Fall 2017

  1. Advanced Studio

    These studios, three of which are required for graduation, are offered by individual instructors to students who have successfully completed the core curriculum. They are assigned by lottery on the first day of classes. Once assigned to an advanced studio, a student may not drop studio.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $50 - $200

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

    Fee: Some advanced studio sections have a fee for course supplies or field trips. The fee is announced during the registration lottery held in the Department.

  2. Advanced Topics In Architectural Computation

    This 3 credit advanced seminar offers students the opportunity to focus on computational topics pertaining to architecture. Computational techniques and computational ideas are explored through making, writing, reading, and discussion. Some of the work in this course will take place in the space of the digital model, but coding, physical computation, and human computation may also enter into play. Students in this course will, under the mentorship of faculty, develop a level of expertise and knowledge that goes beyond what is usually associated with the requisite skills for contemporary architectural practice. Conversely, it is expected that computation may provoke a challenge to even the most base conceptions of design and architecture. Each iteration of this course will identify and advance a single theme, concept or problem. Some issues that may arise during this course include authorship, modeling vs simulation, computer controlled fabrication, intelligence, and creativity. Prerequisite: completion of Architectural Projection or permission of instructor with a demonstrated experience with 2-D and 3-D software.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $20 - $100

    Major elective

    Restricted to Architecture majors junior and above; open to CTC Concentrators and non-majors pending seat availability and permission of Instructor.

  3. Advanced Topics In Architectural Technology

    This 3 credit advanced seminar offers students the opportunity to focus on advanced applications of technology in architecture. Students will explore the relationship between design and technology within topics such as advanced energy modeling, advanced structural analysis, high performance structures, high performance building facades, and sustainable design. These seminars are designed to strengthen students' ability to conduct research, explore material performance and enable validation of design concepts based on applied technology.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $30.00 - $50.00

    Major elective

    Restricted to Architecture juniors and above; open to non-majors pending seat availability and permission of Instructor.

  4. Advanced Topics In Architectural Theory

    Theory offerings in the architecture department are deliberately consistent or complementary with our pedagogy, born and raised in an arts college. Theory based courses have a basis in empiricism, direct observation and experience of creative processes. Recognizing that discovery and invention often come between existing matrices of thought, offerings may be from disciplines other than architecture or branches of knowledge other than art and design.

    Objectives of the theory component of our curriculum are to:

    1. Expand the capacity to speculate productively.

    2. Develop the skeptic's eye and mind.

    3. Equip the ability to recognize connections that trigger discovery and invention.

    Major elective

    Restricted to Architecture majors junior and above; open to non-majors pending seat availability and permission of Instructor.

  5. Architectural Projection

    This course introduces the beginning student to the origins, media, geometries and role(s) of projection drawing in the design and construction process. The student will learn systems of projection drawing from direct experience, and be challenged to work both from life and to life. Subjects such as transparency, figure/ground, sciagraphy, oblique projection, surface development, volumetric intersections, spatial manipulation and analytic operations will build on the basics of orthographic and conic projection. The course involves line and tone drawing, hand drafting, computer drawing(Autocad) and computer modeling(Rhino).

    Estimated Materials Cost: $20 - $100 Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  6. Collaborative Study

    A Collaborative Study Project (CSP) allows two students to work collaboratively to complete a faculty supervised project of independent study.

    Usually, a CSP is supervised by two faculty members, but with approval it may be supervised by one faculty member. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses, though it is not a substitute for a course if that course is regularly offered.

  7. EHP Fall:studio Concentration

    In this intensive independent studio students continue and complete the work began in "EHP Studio Elective", culminating in the final exhibition and review. It corresponds to the remaining four weeks of the program, after students have finished with their Art History and Italian classes.

    Note: EHP credits replace the on-campus major requirements for the term students attend. Distribution to non-major requirements occurs when major credits are not needed.

  8. EHP Studio Elective

    Independent studio is at the core of the EHP experience. Upon arrival, students are assigned studio space at the Palazzetto Cenci, home of RISD's program in Rome. With guidance from the chief critic, each student develops a personal body of work sparked by his/her interactions with places, people and circumstances in Rome and other locations that are part of the EHP tours (such as the Northern, Southern or Eastern tours, as well as other shorter trips.) The work takes as a point of departure knowledge and techniques specific to individual home departments, but allows, and even encourages, explorations beyond disciplinary boundaries, including collaborations and cross-fertilization within a group of students from different departments working together.

    Beyond consistent and thorough engagement with studio work, requirements include participation in open studios and exhibitions, presentations in reviews, and attendance to all group activities and events, such as lectures at the Cenci and other institutions. From time to time, the chief critic may issue short assignments to introduce or focus on a particular subject. As part of the studio elective, students may be encouraged to keep sketchbooks and/or diaries, participate in optional activities--such as figure drawing sessions--and search for brief internships, apprenticeships, or other forms of interactions with local artists, designers, curators and critics.

    EHP Studio Elective corresponds to the first twelve weeks of the program, while students are also taking Art History and Italian classes. This course establishes the direction for the work in the "Studio Concentration" course that follows.

    Note: EHP credits replace the on-campus major requirements for the term students attend. Distribution to non-major requirements occurs when major credits are not needed.

  9. Environmental Design I

    The study of basic concepts of Human Environmental Comforts. Inherent within 'physio-environ' considerations are principles of temperature, humidity, heat transfer, air movement, and hydrostatics. These principles will be studied in terms of their abstract physics and mathematics, through empirical benchmarking and as the basis for a design proposal that includes considerations of larger scale strategies as well as assemblies. Emphasis will be placed on the principles behind the technology, the behavioral characteristics and the qualities of the systems' operation considered in making building design decisions.

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only; open to NCSS Concentrators pending seat availability and permission of Instructor.

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  10. Graduate Theory Seminar: Making Discourse

    This is a theoretical seminar course that will be concerned with ideas and architectural knowledge that may be cultivated and tested through discourse. The course discussions will focus on an expansive role of architectural tools. While acknowledging a wealth of disciplinary conventions, histories and theories, this course recognizes that the forms of representation within the discipline of architecture have the capacity to affect the discipline of architecture and are not fixed. Students in this course will be expected to build upon their previous architectural education through a series of directed projects aimed at advancing architectural theories, ideas and methods. Some of the questions that students will be expected to address are: What are the practical, theoretical, and creative implications of a drawing that functions as architecture? How do architects change the way we make and think thanks to digital media? How do architects represent and model natural forces? How do architects express political or social agendas? What is the nature of an architectural contribution to interdisciplinary discourse? How can representation enable new kinds of artistic and research-based practices for architecture? Students will be expected to self-direct their process while framing their work intellectually in a seminar environment.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $150.00

    Graduate Major requirement; Architecture 2-year majors only

    Open to first-year M.ARCH Advanced Standing students only.

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

    Open to non-majors pending seat availability and permission of Instructor.

  11. ISP Major

    The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses.

    Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; course not available via web registration.

  12. Integrated Building Systems

    Conceived as the culmination of the technologies sequence of courses, this course allows students to choose amongst the three instructor's differing approaches to the problem of conceiving technology holistically, in relation to a set of architectural criteria. The conceptual and technical aspects of building systems are considered and emergent environmentally-conscious technologies are emphasized for research and application.

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

    Prerequisites: All required technologies courses.

  13. Professional Internship

    ARCH 8960 is an optional off campus internship, which may be taken during the summer or in wintersession. Depending on the nature of the work, the internship may count for major elective credit within the department or for non-major elective credit. Total hours required are 180.

    Course not available via web registration.

  14. Steel Structures

    This course reviews the role of metals in architecture, focusing on the fundamentals of steel analysis and design in architecture; and examines typical framing techniques and systems. Topics include construction issues, floor framing systems, column analysis and design, steel detailing and light gauge steel framing materials and systems. In addition the course introduces students to lateral force resistance systems in steel construction and exposes them to alternatives to steel such as aluminum and fiberglass. By the end of the course, students will be aware of the role of metals in architectural design and construction; design and detail simple steel structural systems; and proportion these systems to resist the moment and shear demands determined through structural analysis.

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  15. Structural Analysis

    The basic content will be statics and strength of materials. The first portion will deal with force vectors, trusses, cross-sectional properties, and shear/moment diagrams, followed by stresses, strains, material applications and the analysis procedures necessary to compute structural behaviors. While the class format is mostly lecture, there will be ample time for discussion, in addition to group projects and field trips. This class is foundational to all future structural design classes such as Wood Structures and Steel Structures. The student will develop an intuitive understanding of structural behavior by studying various structural systems qualitatively under various loading conditions. The analysis of statically determinate trusses and frames will reinforce the intuitive understanding. Structural forces will be understood by tracing the loads (dead, live, wind, and seismic) through a building. They will be able to convert these loads into internal material stresses (axial, shear bending) for the purposes of proportioning members quantitatively. The relevant material sectional properties (such as moment of inertia and radius of gyration) will be learned through hands on bending and buckling experiments and later backed by quantitative analysis. A math test will be given prior to the first class to determine which students are required to attend a supplemental lecture class instructed by the teaching assistant. This course is a pre-requisite for Steel Structures, Wood Structures, and Concrete Structures.

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  16. The Making Of Design Principles

    This course, the first in a two semester sequence, explores design principles specific to architecture. Two interrelated aspects of design are pursued: 1) the elements of composition and their formal, spatial, and tectonic manipulation and 2) meanings conveyed by formal choices and transformations.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $50 - $200

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  17. Thesis Sem: Navigating The Creative Process

    We begin work on your Thesis Projects from the outset of the semester: navigating arbitrary beginnings; setting boundaries like nets; developing a whole language of grunts, smudges and haiku; gathering the unique and unrepeatable content, forces, and conditions of your project; hunting an emerging and fleeting idea; recognizing discoveries; projecting forward with the imagination; and distilling glyphs, diagrams and insight plans.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $50 - $200

    This course satisfies the prerequisite requirement for Thesis Project.

  18. Urban Ecologies

    The Urban Ecologies core studio introduces students to the city as a designed environment with an emphasis on sustainability, giving them the tools to work through impressions, analysis and design operations as ways to understand the relationship between naturally formed and culturally constructed landscapes and strategies for urban ecological development.". Students confront the design of housing as a way to order social relationships and shape the public realm and attack the problems of structure, construction, access and code compliance in the context of a complex large-scale architectural design.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $50 - $200

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  19. Wkshp: Tool Workshop

    In this workshop students will learn how to use new tools critical to the evolving nature of the discipline. Traditional woodworking tools require hand control and are time intensive. New technology of 3d printing, CNC and laser cutting combine the power of computation with the power of hand and mind to create the potential for intricate constructions and a new craft.

    This course will teach students the basic skills needed to use Digital equipment in the Shared Technology Shop. Students will learn programming and how to set up tools. Exercises will be included to help students realize the machining capabilities.

    The workshop will meet 5 times a semester.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $35.00

    Open to junior and above.

Wintersession 2018

  1. *Italy: Ws Travel Rome From Pantheon To Maam

    Pantheon is one of the first architectural projects using light as element of architecture. MAAM is a museum of everything but light. Pantheon is one of the historical symbols of Rome. MAAM is the new boundary at the edge of Rome. What is linking these two realities? Like in Einstein's famous image, in this course we will travel riding a beam of light from Rome's historic center to the final frontier of the eternal city, where tourists normally don't dare to go. Students will explore the connections and disconnections between center and periphery, employing these urban polarities as metaphors of aesthetic and social dichotomies: light and darkness, beauty and ugliness, order and chaos, heritage and urban mayhem. We will explore the centre of Rome in terms of art, light, urban and social layers, through site visits and tours by local guest lecturers, Emanuela Pulvirenti, lighting designer and art teacher, and other guest lecturers. We will understand the importance of daylight and artificial light in architecture, urban planning and painting, discovering the meaning and use of light particularly during the Baroque period. The final goal of the workshop will be to rethink and reconcile these theoretical and space oppositions. This wintersession course will be organized in collaboration with Master in Lighting Design of University La Sapienza in Rome. Up to four of the best students in the program will take part in the wintersession course, to help RISD students connect better to the place and to "real life". Students will work with small groups and each group will be formed by at least one La Sapienza student. This class proposes a new way of teaching to students and connect them to gain deeper understanding of the place they are designing for, giving them new tools of observation and investigation, useful in everyday life to discover a space. The course will close with a final installation by students.

    All students are required to remain in good academic standing in order to participate in the WS travel course/studio. Failure to remain in good academic standing can lead to removal from the course, either before or during the course. Also in cases where WS travel courses and studios do not reach student capacity, the course may be cancelled after the last day of Wintersession travel course registration. As such, all students are advised not to purchase flights for participation in Wintersession travel courses until the course is confirmed to run, which happens within the week after the final Wintersession travel course registration period.

    Registration begins in October at a time to be announced.

    Permission of Instructor required.

    Open to first year students with approval from the Dean of Experimental and Foundation Studies.

    2018WS Estimated Travel cost: $2,500.00 - airfare not included.

    ***Off-Campus Study***

  2. *Japan: Contemporary Works And Their Execution: Kyoto And Naoshima

    Temples and shrines, tranquil gardens, traditional crafts, and music-these are all things that should not be missed when visiting the city of Kyoto and the island of Naoshima in Japan. Yet, both locations are also places of new things and ideas giving rise to laboratories of innovation in both architecture and the arts.

    In recent years, there has been a movement to renovate and preserve the historical "machiya" houses, a traditional typology in the city of Kyoto that has a shop space opening onto the street at the front and living spaces behind and on the floors above. The machiya were erected by skilled carpenters using traditional building techniques but now are under threat from modern building growth. These houses, filled with objects, are now considered economically unsustainable by developers and are regularly removed and replaced by parking structures or apartment blocks. In an effort to preserve these buildings and ways of living, organizations and private entities have been converting them to other uses and programs. These transformations have added a new face to the city landscape. Conversely, the island of Naoshima has promoted in recent years the work of emerging architects and artists as a way to enliven the economy of the Seto Inland Sea islands without losing sight of the strong connection with the traditional structures, objects, and events that constitute Japanese culture. Observations made in the city of Kyoto and on the island of Naoshima become research catalysts towards the formation of a possible future proposal for the Setouchi Triennale, one of Japan's larges international art festivals where selected projects are constructed for the duration of at least three years. This course is a joint exploration between the Departments of Architecture and Ceramics devoted to the examination of spatial relationships and how the role of ceramic objects activate spaces in the machiya house typology, tea houses, and temples. Japanese ceramic utilitarian objects can be used for mediation and dialogue, as activators of human interaction, and as carriers of history, heritage, and political power. This "biography" of objects intertwines values and aesthetics.

    The course would take place in Japan during the five weeks of wintersession; four weeks would in Kyoto and the last week of the term on the island of Naoshima.

    br> This is a co-requisite course. Students must also plan and register for ARCH-1505. Students will receive 6 studio credits.

    All students are required to remain in good academic standing in order to participate in the WS travel course/studio. Failure to remain in good academic standing can lead to removal from the course, either before or during the course. Also in cases where WS travel courses and studios do not reach student capacity, the course may be cancelled after the last day of Wintersession travel course registration. As such, all students are advised not to purchase flights for participation in Wintersession travel courses until the course is confirmed to run, which happens within the week after the final Wintersession travel course registration period.

    Registration begins in October at a time to be announced.

    Permission of Instructor required.

    Open to sophomore and above; course is not open to first year students.

    2018WS Estimated Travel Cost: $3,154.00 - airfare not included.

    ***Off-Campus Study***

  3. *Portugal: Material Practices

    Although separated by the Atlantic Ocean, Providence and surrounding New England towns have deep ties to Portugal. An influx of immigrants from Portugal, who settled in New England in the late-18th century, links the two regions. Providence, East Providence, Central Falls, Fall River, and New Bedford, among other towns, continue to function as vital hubs for Portuguese Americans today. Students in the co-requisite liberal arts and studio courses that comprise "Portugal: Material Practices" will use the methodologies of architecture, design, and the environmental humanities to investigate how two different materials-stone and cork-function as nodes in intersecting biological, cultural, economic, geological, material, political, social, and theoretical networks that route through Portugal. Although stone and cork and the material explorations students will conduct in relation to these materials are specifically linked to the areas of Portugal we will visit, these explorations are applicable to broader contexts, both local and global.

    Students will spend the first three weeks of the course in Portugal, which offers a unique context in which to study making and adapting the natural and built environment towards sustainable models of design innovation. While abroad, students will study the roles natural resources play in the future of historic places; will investigate principles for the design of artifacts, systems, and/or building technologies that engage both local and global knowledge; and will use literature, theory, and other cultural texts to test, frame, and deepen their ideas. Locations will include the San Miguel, Lisbon, Porto, and the Alentejo region, with additional day trips. The last two weeks of the course will take place in Providence. Students will complete regular design, drawing, collecting, reading, and writing assignments throughout the entire course. Producing the final project for the course-a publication that will weave together architectural and environmental humanities approaches to a site from the travel component of the course-will be the focus of the last two weeks of the course.

    This is a co-requisite course. Students must also plan and register for ARCH-1584 or IDISC-1584. Students will receive 3 studio credits and 3 liberal arts credits.

    All students are required to remain in good academic standing in order to participate in the WS travel course/studio. Failure to remain in good academic standing can lead to removal from the course, either before or during the course. Also in cases where WS travel courses and studios do not reach student capacity, the course may be cancelled after the last day of Wintersession travel course registration. As such, all students are advised not to purchase flights for participation in Wintersession travel courses until the course is confirmed to run, which happens within the week after the final Wintersession travel course registration period.

    Registration begins in October at a time to be announced.

    Permission of Instructor required.

    Open to first year students with approval from the Dean of Experimental and Foundation Studies.

    2018WS Estimated Travel Cost: $2,500.00 - airfare not included.

    ***Off-Campus Study***

  4. Architectonics

    An introduction to the principles of architectural design beginning with a close examination of materials, forces and the human body. The examination will progressively widen in scope to include issues of form, space, structure, program and site. This condensed architectural studio is intended for freshmen and students outside the Division of Architecture and Design.

  5. Architecture Professional Internship

    ARCH-2199 is the required summer internship. It may be completed in any summer prior to entering the final year. Total hours required are 280. This internship can count for NCARB Architectural Experience Program AX-P. The internship hours for ARCH-2199 can be used towards architecture licensure through the NCARB Internship. Student's intent upon becoming registered architects in the USA after graduation should enroll in the AXP as soon as possible. AXP is the internship program required by all registration jurisdictions. The work experience accomplished during ARCH-2199, the department's minimum Internship experience (280 hours) can be recorded as acceptable experience in the AXP (3740 hours) and thus accelerate one's pace towards architectural licensure.

    Website: http://www.ncarb.org/Experience-Through-Internship s.aspx

    To register, go to www.risdcareers.com (ArtWorks)

    Course not available via web registration.

  6. Math And Physics Review

    Math and Physics Review is intended for architecture students who want to strengthen their math and physics skills. The course is tailored to emphasize concepts and processes used in the required structural courses of RISD's architecture department. The goal is to bring students up to speed with algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and physics concepts and develop a learning strategy and problem-solving approach for future structures courses. Problem sets, hands-on experiments, and lectures will be tailored to the students' interests and review needs, and will be approached with an attitude of judgment-free help. Highly encouraged for freshmen and 1st year students.

    Open to Graduate and Undergraduate Students

  7. Professional Internship

    ARCH 8960 is an optional off campus internship, which may be taken during the summer or in wintersession. Depending on the nature of the work, the internship may count for major elective credit within the department or for non-major elective credit. Total hours required are 180.

    Course not available via web registration.

  8. Thesis Research

    Serious research and a specific preparation begins in this course, forming the theoretical basis for the creative development of the Thesis Project (Spring, 6 credits). This is a period in which the nature of the work is clarified, a process is developed, possibilities are examined, and research and information gathering completed.

    The research from this course acts as an armature, establishing the attitude, objectives, and significance of the thesis as an exploration of architectural ideas, and forming the underpinnings for the work of the coming semester. The result of this effort, completed in the spring, is gathered together and reflected in the Thesis Book as part of the requirements for completion of Thesis. The work is reviewed at the end of Wintersession; satisfactory completion of this course is a prerequisite for the Thesis Project in the Spring semester.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $50 - $200

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Permission of Instructor required.

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

    Schedule to be determined with Advisor.

  9. Wkshp: Tool Workshop

    In this workshop students will learn how to use new tools critical to the evolving nature of the discipline. Traditional woodworking tools require hand control and are time intensive. New technology of 3d printing, CNC and laser cutting combine the power of computation with the power of hand and mind to create the potential for intricate constructions and a new craft.

    This course will teach students the basic skills needed to use Digital equipment in the Shared Technology Shop. Students will learn programming and how to set up tools. Exercises will be included to help students realize the machining capabilities.

    The workshop will meet 5 times a semester.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $35.00

    Open to junior and above.

Spring 2018

  1. Advanced Studio

    These studios, three of which are required for graduation, are offered by individual instructors to students who have successfully completed the core curriculum. They are assigned by lottery on the first day of classes. Once assigned to an advanced studio, a student may not drop studio.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $50 - $200

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

    Fee: Some advanced studio sections have a fee for course supplies or field trips. The fee is announced during the registration lottery held in the Department.

  2. Advanced Topics In Architectural Computation

    This 3 credit advanced seminar offers students the opportunity to focus on computational topics pertaining to architecture. Computational techniques and computational ideas are explored through making, writing, reading, and discussion. Some of the work in this course will take place in the space of the digital model, but coding, physical computation, and human computation may also enter into play. Students in this course will, under the mentorship of faculty, develop a level of expertise and knowledge that goes beyond what is usually associated with the requisite skills for contemporary architectural practice. Conversely, it is expected that computation may provoke a challenge to even the most base conceptions of design and architecture. Each iteration of this course will identify and advance a single theme, concept or problem. Some issues that may arise during this course include authorship, modeling vs simulation, computer controlled fabrication, intelligence, and creativity. Prerequisite: completion of Architectural Projection or permission of instructor with a demonstrated experience with 2-D and 3-D software.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $20 - $100

    Major elective

    Restricted to Architecture majors junior and above; open to CTC Concentrators and non-majors pending seat availability and permission of Instructor.

  3. Advanced Topics In Architectural Drawing

    This 3 credit advanced seminar offers students the opportunity to focus on drawing topics pertaining to architecture. Drawing is treated as a space for architectural research and/or as an autonomous work of architecture. The notion that drawing serves architecture merely as representation is questioned and critiqued. The theoretical and technical focus on the process of drawing will cultivate and address issues that have for hundreds of years served as the core of the architecture discipline. Simultaneously, the research may allow for the generation or assimilation of ideas, cultures and knowledge from other fields into architecture.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $20 - $100

    Major elective

    Restricted to Architecture majors junior and above; open to non-majors pending seat availability and permission of Instructor.

  4. Advanced Topics In Architectural Technology

    This 3 credit advanced seminar offers students the opportunity to focus on advanced applications of technology in architecture. Students will explore the relationship between design and technology within topics such as advanced energy modeling, advanced structural analysis, high performance structures, high performance building facades, and sustainable design. These seminars are designed to strengthen students' ability to conduct research, explore material performance and enable validation of design concepts based on applied technology.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $30.00 - $50.00

    Major elective

    Restricted to Architecture juniors and above; open to non-majors pending seat availability and permission of Instructor.

  5. Advanced Topics In Architectural Theory

    Theory offerings in the architecture department are deliberately consistent or complementary with our pedagogy, born and raised in an arts college. Theory based courses have a basis in empiricism, direct observation and experience of creative processes. Recognizing that discovery and invention often come between existing matrices of thought, offerings may be from disciplines other than architecture or branches of knowledge other than art and design.

    Objectives of the theory component of our curriculum are to:

    1. Expand the capacity to speculate productively.

    2. Develop the skeptic's eye and mind.

    3. Equip the ability to recognize connections that trigger discovery and invention.

    Major elective

    Restricted to Architecture majors junior and above; open to non-majors pending seat availability and permission of Instructor.

  6. Architectural Analysis

    This course will develop one's ability to critically read and understand architecture through formal, geometric, tectonic and spatial analytic processes. Analysis acts as an intermediary between observation, expression, and understanding, offering deep insights into works of architecture. The course builds upon the processes introduced in Architectural Projection. Through various conceptual and representational frameworks, the issues of mapping-layers. Point of view, scale, morphology, topography and tectonics will be explored as part of a larger creative process, embracing visual imagination, communication and critique.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $20 - $100

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  7. Architectural Design

    Design principles presented in the first semester are further developed through a series of projects involving actual sites with their concomitant physical and historic-cultural conditions. Issues of context, methodology, program and construction are explored for their possible interrelated meanings and influences on the making of architectural form.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $50 - $200

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  8. Concrete Structures

    This course reviews the fundamentals of concrete and masonry in architecture with a focus on materials, structural analysis and design. The analysis and design includes concrete structures, reinforced and pre-stressed concrete members, concrete foundations and reinforced masonry. The student will proportion concrete and masonry structures using ultimate strength design. The longer class time on Tuesday allows students to design, make a concrete mix and create a concrete object. By the end of the course, the students will be able to design and detail simple concrete and masonry systems such as footings, basement walls, beams and slabs; proportion these systems to resist the moment and shear demands determined through structural analysis; develop an understanding of proper detailing of architectural concrete and masonry veneers by understanding thermal movements, waterproofing, and construction techniques.

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  9. Environmental Design II

    This equally distributed three part course will continue with the principles from "Physics", the application of electric energy, lighting and sound to building environs. Building technology continues to demand a larger percentage of the building's budget and thus should receive a greater degree of time and understanding by the Architect. Topics and principles to be included are: electronic generation, distribution, and building systems; electronic and communication systems; lighting fundamentals, design and control; and enviro-acoustical fundamentals, sound transmission, amplification, and absorption principles.

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only; open to NCSS Concentrators pending seat availability and permission of Instructor.

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  10. Modern Architecture

    The course will focus on the diverse new roles encountered by the architect in the 20th century: form maker, administrator of urban development, social theorist, cultural interpreter, ideologue. Emphasis will be placed upon the increasing interdependence of architecture and the city, and the recurrent conflicts between mind and hand, modernity and locality, expressionism and universality.

    Major requirement; Architecture majors

    Art History credit for Architecture majors

    Liberal Arts elective credit for non-majors pending seat availability.

  11. Principles Of Professional Practice

    This is a course about becoming a licensed architect, a business professional and an active, engaged and responsible citizen. It is intended to help prepare students for the challenges and opportunities confronted by a life in Architecture. Lectures are organized around four themes: The architect as a trained and certified "Professional" in traditional and alternative careers; the architect as an operative in the world of business and commerce; the origins of architectural projects; and the detailed work performed through professional Architectural Contracts. Regular panels, composed of RISD alums and other allied professionals provide an external perspective on all elements of the course, and allow students the opportunity to direct discussion in ways appropriate to their needs.

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration

  12. Professional Internship

    ARCH 8960 is an optional off campus internship, which may be taken during the summer or in wintersession. Depending on the nature of the work, the internship may count for major elective credit within the department or for non-major elective credit. Total hours required are 180.

    Course not available via web registration.

  13. Rethinking Green Urbanism

    As over half the world's population has come to live in cities, urbanization has moved to the center of the environmental debate. This course will provide an interdisciplinary engagement between Sociology and Architecture to reflect on the past, present and future of ecological urbanism. Co-taught by professors from Architecture and Liberal Arts, the seminar will interrogate the ways in which green urban design has been conceptualized to date. It will explore cutting edge contemporary debates around the future of the green urban project and ask students to think forward into the future.
    Open to sophomore and above.

    Permission of Instructor Required.

    Also offered as HPSS-S151; Register in the course for which credit is desired.

  14. Thesis Project

    Under the supervision of a faculty advisor, students are responsible for the preparation and completion of an independent thesis project.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $50 - $200

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

    Permission for this class is based on the student's overall academic record as well as their performance in Wintersession Thesis Research. If the department recommends against a student undertaking the thesis project, two advanced elective studios must be taken instead.

    Prerequisites: One of the thesis project seminars. See footnotes on the curriculum sheet for a list of these classes or read the course descriptions in the "History and Theory" section which follows.

  15. Wkshp: Tool Workshop

    In this workshop students will learn how to use new tools critical to the evolving nature of the discipline. Traditional woodworking tools require hand control and are time intensive. New technology of 3d printing, CNC and laser cutting combine the power of computation with the power of hand and mind to create the potential for intricate constructions and a new craft.

    This course will teach students the basic skills needed to use Digital equipment in the Shared Technology Shop. Students will learn programming and how to set up tools. Exercises will be included to help students realize the machining capabilities.

    The workshop will meet 5 times a semester.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $35.00

    Open to junior and above.

  16. Wood Structures

    This course will review the fundamentals of wood in architecture with a focus on wood materials and construction systems and lumber and timber structural analysis and design. Work includes timber systems consisting of conventional framing trusses, laminates, built-up sections and connections. In addition, this course will review the principles of structural loads; gravity, lateral, live and dead. The concept of lateral resistance through standard wood framing systems will be explored. Manufactured lumber has become a major part of today's wood construction industry and the design and detailing of these materials will be explored in depth. By the end of the course, students will be aware of the role of wood materials in architectural design and construction and be able to design and detail simple Lumber and Timber structural systems. They will be able to proportion these systems to resist the moment and shear demands determined through structural analysis. This course will provide the student with a good understanding of the material and the common structural and architectural systems used in today's practice.

    Major Requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by the Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

Departments

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