Industrial Design

Graduate

  • MID | 2-year program

    The Master of Industrial Design program explores design as a vehicle for addressing social, cultural, environmental and other concerns, recognizing that design is not simply a professional service, but rather a way of connecting individual interests and values with a social framework. The program endorses the notion that the most valuable design opportunities today are those promoting the preservation of our environment and a better understanding of human behavior.

  • Inspiring Community

    Many of the approximately 20 graduate students in the MID program come from backgrounds beyond ID, including architecture, engineering, fine arts, graphic design, anthropology, marketing and more. But they share an interest in critical thinking and making, along with the curiosity and drive to pursue graduate-level research and production. Graduate students work closely with an accomplished team of faculty members who specialize in various areas of professional practice and show unparalleled dedication to teaching, mentoring and engaging students in real-world problem solving.

  • Learning Environment

    MID candidates work in the department’s well equipped, six-floor building, sharing studio, shop and gallery spaces with approximately 210 undergraduate ID majors. Graduate students are expected to demonstrate a high level of independence, motivation and competence in developing the physical and ideological aspects of their work.

  • Andy Law | associate professor + graduate program director

    “Graduate candidates in ID don’t necessarily need an undergraduate degree in the field, but they do need strong visual communication skills. For those without an ID background, learning CAD, drawing and model making can be beneficial, and taking a general product design course can provide insight into the design process. Materials-based courses in a medium such as metal, glass, textiles, ceramics or wood also provide a good basis for work in ID.”

     

  • Curriculum

    Projects during the first year help enhance and expand individual industrial design methodologies, both through direct practice and discussions regarding case studies and product history. This helps to define personal value systems, working methodologies and the means of effectively engaging audiences in dialogue. The study of history and theory is also fundamental to the program and series of seminars on relevant contemporary issues encourages dialogue among students as they develop their own perspectives on design.

    2-year MID first year

    • Fall
    • Graduate ID studio I
    • Graduate ID seminar I
    • Graduate shop orientation
    • Open elective
    • Wintersession
    • Open elective
    • Spring
    • Graduate ID studio II
    • Graduate ID seminar II
     

    2-year MID second year

    • Fall
    • Graduate ID studio III
    • Elective seminar
    • Open elective
    • Wintersession
    • Open elective
    • Spring
    • Graduate ID thesis
    • Open elective
     

    2.5-year MID first year

    • Wintersession
    • Intro to Industrial Design
    • Spring
    • Advanced ID studio
    • ID studio elective
     

    2.5-year MID second year

    • Fall
    • Graduate ID studio I
    • Graduate ID seminar I
    • Graduate shop orientation
    • Open elective
    • Wintersession
    • Open elective
    • Spring
    • Graduate ID studio II
    • Graduate ID seminar II 
     

    2.5-year MID third year

    • Fall
    • Graduate ID studio III
    • Elective seminar
    • Open elective
    • Wintersession
    • Open elective
    • Spring
    • Graduate ID thesis
    • Open elective
     

  • Thesis Project

    Thesis topics cover a broad range of fields, from product and furniture explorations to design for aerospace and medical applications. Graduate students work independently under the guidance of a faculty advisor and thesis committee, and present their final work verbally, visually and in writing. They also participate in RISD’s Graduate Thesis Exhibition, a large-scale public show held in the Rhode Island Convention Center.

  • Application Requirements

    1. Application form + fee
    2. Academic transcripts
    3. Letters of recommendation (3)
    4. Portfolio of work
      • Your portfolio must be reproduced and may be submitted using Slideroom, an online portfolio submission service or as digital image files on a CD or DVD. Detailed instructions for using Slideroom are available on the site (risd.slideroom.com). Slideroom charges $10 for using this submission option.
      • If you choose to send your portfolio directly as digital files, each image should be submitted as a separate file in .jpg format. Individual file sizes should not exceed 3MB. Do not combine images in a prepared presentation or slideshow of any type (e.g., PowerPoint or Keynote). You should also include a printed thumbnail page of the images on your disk. Please do not affix any adhesive labels to your CD/DVD.
      • Time-based work or performance pieces may be submitted as QuickTime or.mpg files on a CD or DVD. You should include a work description sheet along with your CD. Number the examples you are submitting and on your description page list the corresponding number, medium, size, date of completion and title for each work. It is very important that your full name and address are clearly noted on your CD/DVD and your description and thumbnail pages.
      • CD/DVDs will not be returned.
       
    5. Statement of purpose
    6. TOEFL scores (for non-native English speakers)

    The faculty selection committee in Industrial Design looks for evidence of the ability and preparedness to undertake graduate-level work. Portfolios should be professionally presented using the highest quality representation of work showing the breadth and depth of your design and creative thinking capabilities.