Fall 2017

  1. Acequias

    This studio will investigate the irrigation ditches of the Middle Rio Grande Valley of New Mexico. Although agricultural production within the Middle Rio Grande Valley has decreased significantly within the past century, hundreds of miles of irrigation ditches (known locally as acequias) remain in the valley, weaving through the residential neighborhoods of Albuquerque, skirting the industrial zone at the base of the escarpment, and flowing alongside heavily trafficked commercial streets to deliver water to the remaining agricultural fields. Although the ditches were originally constructed solely as irrigation infrastructure to water agricultural fields, as the environment has changed around them, they have become an integral part of the region's ecological, hydrological, recreational and transportation network. Unlike most urban water infrastructure which is buried underground or is sealed in concrete, the irrigation ditches of the Middle Rio Grande Valley are earthen and are able to function as living systems that engage with dynamic ecological and hydrological processes. The "leaky" irrigation ditches serve to recharge the aquifer and maintain the region's riparian habitat by spreading the water and associated ecologies across the river valley, essentially re-engineering the original broad flood plain without flooding people's houses.

    Every year as the water flows in the earthen channels it slowly erodes at the clay soils along the ditch banks. Over time this has led to severe erosion along many of the ditches. The city responds to the erosion by either lining the ditches with shotcrete or dumping chunks of concrete debris along the edge. This treatment impairs the other hydrological, ecological and aesthetic functions of the ditches as well as often leading to worse erosion.

    In this studio, students will be asked to develop a module that can help to stabilize the edge of the embankments while supporting the other functions of the ditches. Students will explore the formal aspects of the module to understand how it performs within the different hydrological and ecological conditions as well as supporting the aesthetic human experience of the space. Some of the material, formal and performative questions we may ask are: How does the module aggregate and disperse to respond to different site conditions? Can the module provide slope stabilization and pockets for planting to support the range of aquatic species along the ditches? Can the module enhance the human use and aesthetic experience of the space? How long should the materials persist? Could they disappear overtime once the plant roots stabilize the banks? Can community groups along the ditch construct and install the forms? By the end of the semester, students will develop a 1:1 model of their module, test a scaled model within a flume to see how it performs hydrologically, and design a segment of the ditch to respond to the site conditions.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $200.00

    There is a five day trip to Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    Estimated Travel Cost: TBD

    Elective

    Open to senior and above

    Permission of Instructor required.

    Also offered as ID-4011 and SCULP-4011 for 3 credits; Register in the course for which credit is desired.

    Also offered as LDAR-22ST-01 for LDAR Majors only for 6 credits.

  2. Advanced Pottery & Ceramic Production

    Students in this class will learn to use a variety of ceramic production methods techniques including; molding, pressing, extruding, and giggering, to design and make small pottery editions. The focus is the design and perfection of the objects made and methods used. This class will also serve as a platform for inviting visiting artists to make small editions using our production facilities.

    Major requirement; Ceramic majors

    Registration by Ceramics Department, course not available via web registration.

    Open to non-majors with department permission.

    Prerequisite: 2 classes in Ceramics at RISD for non-majors

  3. Ceramic Sculpture

    Ceramic Sculpture will cover a range of concepts, traditions and techniques that are specific to the disciplines of both ceramics and sculpture. Projects will revolve around the topics of space, structure and form and the development of ideas. Techniques and processes including hand building, surface treatment and glazes will be covered. Clay is a subtle material allowing an exchange between the medium and the self. Through making, your skills and confidence will develop giving you more control over the objects you wish to realize. Students will approach these dynamics through installation, large construction and small-scale object making. Designed for students at an advanced level, using clay as a primary material and involving a variety of processes and forming methods.

    Major requirement; Ceramic majors

    Registration by Ceramic Department, course not available via web registration.

    Open to non-majors as elective for 3 credits; Department Head permission required.

  4. Collaborative Study

    A Collaborative Study Project (CSP) allows two students to work collaboratively to complete a faculty supervised project of indepedndent study.

    Usually, a CSP is supervised by two faculty members, but with approval it may be supervised by one faculty member. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses, though it is not a substitute for a course if that course is regularly offered.

  5. First Year Graduate Studio Ceramics

    In the first semester, graduate students begin their investigation and produce clay works that allow the faculty to assess their approach and capabilities. Students are available and pursue active contact with the faculty. Students also attend supplemental department presentations.

    Graduate major requirement; Ceramics majors only

    Registration by Ceramics Department, course not available via web registration.

  6. ISP Major

    The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses.

    Permission of instructor and GPA of 3.0 or higher is required.

    Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; the course is not available via web registration.

  7. Moldmaking & Slipcasting For Ceramics

    In this class we will utilize an industrial approach and integrate it with a fine art sensibility. Students will learn how to make molds and prototypes; produce porcelain casting slip; strategies in casting; traditional and non-traditional surface applications. Course projects will focus on non-functional concepts.

    Many tools are supplied, however,students are required to purchase a tool kit to supplement those already on hand.

    Major requirement; Ceramics majors

    Open to non-majors by permission of Instructor.

  8. Object As Idea In Clay

    An exploration and development of personal ideas and vision with their materialization in clay. An introduction to the techniques of handbuilding focusing on clay as a sculptural medium.

    Major requirement; Ceramics majors

    Open to non-majors pending seat availability and permission of instructor.

  9. Professional Internship

    The professional Internship provides valuable exposure to a professional setting, enabling students to better establish a career path and define practical aspirations. Internship proposals are carefully vetted to determine legitimacy and must meet the contact hour requirements listed in the RISD Course Announcement.

  10. Second Yr.grad Studio Ceramics

    Continued exploration begun during the first year leads to the presentation of a thesis project. Students work during class hours to ensure daily contact with faculty.

    Graduate major requirement; Ceramics majors only

    Registration by Ceramics Department, course not available via web registration.

  11. Seminar: Source Presentation

    This class helps you to develop the vocabulary of concepts relating your work to your sources. A number of exercises are undertaken culminating in a presentation of your ideas.

    Major requirement; Ceramics majors only

    Cross-listed with Ceramics

    Open to non-majors pending seat availability and permission of department required.

    Registration by Ceramics Department, course not available via web registration.

  12. Senior Tutorial Studio

    In the beginning of your fourth year you work independently with a ceramic faculty tutor to develop your individual degree project. Your project is expected to be a body of ceramic work that is unified in direction, significant in its degree of growth, innovative in its resolution, and personal in its expression.

    Major requirement; Ceramics majors only

    Registration by Ceramics department, course not available via web registration.

  13. Topic In Ceramic Material Science:grad

    A seminar exploring ceramic method and expression from technical perspectives. A study of raw materials including clay, clay bodies, and glaze calculation. The focus is the connection between technical development, and aesthetic expression. In-depth independent research required. A materials diary kept.

    Graduate major requirement; Ceramics majors

    Registration by Ceramics Department, course not available via web registration.

    Open to non-majors pending seat availability and permission of department required.

  14. Topics In Ceramic History

    A seminar exploring idea, method, and expression as found in the history of ceramic art. The focus is the potential connection between historical awareness and the development of your own work. Independent research is required.

    Major requirement; Ceramics majors

    Open to non-majors as an elective pending seat availability and permission of instructor.

    Registration by Ceramics department, course not available via web registration.

  15. Topics In Ceramic History: Graduate

    A seminar exploring ceramic method and expression from historical and contemporary perspectives. The focus is the connection between historical awareness, and aesthetic expression in the student's work. In-depth independent research required.

    Graduate major requirement; Ceramics majors

    Registration by Ceramics Department, course not available via web registration.

    Open to non-majors pending seat availability and permission of department required.

  16. Topics In Ceramic Material Science

    A seminar exploring ceramic idea, method, and expression in ceramic art from the technical perspective. Raw materials, clay bodies, glazes and glaze calculation are studied. The potential connection between technical understanding and the fulfillment of your vision and aesthetic expression is examined. Independent research is required.

    Major requirement; Ceramics sophomores

    Registration by Ceramics Department, course not available via web registration.

    Open to non-majors as an elective pending seat availability and permission of instructor.

Wintersession 2018

  1. Ceramic Form And Surface

    2D vs. 3D, form vs. surface. Investigation of how form suggests the surface and how surface can redefine the form. Various hand building and decorative processes are used.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00

  2. Ceramic Sculpture:non-majors

    The course explores an extensive range of sculptural possibilities for ceramics through the theme of sampling. Students learn basic ceramic construction including handbuilding and moldmaking. Projects include: transformation of found shapes, images or objects, abstraction and introduction to contemporary ceramic sculpture. The emphasis is on experimentation and development of personal ideas.

  3. Pottery

    Students explore the pottery making processes of throwing, jiggering, extruding, casting, and pressing. They test and experiment creating the ceramic surfaces from a variety of high temperature glaze and firing techniques. They establish and challenge the creative and expressive potentials of utility.

  4. Written Thesis 2nd Yr. Grads

    The purpose of this course is to prepare a written thesis. You will be required to develop an outline, bibliography, and first and second drafts. Completion and presentation will be during the following spring semester.

    This course is reserved for and required of second-year MFA Ceramics majors.

    Schedule individually arranged with instructor.

Spring 2018

  1. Advanced Individual Projects In Ceramics

    This course is designed for advanced students (seniors and graduate students) working to develop individual projects using ceramics. Students will be asked for a detailed proposal of their project and goals for completion to enter the class. Non-majors will need to have completed 3 ceramics courses at RISD and have permission from the instructor.

    Projects include design and fine arts applications. Topics to explore are large scale construction, advanced production methods, advanced glaze formulation, experimental firing techniques...

    Elective

    Open to senior and above.

    Permission of Instructor required.

  2. Clay In Context: Special Project

    In this class you will find a site, a venue, a place from which your investigations will spring. Working from the tradition and need of tableware; or architectural ornamentation; or public art, you will attach your personal expressive needs and vision to uses outside of the studio. Creative and inventive individual solutions arestressed. All ceramic techniques and processes appropriate may be used. Collaboration is encouraged. Designed for students at an advanced level, using clay as a primary material and involving a variety of processes and forming methods.

    Major requirement; Ceramics majors

    Registration by Ceramics Department, course no available via web registration.

    Also offered to non-majors as NMSE-4106 for 3 credits; Department permission required.

  3. Drawing Takes Form

    Drawing is explored through ceramic techniques. This class serves to enhance the artist's perceptions relative to what drawing can become through the exploration of surface becoming form, and form mediated by surface. Drawing can be premeditation and drawing can be realization.

  4. Figure Modeling

    A posed model will serve as the visual base from which students will compose and articulate 3-dimensional form in clay. Class projects include a series of small standing figures, a portrait, and a series of larger figures or large fragments of figures. Students will learn to build armatures and use clay modeling tools effectively. Outside assignments include skull study, a hand study and drawings from figurative sculpture found in and around Providence. Strong emphasis is given both to whole sight and to abstraction of essentials - proportion, spatial relationship, and axial orientation.

    Major requirement; Ceramics sophomores

    Registration by Ceramics Department, course not available via web registration.

    Open to non-majors as elective.

  5. First Year Graduate Studio Ceramics

    The second semester is a development of the ideas and work begun in the first. Students are available and pursue active contact with the faculty. Students also attend supplemental department presentations.

    Graduate major requirement; Ceramics majors only

    Registration by Ceramics Department, course not available via web registration.

  6. Graduate Thesis, Ceramics

    Continued exploration begun during the first year leads to the presentation of a thesis project. Students work during class hours to ensure daily contact with faculty.

    Graduate major requirement; Ceramics majors only

    Registration by Ceramics Department, course not available via web registration.

  7. Introduction To Ceramics For Design Majors

    Introduction to Ceramics for Design Majors would condense the sophomore ceramics curriculum so that design students can enroll in other ceramics-based courses, insuring that the sequence builds on prior knowledge. After this introductory course design majors will be better equipped to take Slip Casting, Advanced Pottery and Production, and Tableware. Interested students could take the science course for a more in depth understanding of the material.

    Information to be covered in Introduction to Ceramics for Design Majors

    . Basic hand building techniques

    . Basic mold making for slip casting and pressing. Proper use of plaster and the plaster room

    . Basic clay and glaze formulation - proper use of the glaze room and clay making facilities.

    . Basic firing processes and understanding the effects of different kiln temperatures and atmospheres.

    . Use of 3d design technology and ceramics - marriage of traditional techniques and new technology

    Open to Industrial Design sophomores and juniors

    Permission of Department Head Required.

  8. Pottery

    Students explore the pottery making processes of throwing, jiggering, extruding, casting, and pressing. They test and experiment creating the ceramic surfaces from a variety of high temperature glaze and firing techniques. They establish and challenge the creative and expressive potentials of utility.

    Major requirement; Ceramics majors only

    Registration by Ceramics Department, course not available via web registration.

    Open to non-majors as an elective with permission by the Department.

  9. Senior Thesis

    The second semester is a continuation of the senior degree project begun in the Fall. The work and ideas are further developed and refined for final presentation at the Woods-Gerry Gallery.

    Major requirement; Ceramic majors only

    Registration by Ceramics Department, course not available via web registration.

Departments

Apparel Design Architecture Ceramics Digital + Media Experimental and Foundation Studies Film / Animation / Video Furniture Design Glass Graduate Studies Graphic Design History of Art + Visual Culture History, Philosophy + the Social Sciences Illustration Industrial Design Interior Architecture Jewelry + Metalsmithing Landscape Architecture Literary Arts + Studies Painting Photography Printmaking Sculpture Teaching + Learning in Art + Design Textiles