Fall 2017

  1. Advanced Cad

    The purpose of the course is to introduce students to advanced CAD techniques while enhancing their design processes by utilizing additional CAD applications. Extending the department's CAD education from 'Rhino workshop' and 'Designing with Solidworks,' several categories will be offered to explore further CAD applications including Rhino with plug-ins, Cinema 4D, MasterCAM with SolidWorks, and more. The specific offerings vary year to year.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00

    Major requirement; ID majors only

    Open to junior and above

    Registration by Industrial Design Department; course not available via web registration.

  2. Advanced Design: Studio

    The 6-credit Advanced Design studios offer second semester juniors and seniors the opportunity to investigate product, socially responsible, and sustainable design; innovation through science and technology and other topics in contemporary practice. These studios are designed to strengthen the student's ability to conduct research, ideation, material exploration, presentation, and concept validation. Studios meet two days per week.

    ID juniors and seniors are required to take a total of three advanced studios.

    Major requirement; ID majors only, unless specified by the instructor and/or Department Head.

    Registration of Industrial Design Department; course not available via web registration.

    Some advanced studios have a fee for course supplies or field trips. The fee and any prerequisites are announced during the department's registration lottery.

  3. Brown Univ. Prof. Elective

  4. Collaborative Study

    A Collaborative Study Project (CSP) allows a team of students to work collaboratively to complete a faculty supervised project of independent study.

    Usually, a CSP is supervised by two faculty members, but with approval it may be supervised by one faculty member. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses, though it is not a substitute for a course if that course is regularly offered.

    Permission of Academic Advisor and Department Head is required in advance of posted Registrar's deadline.

    GPA of 3.0 or higher is required.

    Register by completing the Collaborative Study Application available on the Registrar's website.

    Course not available via web-registration.

  5. Design Principles I

    This course is an introduction to conceptual and manual skills that represent necessary steps in design evolution. Students strengthen skills by completion of several processes and exercises. Critical thinking and concept generation is a primary focus, drawing and model making activities help to establish this process. Throughout the course each student will focus on improving communication skills and the ability to project or sell ideas.

    Estimated Material Cost: $15.00

    Major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design department, course not available via web registration

  6. EHP Fall: Studio Concentratio

    In this intensive independent studio students continue and complete the work began in "EHP Studio Elective", culminating in the final exhibition and review. It corresponds to the remaining four weeks of the program, after students have finished with their Art History and Italian classes.

    Note: EHP credits replace the on-campus major requirements for the term students attend. Distribution to non-major requirements occurs when major credits are not needed.

  7. EHP Studio Elective

    Independent studio is at the core of the EHP experience. Upon arrival, students are assigned studio space at the Palazzetto Cenci, home of RISD's program in Rome. With guidance from the chief critic, each student develops a personal body of work sparked by his/her interactions with places, people and circumstances in Rome and other locations that are part of the EHP tours (such as the Northern, Southern or Eastern tours, as well as other shorter trips.) The work takes as a point of departure knowledge and techniques specific to individual home departments, but allows, and even encourages, explorations beyond disciplinary boundaries, including collaborations and cross-fertilization within a group of students from different departments working together.

    Beyond consistent and thorough engagement with studio work, requirements include participation in open studios and exhibitions, presentations in reviews, and attendance to all group activities and events, such as lectures at the Cenci and other institutions. From time to time, the chief critic may issue short assignments to introduce or focus on a particular subject. As part of the studio elective, students may be encouraged to keep sketchbooks and/or diaries, participate in optional activities--such as figure drawing sessions--and search for brief internships, apprenticeships, or other forms of interactions with local artists, designers, curators and critics.

    EHP Studio Elective corresponds to the first twelve weeks of the program, while students are also taking Art History and Italian classes. This course establishes the direction for the work in the "Studio Concentration" course that follows.

    Note: EHP credits replace the on-campus major requirements for the term students attend. Distribution to non-major requirements occurs when major credits are not needed.

  8. Graduate Communication Introduction

    Graduate Communication Introduction is a studio course about writing and speaking as design tools. We think about writing and speaking in two ways. First as a communication tool and second as a design tool.

    On the communication side, we adress the many ways that writing and speaking surrounds a designed object (as a proposal, as sales copy, as instructions to users, as specs for manufacture, as criticism, etc.). We think about the audiences for those various kinds of communication and how to think about what they want and need. We look at examples of great design communication and we develop and practice our own skills for succinctly explaining our ideas.

    On the design tool side, we think about the many ways that writing can help clarify and quickly test out ideas. We think about writing as a form of rapid prototyping alongside sketching, model making, etc. We talk about what writing is good at, when other methods might be more useful, and when to combine methods. We explore techniques such as design fiction, scenario planning, and other narrative methodologies that are using in industrial design and related fields.

    Graduate major requirement; ID majors only

  9. Graduate ID Studio I

    The execution of two assigned design projects provides the framework for a thorough examination of the design process. This structured and intensive studio will focus on the relationship between the implementation of sound design methodologies and successful problem solving in the design process. This first studio experience is intended to provide the methodological infrastructure for the remainder of the M.I.D. thesis experience.

    Graduate major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design department, course not available via web registration

  10. Graduate Thesis Communications I

    Graduate Thesis Communications I is a studio course run in parallel with our sibling studio course which focuses on design research methods. Together, we will spend the fall semester casting about, planning and prototyping towards some kind of design proposal or product for execution in the spring. We think about writing in two ways. First as a design tool and second as a communication tool. On the tool for design side, we think about the many ways that writing can help clarify and quickly test out ideas. We think about writing as a form of rapid prototyping alongside sketching, model making, etc. We talk about what writing is good at, when other methods might be more useful, and when to combine methods. We use writing to help clarify and crystalize the thesis plan. On the communication side, we think about the many ways that writing surrounds a designed object (as a proposal, as sales copy, as instructions to users, as specs for manufacture, as criticism, etc.). We think about the audiences for those various kinds of writing and how to think about what they want and need. We talk about the thesis as a tool for explaining the design but also as a tool for helping you advance your career goals. At the end of the course,you will have a partially complete draft of your thesis. which will set you up for an excellent spring.

    Graduate major requirement; ID majors only

    Must also register for ID 247G

    Registration by Industrial Design department; course not available via web registration

  11. Graduate Thesis Research

    This course introduces the Graduate Thesis project starting with the development of a research question through secondary research reading methods. This question has its assumptions articulated and verified through experimental making and primary research methods that engage specific audiences for qualitative discourse.

    Graduate major requirement; ID majors only

    Must also register for ID 251G

    Registration by Industrial Design department, course not available via web registration

  12. ID Graduate Shop Orientation

    This course will acclimate new graduate students to the shop environment of the Industrial Design Department. The Metal, Wood and Model Shops are invaluable resources, clarifying pragmatic aspects of the design process from general feasibility of manufacturing to the challenges of translating concepts into tangible objects. This course covers excerpted information from both undergraduate courses Wood I and Metals I and emphasizes safety in the utilization of shop facilities.

    Graduate major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design department, course not available via web registration

  13. ISP Major

    The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses.

    Permission of Academic Advisor and Department Head is required in advance of of posted Registrar's deadline.

    GPA of 3.0 or higher is required.

    Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website.

    Course not available via web-registration.

  14. Id: Outgoing Exchange Pgm

    This course registers an outgoing exchange student into a pre-approved ID studio course which is taken at the exchange school. Successful completion of the course will result in a "T" grade once receipt of the official transcript from the partner school has arrived at Registrar's Office.

  15. Intro To Shoemaking

    Shoes are an everyday commodity; but do you know how many are steps involved? In this course, students will handcraft a basic pair of cemented construction shoes from start to finish. This includes beginning by creating a basic pattern, draping the last, cutting (clicking) the leather, sewing (closing) the upper, building a stacked leather heel, and finishing the sole. We will approach the requirements of constructing a shoe through choice of material, characteristics of leather, and how to utilize them in laying out the pattern. In the process of the construction from pattern to shoe, we will work with basic tools for handcrafted shoemaking including a shoemaker's knife, closers hammer, buff stick, lasting pincers to name a few. Students are expected to complete one pair of shoes and begin work on a second pair, applying and expanding upon the techniques learned in the class.

    ID majors only

    Also offered as APPAR 2494 for Apparel majors

  16. Manufacturing Techniques

    This course introduces the students to methods, materials, and manufacturing processes that translate design activity into finished goods. A significant portion of downstream design activity is devoted to manufacturing issues - the techniques by which materials are selected, shaped, and then assembled. Students will be evaluated based upon success of weekly field study research assignments and a final exam.

    Major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design department, course not available via web registration

  17. Metal I

    This course gives the student a hands-on opportunity to develop design skills through the interaction with industrial materials that have strictly defined properties. Experimenting with these materials and the processes by which they are manipulated and formed promotes innovative thinking, problem solving and idea development. Students will achieve a more precise, professional and sensitive approach to design while broadening their technical skill base.

    Major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design department, course not available via web registration

  18. Metal II

    The objective of this course is to develop a more precise, professional and sensitive approach to design while broadening the student's technical base. Precision machine tools such as metal lathes, millers and grinders will be introduced. Logical design and set-up approaches will be discussed. Outside design work will be required with emphasis on engineering drawing and sequence of operations. There will be a strong emphasis on experimenting with the material in order to promote innovative thinking and problem solving. Major elective; ID majors only

  19. Professional Internship

    The professional Internship provides valuable exposure to a professional setting, enabling students to better establish a career path and define practical aspirations. Internship proposals are carefully vetted to determine legitimacy and must meet the contact hour requirements listed in the RISD Course Announcement.

  20. Special Topic Design Studio

    Juniors take two 3-credit Special Topic Design Studios in the Fall semester. Juniors choose one 3-credit option from the "Content" category such as Packaging, Typography, Play, or UI/UX, and the other option from the "Process" category suh as Casting, Soft Goods or Prototyping. Students will gain multiple competencies by utilizing techniques and methodologies through practice and process. Each studio meets once per week.

    Major requirement; ID majors only.

    Permission required for non-majors.

    Registration by Industrial Design Department; course not available via web registration.

    Some studios have a lab fee for materials and field trips. The fee is announced during the department's registration lottery.

  21. Wkshp: Drawing

    In this class we practice a variety of digital and freehand methods of design exploration and visual communication used by designers. These sketching and rendering skills are ideal for anyone who has to understand and resolve form while communicating ideas within interdisciplinary environments. We will focus on the redesign of a few objects, starting with some sketching from the ideation phase through to a final solution that describes the aesthetic and emotive intents, as well as demonstrates knowledge of functional or unique manufacturing requirements. The class is built on the belief that strong two-dimensional skills remain the essential tool for product designers.

    Students attending the first module will be required to participate in the final critique on the final day of the semester.

    Open to junior and above.

  22. Wkshp: Product Photography

    This class will cover basic camera optics and lighting techniques necessary to generate high quality digital images for either print or digital portfolio applications. The focus of the class is to master manual controls on the digital camera such as film and shutter speed settings in conjunction with aperture openings to obtain whatever the desired effect might be to best represent two and three-dimensional objects. Manipulation of natural and artificial lighting is the other main focus of the class. Students will learn the use of fill and bounce cards with sun, tungsten and strobe light sources. The emphasis will be on the strobe lighting studio where through a series of assignments students will learn direct, diffused reflected lighting techniques.

    Students will be required to participate in the final critique during the final week of the semester.

    Open to junior and above.

  23. Wood I

    Philosophically, the ID Department believes that students become better designers when they have an intimate knowledge of a range of natural and synthetic materials. In this course, students will learn about the properties of natural wood and engineered wood-based materials, investigate the related technical processes, and evaluate how this information is both connected to and influenced by the design process. Students will work with materials directly and master skills needed to manipulate these materials. They will develop projects that allow them to engage in the design and development process, promote creativity, problem solving, and the correct use of materials. Facility procedures, safety, and care and use of tools and equipment will be stressed.

    Major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design department, course not available via web registration

  24. Wood II

    This course will deal with advanced woodworking processes, including milling and machinery use, laminate and steam bending, plywood and veneer. Techniques in using natural and synthetic materials connected with furniture will be covered.

    Major elective; ID majors only

Wintersession 2018

  1. Advanced Cad

    The purpose of the course is to introduce students to advanced CAD techniques while enhancing their design processes by utilizing additional CAD applications. Extending the department's CAD education from 'Rhino workshop' and 'Designing with Solidworks,' several categories will be offered to explore further CAD applications including Rhino with plug-ins, Cinema 4D, MasterCAM with SolidWorks, and more. The specific offerings vary year to year.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00

    Major requirement; ID majors only

    Open to junior and above

    Registration by Industrial Design Department; course not available via web registration.

  2. Animal Centered Design

    The industrial design field today finds itself in the middle of an ethical crisis - too many designed objects, interfaces, and systems do more harm than good with regard to people and animals and the environment that we all share. Recent shifts toward more responsible approaches to design have begun to correct this problem, but very few designers have explicitly taken the interests of animals into consideration while working, despite the fact that virtually all living ethicists believe the interests of animals are ethically relevant.

    Unlike conventional design approaches that put the interests of human users and other human stakeholders at the center of their processes, this course will explore an approach to design that de-centers humans in favor of a broader understanding of whose interests design can and should serve. This course will be informed by a broad range of animal ethics and environmental ethics readings, while also examining how a contemporary scientific understanding of humans as animals with innate qualities can improve design outcomes for human users. Student work in this course will exist within and across the "four fields" of industrial design that are emphasized within the ID Department - speculative, experimental, responsible, and commercial.

    The course will be divided into three related but discrete modules.

    The first module, Design for Animals, will focus on animals (pets, farmed animals, shelter animals, and wildlife) as users and collaborators. It should be noted that a strict code of conduct and ethics will be observed in the course to ensure that no animals are harmed in the process of conducting this course.

    The second module, Design without Animals, will seek a better understanding of design's negative impact on animals, both within systems of production (farmed animals) and outside (wildlife), and will explore existing and emerging technologies (e.g., new materials) that reduce animal suffering and increase animal well-being as an outcome of design processes. This module will include a review of literature regarding the effects of animal-based manufacturing on humans (e.g., environmental toxins and occupational chemical exposure associated with leather tanning).

    Readings in this course will come from accessible literature in the fields of behavioral economics, engineering psychology, positive psychology, human-animal studies (HAS or ethnozoology), evolutionary psychology, behavior design, cognitive/neuro-ergonomics, and design psychology. Additionally, readings will be supplemented with visiting speakers and documentary films.

    Estimated Material Cost $50.00

  3. Autonomous Vehicle Futures

    In this course, students will envision future scenarios where self-driving vehicles are operating and prevalent. This course will focus on the physical and digital user experiences of a self-driving vehicle. Students will create a suite of user experience designs pertaining to the interior of the vehicle. Students will also gain exposure to strategy and in a much broader sense - interaction design. We will also speculate about what kinds of infrastructure and systems will be necessary for a future with self-driving vehicles based on a given scenario. This course will work with gathering insights from research, strategy and to utilize design fiction & speculation and physical/digital fabrication in our final projects. Students will conduct user research to understand hesitations, concerns and/or excitement about the future of self-driving vehicles. The user research will culminate into designing user experiences (both physical & digital) that address the user's needs. This is not an automotive design course. We will focus on the interior space of a vehicle and the presentation of that space.

    Estimated Material Cost $450

  4. Designing With Emotional Intelligence

    Humans are weird.

    Designers are expected to understand and advocate for human needs through user research, but it's hard to know what to ask, how to ask it, and how to share it. In support with IBM Design, this course will introduce students to design-thinking practices and research techniques and methods that will help them more thoughtfully observe, understand, and advocate for human needs as designers.

    Students will gain practical experience applying IBM Design Thinking process tools as teams to projects that affect our RISD community. We will explore how to ask good questions and navigate the difficulties of truly listening to people whose experiences are different from our own. User research will be captured in visual tools such as empathy maps, personas, experience maps, and storyboarding. Insights from these activities will inform low-fidelity prototypes of solutions, which can take the form of wire-frames, 2D or 3D models, and/or designed experiences. Regular presentations will give students the chance to practice visual and spoken storytelling skills.

    This course is open to students of all disciplines and levels, but it will be most useful for people who are: curious about the world of design research; uncertain or skeptical how user research can inform design process; unsure how qualitative research is different from a bunch of anecdotes; or looking for support communicating the value of their ideas to non-designers.

  5. Food + Design

    This course will explore the synergy between food and design. By combining industrial design thinking and skills to food, we will find new ways of approaching the culinary arts. Students will start with a simple raw ingredient and reimagine its potential across all five senses.

    Students will use food as the primary material and digital fabrication as a facilitator to enhance the experience of eating. 3D modelling software is just one of the ways students may explore the relationship between technology and food. As a Co-Works class, students will have access to all of the fabrication equipment in the space, giving them the freedom to experiment with unexpected materials.

    Throughout the semester we will study existing models of chefs and designers contributing to the global food design movement. We will work closely with local chefs and food chemists in Providence to gain a greater understanding of their creative process. This course will culminate in an exhibit of culinary experimental designs.

  6. Grad Intro To Industrial Design

    The aim of the course is to open a window on the complex and multifaceted present design environment. A preliminary overview about the major historic design movements will be followed by an extensive description of the design's state of the art together with a spot on the latest trends. Students will be invited to think and tinker, learning how to approach a design project, how to formulate proper research questions and how to use analog and digital prototyping to experiment, validate and communicate their own ideas. They will also initiate a dialogue with forms, functions, and interactions, defining the borders of the design activity and the actual role of designers. The main goal of the course is to get students familiar with the design vocabulary and with the basic tools involved in design processes.

    Areas covered: Ideas and concepts creation, quantitative and qualitative research, sketch models making, digital fabrication, physical computing, project's narrative and storytelling.

    Open to ID Graduate Majors only.

  7. Intro To Industrial Design

    In this product design studio, we will dissect an existing product, analyze a market segment, and redesign the product to fit the described market. The methodology used to complete this task will be accelerated, giving students an overview of a typical industrial design process. Students will be exposed to design drawing techniques, foam modeling methods, and the concept of designing for consumers.

  8. Introduction To Biomimicry

    Biomimicry is innovation through emulation of biological forms, processes, patterns, and systems. It is motivated by an understanding of natural selection, a process through which advantageous traits are perpetuated as organisms best-adapted to their environments survive and reproduce in greater numbers than those with less effective adaptations. Over billions of years, natural selection has culled high-performing, resource-efficient survival strategies, which we can learn from to solve our technical challenges. This three credit seminar will introduce students to biomimicry. Students will complete the course with 1) a basic understanding of biomimicry, 2) a knowledge of biomimetic applications to diverse problems; 3) a deeper understanding of the approaches to bio-inspired design; and 4) firsthand experience with the early stages of biomimicry (problem definition, function specification, biological model identification, and design principle extraction). The syllabus will include immersive field trips to natural areas.

  9. Irrational Design

    "When it comes to making decisions in our lives, we think we're making smart, rational choices, but are we? Why do our headaches persist after we take a one-cent aspirin but disappear when we take a fifty-cent aspirin? Why do we splurge on a lavish meal but cut coupons to save twenty-five cents on a can of soup? From drinking coffee to losing weight, from buying a car to choosing a romantic partnerm we consistently overpay, underestimate, and procrastinate. Yet these misguided behaviors are neither random or senseless. They are systematic and predictable---making us predictably irrational".

    As designers, how might we study, understand and leverage our irrationality to advance positive design outcomes? We will read excerpts of "Thinking Fast and Slow" from Daniel Kahneman (Nobel Prize Winner notable for his work on the psychology of judgement and decision-making, as well as behavioral economics)and Dan Ariely, New York Times best sellers such as "Predictably Irrational" and "Payoff: The Hidden Logic That Shapes Our Motivations".

    We will brainstorm and design experiments to incorporate these theories into everyday products and services to augment, challenge and advance our thinking on design and psychology.

  10. Metal II

    The objective of this course is to develop a more precise, professional and sensitive approach to design while broadening the student's technical base. Precision machine tools such as metal lathes, millers and grinders will be introduced. Logical design and set-up approaches will be discussed. Outside design work will be required with emphasis on engineering drawing and sequence of operations. There will be a strong emphasis on experimenting with the material in order to promote innovative thinking and problem solving. Major elective; ID majors only

  11. Sustainable Design For The Near Future

    Imagine what you would need to live the sustainable lifestyle of your dreams and build it.

    Research and experimentation are the cornerstones of transformative and enduring design. The thinking and tinkering we undertake now becomes the more economical and ecologically balanced future that we all inhabit. Accessible in-home composting, vertical gardens, passive heating/cooling systems and many more are tangible and evolving exemplars of how intricate systems are strengthened by well-researched, iterated and user-tested design. Using 3D printing technologies, rapid-prototyping methods, and traditional building skills students will realize a multitude of types of projects to address sustainable design.

    In this course, students will engage in cradle-to-cradle thinking to design products and systems that promote and facilitate the easy adoption of more sustainable habits. Students will be tasked to prototype and test their concepts during the design process. This heavily process-oriented course emphasizes the value of user-research, testing and iterative design. At the end of the course, students will have a complete design/concept (**ready to shop for publication).

    Through weekly discussions of environmental challenges and recent innovations, we aim to focus our speculative designs within the realm of real world challenges. We will meet local community-members with active sustainable lifestyles, in order to learn from their experiences and inform our designs.

    As a cross-disciplinary Co-Works course, in addition to engaging with sustainable community members, we will also collaborate with faculty from the Nature Lab, Landscape Architecture, and Interior Architecture.

    Estimated Material Cost $50.00

  12. Thesis Open Research

    This course is for industrial design graduate students in their final year to work independently on their graduate thesis. The instructor serves an advisory and support role in all projects. Students must submit for instructor agreement, a written proposal for work planned and the criteria for evaluation. Course meetings are arranged individually, and / or with the group as needed. Graduate major elective; Industrial Design thesis graduates only.

    Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.

  13. Wkshp: Drawing

    In this class we practice a variety of digital and freehand methods of design exploration and visual communication used by designers. These sketching and rendering skills are ideal for anyone who has to understand and resolve form while communicating ideas within interdisciplinary environments. We will focus on the redesign of a few objects, starting with some sketching from the ideation phase through to a final solution that describes the aesthetic and emotive intents, as well as demonstrates knowledge of functional or unique manufacturing requirements. The class is built on the belief that strong two-dimensional skills remain the essential tool for product designers.

    Students attending the first module will be required to participate in the final critique on the final day of the semester.

    Open to junior and above.

  14. Wkshp: Product Photography

    This class will cover basic camera optics and lighting techniques necessary to generate high quality digital images for either print or digital portfolio applications. The focus of the class is to master manual controls on the digital camera such as film and shutter speed settings in conjunction with aperture openings to obtain whatever the desired effect might be to best represent two and three-dimensional objects. Manipulation of natural and artificial lighting is the other main focus of the class. Students will learn the use of fill and bounce cards with sun, tungsten and strobe light sources. The emphasis will be on the strobe lighting studio where through a series of assignments students will learn direct, diffused reflected lighting techniques.

    Students will be required to participate in the final critique during the final week of the semester.

    Open to junior and above.

  15. Wood II

    The intent of this course is to advance the student's knowledge of wood working techniques, processes and a sensitivity to wood. In this course, the table saw, joiner and planer are introduced along with advanced techniques using plywood and solid wood construction including veneering, joinery, bending and shaping. The design process will be explored through building. Technical demonstrations will be followed by a series of woodworking projects.

    Estmiated Material Cost: $30.00

    ID majors only

Spring 2018

  1. Advanced Cad

    The purpose of the course is to introduce students to advanced CAD techniques while enhancing their design processes by utilizing additional CAD applications. Extending the department's CAD education from 'Rhino workshop' and 'Designing with Solidworks,' several categories will be offered to explore further CAD applications including Rhino with plug-ins, Cinema 4D, MasterCAM with SolidWorks, and more. The specific offerings vary year to year.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00

    Major requirement; ID majors only

    Open to junior and above

    Registration by Industrial Design Department; course not available via web registration.

  2. Advanced Design: Studio

    The 6-credit Advanced Design studios offer second semester juniors and seniors the opportunity to investigate product, socially responsible, and sustainable design; innovation through science and technology and other topics in contemporary practice. These studios are designed to strengthen the student's ability to conduct research, ideation, material exploration, presentation, and concept validation. Studios meet two days per week.

    ID juniors and seniors are required to take a total of three advanced studios.

    Major requirement; ID majors only, unless specified by the instructor and/or Department Head.

    Registration of Industrial Design Department; course not available via web registration.

    Some advanced studios have a fee for course supplies or field trips. The fee and any prerequisites are announced during the department's registration lottery.

  3. Business Principles: Design And Entrepreneurship

    Turning an idea into a sustainable reality requires a fundamental understanding of business, but the frameworks that guide business principles overlap, complement, and enhance design principles.

    This course seeks to educate students to understand business as a critical design factor-- a defining constraint or liberating perspective along the same lines that other design principles are taught.

    The guiding principle is that design and business are inextricably linked: Design work is intrinsically linked to business and will always be at the service of business, fulfilling the need for an enterprise (profit or non-profit) whose business model is critical to its survival. Design will find new channels, new outlets, through a more complete understanding of business needs and how businesses see opportunity. Design can and should be considered as critical strategic input for business

    The objective of Business Principles: Design and Entrepreneurship is for students to understand basic business vocabulary, to explore how design vocabulary and design processes overlap, complement and enhance business vocabulary, and to understand how design thinking skills can be used to identify and execute business opportunities.

    This course will consist of a series of lectures, readings and case studies from the Harvard Business School.

    Major elective; ID majors only

  4. Design Principles II

    This course is a continuation of Design Principles (ID-2464) with an emphasis on problem solving and design process and skills.

    Major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design department, course not available via web registration

  5. Designing With Solidworks

    The purpose of this course is to expose students to SolidWorks, a widely used solid modeling software program. Students will learn how to translate their hand-sketches into three-dimensional CAD models. Lectures and assignments will focus on the development of form as it applies to plastic part design and assembly. Physical models will be realized through ABS rapid prototyping allowing students to experience true plastic part design.

    Students should anticipate additional costs for supplies and materials.

    Major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.

  6. Encoding Objects: Experiments In Meaning And Method

    In this seminar, we will be exploring and experimenting with the different ways that objects encode meaning. Delving into texts from a wide variety of disciplines, like aesthetics and anthropology, we will then apply their different philosophical approaches to experiments in physical object design. Stitching back and forth between practice and theory, we will build a broad understanding of the object's role and impact beyond the strictly utilitarian, laying the foundation for critical discourse in your graduate work and beyond. This course will focus on readings as they relate to the field of design, but it is open to graduate students from all disciplines.

    Graduate elective

  7. Graduate Communication Introduction

    Graduate Communication Introduction is a studio course about writing and speaking as design tools. We think about writing and speaking in two ways. First as a communication tool and second as a design tool.

    On the communication side, we adress the many ways that writing and speaking surrounds a designed object (as a proposal, as sales copy, as instructions to users, as specs for manufacture, as criticism, etc.). We think about the audiences for those various kinds of communication and how to think about what they want and need. We look at examples of great design communication and we develop and practice our own skills for succinctly explaining our ideas.

    On the design tool side, we think about the many ways that writing can help clarify and quickly test out ideas. We think about writing as a form of rapid prototyping alongside sketching, model making, etc. We talk about what writing is good at, when other methods might be more useful, and when to combine methods. We explore techniques such as design fiction, scenario planning, and other narrative methodologies that are using in industrial design and related fields.

    Graduate major requirement; ID majors only

  8. Graduate ID Studio II

    The second studio experience in the MID program focuses on interpretation as a crucial component of problem solving in the design process. Nine thematic briefs are provided, from which students select two. Subsequent design projects represent the students' considered position on the relevance of the selected theme to contemporary design practice. The range of themes explored in the class broadens the critical discourse on issues pertinent to the field of Industrial Design and provides a segue way to the students' declaration of thesis topics.

    Graduate major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design department, course not available via web registration

  9. Graduate Thesis Communications II

    Graduate Thesis Communications II is a studio course run in parallel with our sibling studio course which focuses on completing your thesis. Together, we will spend the spring semester finishing the thesis and thesis book that you proposed at the end of Graduate Thesis Communications I. We continue to think about writing as a design tool and as a communication tool. For this course, we put more emphasis on the communication aspect. Together, we will continue to refine and strengthen the manner by which you explain your thesis to yourself and others. We will think about audience, voice, structure, and form. We will explore different ways of communicating the same idea in different contexts and mediums (visual, oral, written). We will examine how to share our work and with whom. At the end of the course, you will have a complete thesis.

    Major requirement, ID graduate students only.

    This is a co-requisite course. Students must also plan and register for ID-248G.

  10. Graduate Thesis Making

    This course concludes the Graduate Thesis through iterative prototyping, application and verification that positions and delivers a human-centered, discpline-engaging proposal that will be communicated through an exhibition format, product, product prototype and a final Graduate Thesis document.

    Graduate major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design department, course not available via web registration.

    This is a co-requisite course. Students must also plan and register for ID-250G.

  11. History Of Industrial Design

    History is a powerful tool; a basic understanding of the history of design and familiarity with important design movements and designers is essential for thorough design work. By examining the work of other designers, we are better able to identify our own interests and concerns, and avoid repeating mistakes that have been navigated in the past. This lecture-based class will present the history of Industrial Design in a way that links it to today's studio work, and offers connection points to link past innovation and design activity with future design success. The lectures present a chronological overview of the profession of Industrial Design and its antecedents. Topics discussed will include major design movements, significant designers, manufacturers, and design-related companies, innovations in technology and material use, the development of sales, marketing, and user-focused designing, and the history of design process. Coursework includes extensive reading, in-class presentations based on independent research, projects, and writing. .

    Major requirement; ID majors

    Liberal Arts elective credit for non-majors pending seat availability.

  12. ID Graduate Shop Orientation

    This course will acclimate new graduate students to the shop environment of the Industrial Design Department. The Metal, Wood and Model Shops are invaluable resources, clarifying pragmatic aspects of the design process from general feasibility of manufacturing to the challenges of translating concepts into tangible objects. This course covers excerpted information from both undergraduate courses Wood I and Metals I and emphasizes safety in the utilization of shop facilities.

    Graduate major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design department, course not available via web registration

  13. Intro To Shoemaking

    Shoes are an everyday commodity; but do you know how many are steps involved? In this course, students will handcraft a basic pair of cemented construction shoes from start to finish. This includes beginning by creating a basic pattern, draping the last, cutting (clicking) the leather, sewing (closing) the upper, building a stacked leather heel, and finishing the sole. We will approach the requirements of constructing a shoe through choice of material, characteristics of leather, and how to utilize them in laying out the pattern. In the process of the construction from pattern to shoe, we will work with basic tools for handcrafted shoemaking including a shoemaker's knife, closers hammer, buff stick, lasting pincers to name a few. Students are expected to complete one pair of shoes and begin work on a second pair, applying and expanding upon the techniques learned in the class.

    ID majors only

    Also offered as APPAR 2494 for Apparel majors

  14. Manufacturing Techniques

    This course introduces the students to methods, materials, and manufacturing processes that translate design activity into finished goods. A significant portion of downstream design activity is devoted to manufacturing issues - the techniques by which materials are selected, shaped, and then assembled. Students will be evaluated based upon success of weekly field study research assignments and a final exam.

    Major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design department, course not available via web registration

  15. Metal II

    The objective of this course is to develop a more precise, professional and sensitive approach to design while broadening the student's technical base. Precision machine tools such as metal lathes, millers and grinders will be introduced. Logical design and set-up approaches will be discussed. Outside design work will be required with emphasis on engineering drawing and sequence of operations. There will be a strong emphasis on experimenting with the material in order to promote innovative thinking and problem solving. Major elective; ID majors only

  16. Wkshp: Drawing

    In this class we practice a variety of digital and freehand methods of design exploration and visual communication used by designers. These sketching and rendering skills are ideal for anyone who has to understand and resolve form while communicating ideas within interdisciplinary environments. We will focus on the redesign of a few objects, starting with some sketching from the ideation phase through to a final solution that describes the aesthetic and emotive intents, as well as demonstrates knowledge of functional or unique manufacturing requirements. The class is built on the belief that strong two-dimensional skills remain the essential tool for product designers.

    Students attending the first module will be required to participate in the final critique on the final day of the semester.

    Open to junior and above.

  17. Wkshp: Product Photography

    This class will cover basic camera optics and lighting techniques necessary to generate high quality digital images for either print or digital portfolio applications. The focus of the class is to master manual controls on the digital camera such as film and shutter speed settings in conjunction with aperture openings to obtain whatever the desired effect might be to best represent two and three-dimensional objects. Manipulation of natural and artificial lighting is the other main focus of the class. Students will learn the use of fill and bounce cards with sun, tungsten and strobe light sources. The emphasis will be on the strobe lighting studio where through a series of assignments students will learn direct, diffused reflected lighting techniques.

    Students will be required to participate in the final critique during the final week of the semester.

    Open to junior and above.

  18. Wood II

    This course will deal with advanced woodworking processes, including milling and machinery use, laminate and steam bending, plywood and veneer. Techniques in using natural and synthetic materials connected with furniture will be covered.

    Major elective; ID majors only

Departments

Apparel Design Architecture Ceramics Digital + Media Experimental and Foundation Studies Film / Animation / Video Furniture Design Glass Graduate Studies Graphic Design History of Art + Visual Culture History, Philosophy + the Social Sciences Illustration Industrial Design Interior Architecture Jewelry + Metalsmithing Landscape Architecture Literary Arts + Studies Painting Photography Printmaking Sculpture Teaching + Learning in Art + Design Textiles