to understand basic business vocabulary, to explore how design vocabulary and design processes overlap, complement and enhance business vocabulary, and to understand how design thinking skills can be used to identify and execute business opportunities.
    This course will consist of a series of lectures, readings and case studies from the Harvard Business School
    Major elective ID majors only
  • ID-2464

    DESIGN PRINCIPLES I

    Credits: 6.00

    This course is an introduction to conceptual and manual skills that represent necessary steps in design evolution. Students strengthen skills by completion of several processes and exercises. Critical thinking and concept generation is a primary focus, drawing and model making activities help to establish this process. Throughout the course each student will focus on improving communication skills and the ability to project or sell ideas.
    Estimated cost of materials: $15.00
    Major requirement; ID majors only
    Registration by Industrial Design department, course not available via web registration
  • ID-2477

    DESIGNING WITH RHINO

    Credits: 3.00

    In this course, you will use the NURBS modeling program Rhinoceros to develop 3D digital models and also produce photo realistic renderings of your designs. A variety of modeling techniques and geometry types will be explored with an emphasis on manufacturing ability and communicating design intent.
    You must have Rhino installed on a computer running Windows for the very first class. A choice of rendering plug-ins is available for Rhino and these options will be covered during the first class. Estimated cost of materials: $200.00
  • ID-2506

    DIGITAL PORTFOLIO

    Credits: 3.00

    This course will provide students with the necessary skills for preparing a digital portfolio for the web. Graphic layout/presentation, photo documentation, typeface, interface, content and editing will all be covered. Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign will be the core software packages utilized in addition to HTML, CSS, and basic Javascript for web production.
    Major elective; ID majors given preference, open to all
  • IDISC-1523

    FUTURE SCENARIOS: LIVING IN SPACE

    Credits: 3.00

    This course begins Summer 2013 and continues directly into the Fall 2013 semester. Students must participate in both segments of the course. Class Limit of 14 students from the following disciplines: Apparel, Interior Architecture, Furniture, ID and D+M.

    The summer research lab will meet three days a week for 4 weeks (week three will be one full week at Samsung, Seoul). This is a 3-credit course. All costs for travel, room and board will be provided for registered students. The unique individualism of each participant, different disciplines and approaches, will cultivate a wide variety of responses applied to a shared pursuit.

    Course Overview: This multi-disciplinary studio will use scenarios and vignettes to explore meaningful or emergent social behaviors, exchanges, emotional experiences and living spaces based upon sensing technologies that can interact, influence or redirect our senses to provide value and improve how we value our lives/living. Rarely have designers anticipated the full implications of new technologies on the larger culture, the lives of individuals, or the built environment. From the automobile and television to mobile phones and gene sequencers, initial functional intent represents only a small part of the total impact of new technology.

    In the interest of increasing the potential relevance and impact of new technological capabilities, this project will explore and map territories of linked social, cultural, psychological behavior. The objective of the investigation is to play, reveal, tweek, challenge, interrogate, interpret, abuse, and test the limits of our senses and our adaptive responses to the influence of new technologies.
  • ID-243G

    GRADUATE ID SEMINAR I

    Credits: 3.00

    This seminar will examine issues arising from the study of design history. It is the first in a two part seminar experience designed to establish a social and professional framework for the thesis project. With the guidance and support of the instructor, graduate students will survey the landscape of significant movements in design history, and discuss their relevance to current design challenges. The seminar serves the dual role of developing broader perspectives on the relevance of graduate study to a larger social context, and strengthening the frame of reference for the discourse in group critiques.
    Graduate major requirement; ID majors only
    Registration by Industrial Design department, course not available via web registration
  • ID-241G

    GRADUATE ID STUDIO I

    Credits: 12.00

    The execution of two assigned design projects provides the framework for a thorough examination of the design process. This structured and intensive studio will focus on the relationship between the implementation of sound design methodologies and successful problem solving in the design process. This first studio experience is intended to provide the methodological infrastructure for the remainder of the M.I.D. thesis experience.
    Graduate major requirement; ID majors only
    Registration by Industrial Design department, course not available via web registration
  • ID-247G

    GRADUATE ID STUDIO III

    Credits: 3.00

    The third studio experience in the MID program shifts further toward self-determined design direction for the student project work and constitutes the primary research component of the Thesis Project. It is at this time that students are required to assemble an advisory panel for their thesis work and outline the direction and schedule for the Thesis investigation.
    Graduate major requirement; ID majors only
    Registration by Industrial Design department, course not available via web registration
  • ID-245G

    ID GRADUATE SHOP ORIENTATION

    Credits: 3.00

    This course will acclimate new graduate students to the shop environment of the Industrial Design Department. The Metal, Wood and Model Shops are invaluable resources, clarifying pragmatic aspects of the design process from general feasibility of manufacturing to the challenges of translating concepts into tangible objects. This course covers excerpted information from both undergraduate courses Wood I and Metals I and emphasizes safety in the utilization of shop facilities.
    Graduate major requirement; ID majors only
    Registration by Industrial Design department, course not available via web registration
  • ID-2494

    INTRO TO SHOEMAKING

    Credits: 3.00

    Shoes are an everyday commodity; but do you know how many are steps involved? In this course, students will handcraft a basic pair of cemented construction shoes from start to finish. This includes beginning by creating a basic pattern, draping the last, cutting (clicking) the leather, sewing (closing) the upper, building a stacked leather heel, and finishing the sole. We will approach the requirements of constructing a shoe through choice of material, characteristics of leather, and how to utilize them in laying out the pattern. In the process of the construction from pattern to shoe, we will work with basic tools for handcrafted shoemaking including a shoemaker's knife, closers hammer, buff stick, lasting pincers to name a few. Students are expected to complete one pair of shoes and begin work on a second pair, applying and expanding upon the techniques learned in the class.
    Estimated Cost of Materials: $225.00
    ID majors only
    Also offered as APPAR 2494 for Apparel majors
  • ID-3054

    INVESTIGATING NORMAL

    Credits: 3.00

    Assistive technologies usually refer to prosthetics and medical aids: tools, devices, and other gear that either restore or augment the functioning of body parts. Historically, these have been designed for people with diagnosable disabilities. In this course, we look at medical as well as cultural tools that investigate the "normal" body and mind, and we design our own devices-high-tech, low-tech, digital or analog-with these ideas in mind. Through readings, site visits, guest speakers, and projects, we investigate both traditional and unusual prosthetics and assistive technologies, broadly defined. We talk to end-users, to engineers and industrial designers, to artists, and to others whose technologies assist with visible and invisible needs, externalize hidden dynamics, and create capacities far beyond or outside ordinary functionality. The course is organized to facilitate both projects in industrial design and projects that are much more speculative and experimental. Open to all majors, graduate students and upper-level undergraduate students.
  • ID-2480

    MANUFACTURING TECHNIQUIES

    Credits: 3.00

    This course introduces the students to methods, materials, and manufacturing processes that translate design activity into finished goods. A significant portion of downstream design activity is devoted to manufacturing issues - the techniques by which materials are selected, shaped, and then assembled. Students will be evaluated based upon success of weekly field study reserach assignments and a final exam.
    Major requirement; ID majors only
    Registration by Industrial Design department, course not available via web registration
  • ID-2451

    METAL I

    Credits: 3.00

    This course gives the student a hands-on opportunity to develop design skills through the interaction with industrial materials that have strictly defined properties. Experimenting with these materials and the processes by which they are manipulated and formed promotes innovative thinking, problem solving and idea development. Students will achieve a more precise, professional and sensitive approach to design while broadening their technical skill base.
    Major requirement; ID majors only
    Registration by Industrial Design department, course not available via web registration
  • ID-2452

    METAL II

    Credits: 3.00

    The objective of this course is to develop a more precise, professional and sensitive approach to design while broadening the student's technical base. Precision machine tools such as metal lathes, millers and grinders will be introduced. Logical design and set-up approaches will be discussed. Outside design work will be required with emphasis on engineering drawing and sequence of operations. There will be a strong emphasis on experimenting with the material in order to promote innovative thinking and problem solving. Major elective. ID majors only (FALL/WS/SPRING)
  • ID-20ST

    SPECIAL TOPIC DESIGN STUDIO

    Credits: 3.00

    This 3-credit Advanced Studio: special topic category offers juniors the opportunity to focus on various curricular topics including innovative product design through production and fabrication; innovation through socially responsible, humanitarian and sustainable design; and innovation through science and technology. Each studio is designed to strengthen the student's ability for research, ideation, material exploration, presentation, and concept validation. This studio will meet one day per week.
    Juniors are enrolled in two Advanced Design: special topic studios in the fall or spring semester. The studios must be taken during the same semester in order to fulfill one of the advanced studios required for the Industrial Design degree. Placement in the studio is by lottery at the beginning of the semester.
    Major requirement; ID majors only; Permission required for non-majors. Registration of Industrial Design department studio courses is not available via web registration. Some studios have a lab fee for materials and field trips. The fee is announced during the department's registration lottery.
  • ID-2455

    WOOD I

    Credits: 3.00

    Philosophically, the ID Department believes that students become better designers when they have an intimate knowledge of a range of natural and synthetic materials. In this course, students will learn about the properties of natural wood and engineered wood-based materials, investigate the related technical processes, and evaluate how this information is both connected to and influenced by the design process. Students will work with materials directly and master skills needed to manipulate these materials. They will develop projects that allow them to engage in the design and development process, promote creativity, problem solving, and the correct use of materials. Facility procedures, safety, and care and use of tools and equipment will be stressed.
    Major requirement; ID majors only
    Registration by Industrial Design department, course not available via web registration
  • ID-2453

    WOOD II

    Credits: 3.00

    This course will deal with advanced woodworking processes, including milling and machinery use, laminate and steam bending, plywood and veneer. Techniques in using natural and synthetic materials connected with furniture will be covered.
    Major elective; ID majors only
Wintersession 2014
  • ID-3052

    *ITALY: SHOE DESIGN PERCEPTION, HISTORY AND PROTOTYPING

    Credits: 6.00

    Students of each discipline will travel to galleries, studios and factories in Turin, Milan, and Florence, learning traditional and hi-tech design processes that apply to Shoe Design. The goal of the course is for students to practice techniques of shoe design as a product that exists midway between the realms of Apparel and Industrial Design. They will also experience the intersection of creative perspectives and approaches from each discipline. The rich design culture of Italy, and Da Vinci's seven principles of creativity, will serve as inspiration and guide. Each student will actively explore their observations and nurture their evolving design process through journaling and interactive dialogue. Students work will be professionally photographed, and the course will conclude at RISD with a final Exhibition/Crit. Note: The course will spend the first and last weeks at RISD, with the other 3 weeks spent throughout Northern Italy. Dates of Travel: Week 2,3, & 4 of WS 2014.
    Permission of instructor required
    Estimated travel cost: $3,975.00,, airfare not included. Estimated material cost: $100
    Also offered as APPAR-3052. Register in class for which credit is desired
    ***Off-Campus Study***
  • ID-2122

    FUNDAMENTALS OF ENGINEERING FOR DESIGN

    Credits: 3.00

    This course will be tailored to expose Industrial Design and Interior Architecture students at a high level to basic principles of physics and engineering primarily statics and strength (mechanics) of materials.
    The class will include lectures with ample time for discussion, collaborative hands-on and practical sessions to enhance learning by doing. Students will be encouraged to explore subject by playing and experimenting with various simple objects as study and learning aids. These aids will be selected from everyday things: tubes, plates, bicycle frames, simple furniture, etc. Students will be assigned final project (can be individual and group) to design, develop and fabricate simple objects and structures to achieve objectives of the project matching their interest and studies.
    Open to ID Majors Juniors and Above. The list of topics will be adjusted per interest, discussion and understanding include General Principles, Forces and Moments, Equilibrium, External Forces, Internal Forces and Stresses, Sectional Properties, Material, Supports and Joints, Basic Structural Analysis and Failure Types.
  • ID-240G

    GRAD INTRO TO INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

    Credits: 3.00

    This course initiates a dialog around design thinking and teaches several key physical processes used within design. Much of what is learned helps designers move forward with concept ideation and idea evolution. A hands-on approach to understanding these skills and processes will be a primary focus throughout the semester. As we cover different areas of the course, it will be important for students to start to apply what is learned and incorporate its use within their own personal design processes. The goal is for students to familiarize themselves with tools that allow them flexibility and confidence in order to reinvent design processes each time depending on the needs and scope of different projects they may be involved with.

    Areas covered: Getting situated at RISD, the ID Department and Rhode Island; building ideas using hand sketching as a tool; exploring rational behind the form and function of objects; bridging rough sketches to physical 3D objects; understanding the difference between sketch prototypes, works like prototypes and final prototypes; conducting and displaying research; formulating opinions based on research and displaying it using information graphics; building a design mission statement. With what is learned in these areas, students should start to gain confidence and understanding of design process and the ability to use those tools in order to solve problems and how to plan design process.
    Open to ID Graduate Majors only.
  • ID-2400

    INTRO TO INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

    Credits: 3.00

    In this product design studio, we will dissect an existing product, analyze a market segment, and redesign the product to fit the described market. The methodology used to complete this task will be accelerated, giving students an overview of a typical industrial design process. Students will be exposed to design drawing techniques, foam modeling methods, and the concept of designing for consumers.
  • ID-2452

    METAL II

    Credits: 3.00

    The objective of this course is to develop a more precise, professional and sensitive approach to design while broadening the student's technical base. Precision machine tools such as metal lathes, millers and grinders will be introduced. Logical design and set-up approaches will be discussed. Outside design work will be required with emphasis on engineering drawing and sequence of operations. There will be a strong emphasis on experimenting with the material in order to promote innovative thinking and problem solving. Major elective. ID majors only (FALL/WS/SPRING)
  • ID-2302

    POINT,CLICK,DRAG: USABILITY AND THE DIGITAL INTERFACE

    Credits: 3.00

    Since the beginning of human history, we as people have always sought to find new ways to interact with the world around us. Through experimentation and creativity we have managed to make use of a countless number of environmental resources in order to design interactive tools that facilitate our survival and enhance our lives. Fast-foward to today's complex digital world, and we can clearly see that interaction has become a center-piece of our daily experience. From clicking links in cyberspace to tapping buttons on the latest mobile device, interaction has extended far beyond the physical realm and found an exciting place in the world of digital experiences.
    In this hands-on studio, students will take a deep dive into the world of interaction design and explore how we as artists and designers can create digital interfaces that solve real-world problems and ensure high quality user experiences. Students will chose to design an digital interface for a web-based application that solves a specific problem and learn how to effectively develop their ideas through research, sketching, prototyping, and user testing. Final designs will be rendered as clickable full-color prototypes that will be tested and evaluated by the class at the end of the term. Lectures on the principles of interface design will be given to help guide the design process, while demos covering interaction design techniques will be presented to build skills and experience. By the end of the course, students will be able to carry an interface idea from concept to blueprint.
    Note: While this course requires no prior knowledge of interface design, some experience using Adobe Illustrator/Adobe Photoshop is required.
    Open to Sophomore and Above.
  • ID-2303

    STORYTELLING IN ID: DRAWING AND CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT METHODOLOGIES

    Credits: 3.00

    This course explores different methodologies in concept development and rendering in industrial design with the goal of learning how to interpret the world of objects, their user scenarios, their contextual mapping and how they fit in a system, from a two-dimensional point of view.
    This Wintersession Course will help you acquire the necessary knowledge to effectively transfer your ideas on paper, using the tools of the profession, ranging from the traditional pencil and marker approaches to the more advanced Cintiq tablet options.
    During the first two weeks we will review basic perspective and drawing methodologies for concept development and rendering but quickly we will advance towards creating three weekly comprehensive projects with a solid story load.
  • ID-W257

    WOOD II

    Credits: 3.00

    The intent of this course is to advance the student's knowledge of wood working techniques, processes and a sensitivity to wood. In this course, the table saw, joiner and planer are introduced along with advanced techniques using plywood and solid wood construction including veneering, joinery, bending and shaping. The design process will be explored through building. Technical demonstrations will be followed by a series of woodworking projects.

    ID majors only
    Estimated cost of materials: $30.00
Spring Semester 2014
  • ID-24ST

    ADVANCED DESIGN: STUDIO

    Credits: 6.00

    This 6-credit Advanced Design studio category offers juniors and seniors the opportunity to continue their focus on various curricular topics including innovative product design through production and fabrication; innovation through socially responsible, humanitarian and sustainable design; and innovation through science and technology. These studios are designed to strengthen the student's ability to conduct research, ideation, material exploration, presentation, and concept validation. The course develops student's ability and confidence towards professional practice and entrepreneurship within the industrial design field. This studio will meet two days per week.
    ID juniors and seniors are required to take a total of three advanced studios. A 6-credit course taken during Wintersession or in the summer cannot fulfill an Advanced Design studio credit unless pre-approved by the Department Head. Placement for an Advanced Design studio is assigned by lottery at the beginning of each semester.
    Major requirement; ID majors only, unless specified by the instructor and/or department head. Registration of Industrial Design department studio courses is not available via web registration. Some advanced studios have a fee for course supplies or field trips. The fee is announced during the department's registration lottery.
  • ID-3108

    ADVANCED MATERIAL MANIPULATION

    Credits: 3.00

    This class will focus on advanced material manipulation via computer numerical control (CNC) machining. Unlike most of the skills you have accrued in metals I and II, this class will put you in direct control of a process commonly used in the manufacturing world today. We will use this in house real world manufacturing capacity to help develop our design skills, specifically concentrating on cost and efficiency. Through hands on shop experience and CAD tools, we will develop creative design solutions that work through the process to a resolution that is both interesting and cost effective.
    Major Elective; ID majors only
    Permission of instructor for nonmajors
  • ID-2465

    DESIGN PRINCIPLES II

    Credits: 6.00

    This course is a continuation of Design Principles (ID-2464) with an emphasis on problem solving and design process and skills.
    Major requirement; ID majors only
    Registration by Industrial Design department, course not available via web registration
  • ID-2477

    DESIGNING WITH RHINO

    Credits: 3.00

    In this course, you will use the NURBS modeling program Rhinoceros to develop 3D digital models and also produce photo realistic renderings of your designs. A variety of modeling techniques and geometry types will be explored with an emphasis on manufacturing ability and communicating design intent.
    You must have Rhino installed on a computer running Windows for the very first class. A choice of rendering plug-ins is available for Rhino and these options will be covered during the first class. Estimated cost of materials: $200.00
  • ID-2476

    DESIGNING WITH SOLIDWORKS

    Credits: 3.00

    The purpose of this course is to expose students to SolidWorks, a widely used solid modeling software program. Students will learn how to translate their hand-sketches into three-dimensional CAD models. Lectures and assignments will focus on the development of form as it applies to plastic part design and assembly. Physical models will be realized through ABS rapid prototyping allowing students to experience true plastic part design.
    Major requirement; ID majors only
    Registration by Industrial Design department, course not available via web registration
  • ID-2416

    DRAWING FOR DESIGN

    Credits: 3.00

    In this class we will practice the various methods of design exploration and visual communication used by designers. These sketching and rendering skills are ideal for anyone who has to understand and resolve form while communicating ideas within interdisciplinary environments.
    We will focus on sketching from the ideation phase through to a final solution that fully describes the aesthetic and emotive intents, as well as demonstrates knowledge of functional and manufacturing requirements. The class is built on the belief that strong two-dimensional skills remain the essential tool for product designers.
    Major elective; ID majors only
    Permission of instructor for nonmajors
  • ID-3107

    FLIPPED CODING

    Credits: 3.00

    This course reflects the broad and constantly evolving nature of the Industrial Design discipline by introducing CODE FOR DESIGNERS into the RISD ID elective curriculum. The first half of the course will be a "flipped classroom" using the "Processing" handbook as a basis for required reading and assignments followed by studio based 'debugging.' You will also routinely present and articulate your reasoning in the online and in studio collaborative buddy system. Once you have demonstrated your ability to learn computer coding you will spend the second half of the course designing and iteratively creating a computer or micro-controller based coding project.
    Major elective; ID majors only
    Permission of Instructor for nonmajors
  • ID-244G

    GRADUATE ID SEMINAR II

    Credits: 3.00

    This seminar will examine issues arising from the study of contemporary critical theory. It is the second in a two part seminar experience designed to establish a social and professional framework for the thesis project. With the guidance and support of the instructor, graduate students will survey the landscape of contemporary critical theory and discuss issues relevant to current design challenges. The seminar serves the dual role of developing broader perspectives on the relevance of graduate study to a larger social context, and strengthening the frame of reference for the discourse in group critiques.
    Graduate major requirement; ID majors only
    Registration by Industrial Design department, course not available via web registration
  • ID-242G

    GRADUATE ID STUDIO II

    Credits: 9.00

    The second studio experience in the MID program focuses on interpretation as a crucial component of problem solving in the design process. Nine thematic briefs are provided, from which students select two. Subsequent design projects represent the students' considered position on the relevance of the selected theme to contemporary design practice. The range of themes explored in the class broadens the critical discourse on issues pertinent to the field of Industrial Design and provides a segue way to the students' declaration of thesis topics.
    Graduate major requirement; ID majors only
    Registration by Industrial Design department, course not available via web registration
  • ID-248G

    GRADUATE ID THESIS

    Credits: 12.00

    Develop the graduate thesis into three component parts: the thesis presentation, the physical body of work for exhibit and the written Thesis document.
    Graduate major requirement; ID majors only
    Registration by Industrial Design department, course not available via web registration
  • LAEL-LE38

    HISTORY OF INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

    Credits: 3.00

    The course is divided into three parts:
    (1) Current issues in the historiography of the field
    (2) Topics in history of industrial design from 1750 to 1945 - such as collaborations between art and industry; mass production; changing patterns of consumption; industrial design and corporate imagery; the social and/or technological impact of industrial design and corporate imagery; the social and/or technological impact of industrial design on transportation, the domestic interior, and the workplace
    (3) Individual research in an aspect of design since 1945. Extensive readings, lectures, discussions, two papers and materials that currently are defining this pivotal field.
    Major requirement; Art History credit for ID majors
    Liberal Arts elective credit for nonmajors
  • ID-2494

    INTRO TO SHOEMAKING

    Credits: 3.00

    Shoes are an everyday commodity; but do you know how many are steps involved? In this course, students will handcraft a basic pair of cemented construction shoes from start to finish. This includes beginning by creating a basic pattern, draping the last, cutting (clicking) the leather, sewing (closing) the upper, building a stacked leather heel, and finishing the sole. We will approach the requirements of constructing a shoe through choice of material, characteristics of leather, and how to utilize them in laying out the pattern. In the process of the construction from pattern to shoe, we will work with basic tools for handcrafted shoemaking including a shoemaker's knife, closers hammer, buff stick, lasting pincers to name a few. Students are expected to complete one pair of shoes and begin work on a second pair, applying and expanding upon the techniques learned in the class.
    Estimated Cost of Materials: $225.00
    ID majors only
    Also offered as APPAR 2494 for Apparel majors
  • ID-2480

    MANUFACTURING TECHNIQUIES

    Credits: 3.00

    This course introduces the students to methods, materials, and manufacturing processes that translate design activity into finished goods. A significant portion of downstream design activity is devoted to manufacturing issues - the techniques by which materials are selected, shaped, and then assembled. Students will be evaluated based upon success of weekly field study reserach assignments and a final exam.
    Major requirement; ID majors only
    Registration by Industrial Design department, course not available via web registration
  • ID-2452

    METAL II

    Credits: 3.00

    The objective of this course is to develop a more precise, professional and sensitive approach to design while broadening the student's technical base. Precision machine tools such as metal lathes, millers and grinders will be introduced. Logical design and set-up approaches will be discussed. Outside design work will be required with emphasis on engineering drawing and sequence of operations. There will be a strong emphasis on experimenting with the material in order to promote innovative thinking and problem solving. Major elective. ID majors only (FALL/WS/SPRING)
  • ID-20ST

    SPECIAL TOPIC DESIGN STUDIO

    Credits: 3.00

    This 3-credit Advanced Studio: special topic category offers juniors the opportunity to focus on various curricular topics including innovative product design through production and fabrication; innovation through socially responsible, humanitarian and sustainable design; and innovation through science and technology. Each studio is designed to strengthen the student's ability for research, ideation, material exploration, presentation, and concept validation. This studio will meet one day per week.
    Juniors are enrolled in two Advanced Design: special topic studios in the fall or spring semester. The studios must be taken during the same semester in order to fulfill one of the advanced studios required for the Industrial Design degree. Placement in the studio is by lottery at the beginning of the semester.
    Major requirement; ID majors only; Permission required for non-majors. Registration of Industrial Design department studio courses is not available via web registration. Some studios have a lab fee for materials and field trips. The fee is announced during the department's registration lottery.
  • ID-2453

    WOOD II

    Credits: 3.00

    This course will deal with advanced woodworking processes, including milling and machinery use, laminate and steam bending, plywood and veneer. Techniques in using natural and synthetic materials connected with furniture will be covered.
    Major elective; ID majors only
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Louie Rigano, BFA 10, Tessellate, Tea Set, slipcast porcelain