Courses

Curriculum

pdf icon3 Yr MLA-I Curriculum for Landscape Architecture 2013-14   pdf icon2 Yr MLA-II Curriculum in Landscape Architecture 2013-14

 

Courses

Fall Semester 2014
  • LDAR-22ST

    ADVANCED DESIGN STUDIO ELECTIVE

    Credits: 6.00

    These studios, which are required for graduation, are offered by individual instructors to students who have successfully completed the core curriculum. They are assigned by lottery on the first day of classes.
    Major requirement; LDAR majors only
    Registration by Landscape Architecture Design department; course not available via web registration
    Fee: Some advanced studios have a fee for course supplies or field trips. The fee is announced during the registration lottery held in the department
  • LDAR-2204

    CONSTRUCTED LANDSCAPES STUDIO

    Credits: 6.00

    This core studio stresses middle scale landscape architectural design. A series of studio problems will explore urban public spaces. Students will endeavor to represent contemporary cultural and ecological ideas in land form. There will be an emphasis on constructive strategies, the use of plants in design and methods of representation.
    Major requirement; LDAR majors only
    Registration by Landscape Architecture Design department, course not available via web registration
    Estimated cost of materials: $350.00
  • LDAR-2201

    DESIGN PRINCIPLES

    Credits: 6.00

    This course explores design principles central to landscape architecture. Three interrelated aspects of design are pursued: 1) the elements of composition and their formal, spatial, and tectonic manipulation, 2) meanings conveyed by formal choices and transformations and 3) interactions of cultural and ecological forces in the landscape.
    Major requirement; LDAR majors only
    Registration by Landscape Architecture Design department, course not available via web registration
  • LAEL-LE44

    HISTORY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

    Credits: 3.00

    This survey course focuses on the history of landscapes in the pre-industrialized world. Landscapes will be considered as an evolving condition, even when their defining characteristics were conceived and built at a specific point in time. Critical to this course will be the establishment of frameworks for historical inquiry, the refinement of research methodologies, in the development of multiple perspectives through which to question and understand the design environment.
    Art History credit for Landscape Architecture majors required; Liberal Arts elective credit for nonmajors on a space available basis.
  • LDAR-LE44

    HISTORY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

    Credits: 3.00

    This survey course focuses on the history of landscapes in the pre-industrialized world. Landscapes will be considered as an evolving condition, even when their defining characteristics were conceived and built at a specific point in time. Critical to this course will be the establishment of frameworks for historical inquiry, the refinement of research methodologies, in the development of multiple perspectives through which to question and understand the design environment.
    Major required; LDAR majors only
    Registration by Landscape Design department, course not available via web registration
    Also offered as LAEL LE44,Liberal Arts elective credit, for non-majors on a space available basis.
    NCS concentrators encouraged.
  • LDAR-2252

    PLANT MATERIALS

    Credits: 3.00

    Botanical topics relating to a general understanding of plant growth, classification, and horticultural and arboricultural practices. Course work will include a further understanding of plant communities, plant identifications, and an introduction to planting design.
    Major requirement; LDAR majors only
    Registration by Landscape Architecture Design department, course not available via web registration; Open to non-majors by permission of Instructor
  • LDAR-2264

    REPRESENTATION I

    Credits: 3.00

    This course develops the different levels of dexterity and control in the construction of architectural drawing. The pedagogy allows for students to build a basic understanding of orthographic drawing typologies and traditional drawing methods while preparing them for more complex hybridized drawing methods. A parallel segment of the course addresses freehand representation, developing observation and translation tools necessary to design. Through these multiple approaches, drawing is developed as a tool to transform conceptual ideas into tangible form. The class will be taught as a series of lectures that discuss both why and how we draw accompanied by skill building workshops.
    Major requirement; LDAR majors only
    Registration by Landscape Architecture Design department, course not available via web registration; Open to non-majors by permission of Instructor
  • LDAR-2266

    T&M II: SITE ENGINEERING

    Credits: 3.00

    This course is a continuation of Technology & Materials I with emphasis on grading, drainage, construction details and layout. Other topics include surveying, road alignment, and storm water management strategies.
    Major requirement; LDAR majors only; Open non majors by permission of the instructor.
    Registration by Landscape Architecture Design department, course not available via web registration
  • LDAR-2254

    T&M III:ADVANCED CONSTRUCTION

    Credits: 3.00

    This course deals with advanced problems in landscape construction, materials, and site engineering, focusing on best management practices: infiltration basins, bio-swales, rain gardens, retention and detention basins, stream day-lighting, etc. There is a semester long site design development. Each student produces a booklet that explain their site analysis, design concept, grading plan, schematic planting, and river edge remediation.
    Major requirement; LDAR majors only
    Registration by Landscape Architecture Design department, course not available via web registration
  • LDAR-2251

    TECHNOLOGY & MATERIALS I: MATERIALS AND GRADING

    Credits: 3.00

    This course addresses the fundamental characteristics of materials that constitute a landscape: soil, plants, water, wood, concrete, asphalt, etc., and their use in complex assemblies as structures, enclosures and land forms. The last half of the semester will focus on the integration of materials into the landscape primarily through an understanding of topography, contours, and grading.
    Major requirement; LDAR majors only; Open to non-majors by permission of Instructor.
    Registration by Landscape Architecture Design department, course not available via web registration
  • LDAR-225G

    THEORY I

    Credits: 3.00

    Landscape is a term that can refer to a specific locale, design or even a collection of ideas, and political or ideological landscape. The term almost always implies a visual order, involving both cultural forces and natural forces. We are concerned with ideological aspects in terms of representational structure, especially the connection between visual and verbal representations of landscape, including texts, pictures, films, current media and built landscape case studies. Writing assignments will be based upon fundamental, critical texts and words and images from current media.
    Graduate major requirement; LDAR majors only
    Registration by Landscape Architecture department, course not available via web registration
    Open to qualified undergraduates and non-majors by instructor permission
  • LDAR-226G

    THEORY II

    Credits: 3.00

    This seminar explores how theory and design can be mutually informing through discussions of built work in relationship to theoretical writings. Students will identify the works and issues to be covered and lead class discussions. This seminar initiates the thesis process by asking students to formulate their own proposals for research through design.
    Graduate major requirement; LDAR majors only
    Registration by Landscape Architecture Design department, course not available via web registration
Wintersession 2015
  • LDAR-2342

    *SRI LANKA: NORTHERN VISIONS SRI LANKA

    Credits: 3.00

    This travel course will explore the rich architectural, landscape and artisan traditions of the island nation of Sri Lanka. Located just 22 miles across the Palk Strait from the southeastern coast of India, the island has a long and rich history of settlement dating back to at least the 6th C BCE. People from West Bengal, Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Portugal, the Netherlands and England have arrived, conquered and stayed, leaving an elaborate tapestry of artistic traditions, religions and customs.
    We will visit the Buddhist stupas and lakes of Anuradhapura, ancient capital of the Kingdom of Sri Lanka, dating to the late 4th C BCE, and the Buddhist temples of Kandy, last capital of independent Sri Lanka founded in the 14th C and nestled in the central highlands. There we will explore the 19th-early 20th C hillside homes and verdant tea plantations of the British colonizers and the ancient stone rainwater harvesting tanks and cascading irrigation systems. We will visit the Portuguese Fort and Dutch city of Galle on the southern coast and study works of the great Sri Lankan modern architect Geoffrey Bawa and his disciples in the capital Colombo and across the southern parts of the island. En route we will visit village textile cooperatives and artisan cottage industries to see how these traditions are being kept alive and how they are part of larger strategies aimed at social and economic empowerment.
    The goal of the course is to create an annotated visual documentation of ancient through contemporary architectural, landscape and artisan practices in Sri Lanka. These will include siting strategies, material and structural studies, climate control and resource management systems, spatial layouts and use patterns, and artisan processes. The entire Wintersession period will be spent in Sri Lanka with regular work sessions for compilation of data and observations built into the trip.
    Note: This course is part of a multi-year RISD involvement with Sri Lanka through DESINE-Lab@RISD. The larger effort focuses on the northern region of the island and the reconstruction and refugee resettlement process following the country's three-decade civil war. While the material produced in the course is a critical component of the larger effort and there will be DESINE-Lab members running workshops in conflict-impacted areas in the weeks prior to Wintersession, this travel course will NOT be going to the north of the country.
    Permission of Instructor required.
    Open to Sophomores and Above.
    Estimated Travel Cost: $3000.00. $686.00 due at registration time.
  • LDAR-W207

    GRAD SEM:CONSTRUCTED GROUND

    Credits: 6.00

    This seminar explores the parallels between designing and constructing the ground. It's focus is on landform - analyzing it as part of a larger natural system; understanding its inherent opportunities and limitations; altering it for human use & occupation; and building it with varying construction methodologies.
    The means for this exploration will primarily be through three-dimensional representations with two dimensional contour plans; however, diagrams, sketches, sections, and narratives will be necessary throughout the semester.
    Graduate; Restricted to MLA students; LDAR majors only
    Nonmajors by permission of instructor
  • LDAR-W217

    RESEARCH METHODS FOR DESIGN

    Credits: 3.00

    This seminar introduces a spectrum of research methodologies meaningful to design disciplines focusing on the intersection of the human, built and natural worlds - approaches stemming for the social sciences, environmental sciences, and design practice. Students will work through a variety of written and visual means to explore differences between, and uses of, quantitative and qualitative data collection, analysis, interpretation, and application. Methods to be explored include Grounded Theory, Phenomenological Inquiry, Participatory approaches, Ethnography, Comparative approaches, Case Study, Postmodern Critical Theory, Systems Theory, survey, narrative, typologies, experimentation, modeling, matrices, mapping, design as research, and social and environmental impact assessment and evaluation. Special attention will be paid to issues of causality, generalization, values and ethics.
    The class will be organized around a set of related issues water, ground and poverty, with a focus on the city of Providence. There will be two phases of research with the class participants determining the over-riding research question. Each phase will involve teamwork where teams will utilize different research methodologies to examine the same basic question, and will include written and visual documentation, analysis and interpretation. At the end of each phase, students will explore the differences between the various methodologies and their outcomes and discuss when and how certain approaches and their combination may be more or less effective as part of the practice, critique and scholarship of design.
    This graduate seminar meets two days a week, three hours each. It is required for all first-year students in Landscape Architecture.
    Open to Graduate Level only.
Spring Semester 2015
  • LDAR-2257

    ECOLOGICAL PLANNING & DESIGN

    Credits:

    This course instructs landscape architects and students from other disciplines in collecting, interpreting and mapping landscape site data, both natural and cultural, in order to program and design new uses. Employing diverse projects, from specific sites to municipal and regional contexts, it offers experience in site analysis, mapping, air photo interpretation, planning report preparation, programming for site development, and an introduction to GIS.
    Graduate major requirement for three-year MLA program; LDAR majors only; Open to non-majors by permission of Instructor.
    Registration by Landscape Architecture Design department, course not available via web registration
    Brown University students are encouraged to participate
  • LDAR-228G

    GRADUATE THESIS

    Credits: 9.00

    Development of a directed group or individual project in response to defined objectives, critical commentary of advisory panels and periodic formal reviews. Three forms of presentation occur: final review, Museum presentation and exhibition, and project book.
    Major requirement; LDAR majors only
    Registration by Landscape Architecture Design department, course not available via web registration
  • LAEL-LE20

    ISSUES IN LANDSCAPE HISTORY

    Credits: 3.00

    This course examines current issues raised by the design of built environments and explores the cultures, conditions, events, attitudes and design works of the past that form the ideological, physical and practical background against which today's landscapes are made, interpreted and valued. Critical to this course will be the establishment of frameworks for historical inquiry, the refinement of research methodologies, and the development of multiple perspectives through which to question and understand the designed environment.
    Major requirement; LDAR majors only
    Registration by Landscape Architecture Design department, course not available via web registration
  • LDAR-223G

    PLANNING & CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY SEMINAR

    Credits: 3.00

    Through spatial and cultural analysis this course explores the history and meaning of various geographical realities in the Western and non-Western world. A critical examination of urban, suburban and rural land-use patterns; utopian and applied planning practices; models of urban and suburban change; the role of conservation and preservation advocacy and their interface with development, settlement and ecology, allows for an evaluation of new ideas and recent experiments seen against a historical and cultural background.
    Graduate major requirement; LDAR majors only
    Registration by Landscape Architecture Design department, course not available via web registration
    Open to nonmajors & Brown University students by permission of instructor
  • LDAR-2253

    PLANTS & DESIGN

    Credits: 3.00

    This course will explore the use of plants as a design medium while balancing the horticultural considerations. There will be analyses of existing gardens, field trips, and the creation of schematic and detailed planting plans for different types of sites. Topics such as seasonality, texture, color and form will be discussed.
    Major requirement; LDAR majors only
    Registration by Landscape Architecture Design department, course not available via web registration; Open to non-majors by permission of Instructor
  • LDAR-2291

    PRINCIPLES OF PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE

    Credits: 3.00

    This is a course about becoming a licensed designer, in an era of changing models of practice, a business professional and a citizen. It is intended to prepare students for the challenges and opportunities of life as a professional designer. The course will contain lectures organized around three major themes: The designer as a trained and certified "Professional" in traditional practice, and alternative roles, the designer as an operative in the world of business and commerce, and the designer as a provider of a particular set of professional skills using traditional and emerging methods for the delivery of professional services. Invited guests as panel members will present an outside professional perspective. Panels will be composed of many practioners, coming from a wide spectrum of years of experience and professional roles. All will be asked to discuss their world as professionals, and business people. All issues presented are common to the disciplines of Architecture, Landscape, and Interiors.
    Major requirement; LDAR majors only
    Registration by Landscape Architecture department, course not available via web registration
  • LDAR-2265

    REPRESENTATION II

    Credits: 3.00

    The advanced course studies multimedia drawing through the use of freehand and computer drawing. It explores the possibilities with the material and content of two dimensional expression. The class encourages greater connections with the design studios by testing and reevaluating design work through the lens of phenomenology and seriality. Scale and composition are emphasized in the detailed and constructed drawings that are required in class. ndividual investigations are developed throughout this advanced course to encourage a way of making marks that connect with the various modes of exploration in their studio work.
    Major requirement; LDAR majors only
    Registration by Landscape Architecture Design department, course not available via web registration
    Estimated cost of materials: $225.00
  • LDAR-2203

    SITE/ECOLOGY & DESIGN STUDIO

    Credits: 6.00

    What do these words mean and what is their relationship to each other in the architectural design disciplines? Each word is packed with complex and evolving meanings that reflect the state of human knowledge about the environments in which we live and in which we intervene. Each word reflects our understanding of systems, physical, cultural and social, biotic and abiotic, as well as our aspirations to conserve, restore, or reshape those systems. Each word is ubiquitous in the contemporary quest to construct a sustainable, resilient future. But do we really understand what they mean? Are they critically interdependent or can they be considered separately?
    This studio will examine these questions with the twin objectives of establishing an evolving and dynamic understanding of the terms and generating working methods that respond to the complexities of scale encountered in the landscape.
    Major requirement; LDAR majors only
    Registration by Landscape Architecture Design department, course not available via web registration
    Estimated cost of materials: $250
  • LDAR-2205

    URBAN SYSTEMS STUDIO

    Credits: 6.00

    This final core studio stresses large-scale design and planning issues, complex sites, and urban conditions. The city is a living organism which evolves in a particular locale with a particular form due to a combination of environmental and cultural factors. These factors, the forces they represent and the material results of their interaction form, in their interrelated state, what can be called "urban systems." The many forces at play within cities-social, cultural, economic, ideological, ecological, infra structural, morphological and visual-combine in various ways to created both an identifiable urban realm and the many sub zones within this. Yet, none of these factors is static and unchanging; and, as a result, urban systems, urban dynamics, and urban identity are likewise in a continuous state of flux. This studio will explore these systems and the complex issues at play in our urban areas and the potential for positive change.
    Estimated cost of materials: $210.00
    Major requirement; LDAR majors only
    Registration by Landscape Architecture Design department, course not available via web registration


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