Fall 2017

  1. Advanced Computing: Fundamentals Of Revit

    Building Information Modeling (BIM) is defined as a digital representation of physical and functional characteristics of a facility. Revit is one of the most comprehensive and widely used BIM programs in the world. The software closes the gap between 3D geometry and building component data. This course will introduce students to Revit utilizing a hands-on approach. The class will introduce the essential concepts of the software through weekly class lectures/ tutorials. Weekly assignments will allow students to use their knowledge to complete real-life design tasks. Hands-on exercises will also focus on software interface, creation of parametric families and creation of construction document sets.

    Participants must have laptop with Windows, w/Parallels recommended for Mac users. Free student download of Revit available.

    Major elective: BFA,MDes, MA

    INTAR majors only

  2. Advanced Design Studios

    Choice of advanced design studios offered by the Department of Interior Architecture. Details & studio descriptions are made available to pre-registered students.

    INTAR majors only.

    Registration by Interior Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

    Course-related Expenses: students who elect some advanced studios may incur expenses for course supplies or related travel. Anticipated costs will be announced during the lottery studio prsentations held in the department.

  3. Advanced Drawing & Computing Tectonics

    This course focuses on the drawing as it serves to convey different design intentions. As a continuation of the basic drawing coursework in the MDes Summer Program, this course will explore advanced techniques in digital representation.

    Students successfully completing this course will be able to understand the construction of 3D drawings, develop sophisticated digital layouts with image processing software, create CAD based 2D architectural drawings and 3D models, and develop a 3D visualization of a design. The integration of 2D and 3D data, digital materials, as well as the basics of digital lighting and camera work will also be discussed.

    Major Requirement: MDes

    INTAR majors only

  4. Applied Building Systems For Adaptive Reuse

    This course approaches the subject of adaptive reuse through environmental issues, economic analysis and design. These fundamental concepts are applied in real-world projects of reuse to reduce negative impacts to the built environment.

    Course objectives include an understanding of energy and environmental context, the ability to develop schematic designs for energy efficient interventions in an existing building, the ability to perform basic analyses of the energy and economic performance of building measures and to apply course material to case studies of completed buildings.

    Students should develop familiarity with energy and environmental impacts associated with the built environment and the rationale for responsible design, energy modeling and calculations, passive and active lighting systems (including daylighting techniques and fenestration) and the thermal performance of buildings including the thermal envelope and passive and active heating systems.

    The course structure includes a midterm examination, case studies, an individual research paper and a final design project.

    Major Requirement: MA

    INTAR majors only

  5. Building Materials Exploration

    This class introduces the student to different building materials, their properties and characteristics. Through a series of full scale construction projects and material making processes, the student will be asked to explore these materials and their potential in the design of interior structures.

    Major requirement: BFA

    INTAR majors only

    Registration by Interior Architecture department, course not available via web registration

  6. Building Structures And Systems For Adaptive Reuse

    While introducing students to the principal concepts of structural design and mechanical systems, the course will attempt to provide a direct link to the built environment with focus on the rehabilitation, preservation and adaptive reuse of existing structures, both historical and contemporary. The presentation of case studies, focus on the structural and mechanical aspects of students' individual studio projects and the excursion to at least one construction site will bridge the gap between class room and the world of building.

    Major requirement: BFA

    INTAR majors only

  7. Collaborative Study

    A Collaborative Study Project (CSP) allows two students to work collaboratively to complete a faculty supervised project of independent study.

    Usually, a CSP is supervised by two faculty members, but with approval it may be supervised by one faculty member. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses, though it is not a substitute for a course if that course is regularly offered.

  8. Design Thesis Prep

    This seminar is the first of the three-part Design Thesis sequence in the department of Interior Architecture. This course is designed to assist students in identifying a thesis topic and respective design project through discussions that include studies of precedents, site related issues, program, and regulations, all of which are specific to adaptive reuse. Through group discussion and individual interviews, outline proposals will be approved in principle, requiring each student to prepare a feasibility report for their proposed Design Thesis. This completed feasibility report will be submitted for evaluation at the end of the Fall semester. Approved proposals will proceed to the next course in the sequence, where the proposal will be further refined, culminating in the design phase that will take place during the following Spring semester.

    Major requirement: MDes

    INTAR majors only

    Registration by Interior Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  9. Drawing For Interior Architecture

    Introduction to means of representation of ideas for Interior Architecture through various types of drawings: orthographics, axonometrics, perspectives, freehand sketching and mixed media. Work will be done on site from existing structures as well as in the studio concentrating on concept development through drawing.

    Major requirement:BFA

    INTAR majors only

    Registration by Interior Architecture department, course not available via web registration

  10. History Of Adaptive Reuse

    This course will examine the major architectural personalities working in Europe (Italy, France, England, Spain, Germany, the Netherlands) and in North America in the period 1800 to 2010. Areas of study will include an examination of adaptive reuse related issues that will be studied in the context of their social, political, technological, and economic circumstances, as they pertain to the design culture of the period. Special emphasis will be given to interior renovations, additions, transformations and other interventions of adaptive reuse. Other areas of study will include the development of architectural drawing, and the way in which designs often evolved through committees, or ongoing consultations among patrons, designers, administrators, and scholars. Attention will also be given to design theory, and the doctrines relating to site, orientation, proportion, decorum, and the commercial design market.

    This course will be conducted in seminar form with discourse and discussions at the graduate level.

    Major Requirement: MDes

    INTAR majors only

  11. History Of Interior Architecture I: 1400-1850

    personalities working in Europe (Italy, France, England, Spain, Germany, the Netherlands) and in North America (the U.S.A., Canada and Mexico) in the period 1400 to 2009. Areas of study will include an examination of interior design related issues that will be studied in the context of their social, political, technological, and economic circumstances, as they pertain to the design culture of the period. Special emphasis will be given to interior additions and renovations and other interventions. Other areas of study will include the development of architectural drawing, and the way in which designs often evolved through committees, or ongoing consultations among patrons, designers, administrators, and scholars. Attention will also be given to design theory, and the doctrines relating to site, orientation, proportion, decorum, and the commercial design market.

    A general background in the history of Art and Design is desirable but not mandatory.

    Major Requirement for BFA

    INTAR majors only

    Art History credit for Interior Architecture majors only

    Liberal Arts elective credit for non-majors pending seat availability.

  12. Human Factors

    The psychology of the client/user influences the design of the environment and the practice of interior architecture. This course will explore issues of anthropometrics (the study of the characteristics of the human body), ergonomics (the application of anthropometric data to design), and proxemics (the study of the effect of cultural/psychological factors on design). During the semester the student will gather facts about the interaction of the environment and a user's culture, gender, stage of life cycle, and physical characteristics. These ideas will be implemented in the design and construction of an object.

    Major requirement: BFA

    INTAR majors only

    Registration by Interior Architecture department, course not available via web registration

  13. Human Factors: Ergonomics And Acoustics

    This course will focus on factors influencing the design of the interior environment through exploring issues of anthropometrics (the study of the characteristics of the human body), ergonomics (the application of anthropometric data to design), and proxemics (the study of the effect of cultural/psychological factors on design).

    It will be complemented by a study of acoustics as it relates to the relationship between the built environment and sound; predicting and designing for the acoustic performance of spaces, and executing acoustic measurements (impulse response, reverberations).

    Major Requirement: MDes

    INTAR majors only

  14. ISP Major

    The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses. Proposals for ISPs are due the semester prior, per the published deadlines in the Academic Calendar.

    Permission of instructor and GPA of 3.0 or higher is required.

    Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; the course is not available via web registration.

  15. ISP Non-major Elective

    The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses.

    Permission of instructor and GPA of 3.0 or higher is required.

    Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; the course is not available via web registration.

  16. Intro To Design Studio II

    This course builds on the foundations gained in previous studio and course work by specifically furthering design development abilities. The studio will require the integration of the student's emerging knowledge of site analysis, mapping & documentation, innovative tectonics and systems, applicable theoretical issues, relevant cultural precedents, and precise material investigation into a cohesive design agenda. Major Requirement: MDes

    INTAR majors only

  17. Intro To Interior Studies I

    This course, the first in a sequence, explores design principles through design problems involving the unique fundamental framework for the reuse of existing structures. The semester is arranged around several projects, providing access to the discipline from as many related perspectives. The project assignments require the student to visually and verbally convey clear design intent, think visually in two and three dimensions, formulate and develop abstract design concepts, discern relationships between design interventions and their physical and contextual setting and develop presentation skills to effectively communicate propositions and positions.

    Major requirement: BFA

    INTAR majors only.

    Registration by Interior Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  18. Intro To Interior Studies III

    Building on the skills and knowledge developed during the first year in the Department, undergraduate students will focus their attention on a project which requires the hypothetical remodeling of an existing building of some complexity for a proposed new use.

    Major requirement: BFA

    INTAR majors only

    Registration by Interior Architecture Department; course not available via web registration.

  19. Participatory Exhibitions

    Designing participatory exhibition spaces requires a deep understanding of time-based interactions between recipients and their immersive environments. In this seminar/workshop the participants will gain knowledge on the history of exhibiting, the first participatory approaches in galleries and museums. We will discuss the difference between participatory art and participatory exhibition design. Observations in the RISD Museum and other local galleries, as well as a field trip to Boston will give opportunities to experience various exhibition scenarios. To recognize various clientele, we will also visit places like the Providence Children's Museum. To understand communication processes, we will look at communication theory models and the interaction between artist, art piece, recipient, and exhibition space. As designers, we will have to find the gap in these relationships where undefined participatory process and exchange might happen. Different examples of current participatory exhibition practices will show us tools and ways to engage the audience in different ways. We will further explore the relevance of movement in space, through exercise from contact improvisation, performance art, and play. Finally, we will explore digital possibilities, as well as old-school analogue hands-on media and immerse into multi-sensory exhibition experiences.

    Major elective: MDes Interior Studies [Exhibition & Narrative Environments]

    Open to other Graduate students by Permission of Instructor/Department.

  20. Professional Internship

    The professional Internship provides valuable exposure to a professional setting, enabling students to better establish a career path and define practical aspirations. Internship proposals are carefully vetted to determine legitimacy and must meet the contact hour requirements listed in the RISD Course Announcement.

  21. Scheme Detailing

    This course explores the principles of construction and design detailing. The student will detail the construction of a previously designed studio project. Finish materials, window treatments, light fixtures, and furniture will be selected. Construction methods and materials will be examined as well as the performance and appearance retention of finishes. Individual presentations will be made on a variety of traditional and nontraditional materials.

    Major requirement: BFA

    INTAR majors only

    Registration by Interior Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  22. Structures & Materials For Adaptive Reuse

    This lecture course is designed to familiarize students with structural principles and systems as they relate to the study of interior architecture. The course will examine the performance and composition of various structural systems, including wood, lightweight metal, steel, masonry, and concrete structures. To gain an understanding of structures, their materials and components in adaptive reuse, we will visit local examples in the built environment.

    Major requirement: MDes

    INTAR majors only

    Registration by Interior Architecture department, course not available via web registration

  23. Theory Of Adaptive Reuse

    Routinely defined as "transforming an unused or underused building into one that serves a new use," the practice of adaptive reuse is rich and varied.

    This lecture course will examine the pluralism of this practice through weekly lectures that focus on these varying aspects. The course will also focus on the differences in the implementation of this practice from countries in Northern Europe with its longstanding regard for reuse to countries with emerging practices.

    The lectures will include case studies of buildings, unbuilt projects, and urban assemblages, which will be contextualized through the common themes which are critical to understanding reuse.

    Requirements: weekly lectures and discussions, readings, a mid-term examination and a final presentations.

    Major Requirement: MA, MDes

    INTAR majors only

    Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration.

  24. Virtual Spatial Mophologies

    "Spatial Computing is a set of ideas and technologies that will transform our lives by understanding the physical world, knowing and communicating our relation to places in that world, and navigating through those places. The transformational potential of Spatial Computing is evident."

    The key objective of this course is investigating and learning to apply technologies and design-related methods associated with Virtual Spatial Morphologies. For experimentation, the students will be offered a set of cutting edge hardware and software tools acquired by the department. This course prepares and contextualizes experiments the students perform with the tools, and intends to explore their potential applications and relevance in the architectural field.

    At present, traditional methods for spatial analysis and the communication of spatial ideas are undergoing a rapid transformation. Tape measures and survey sketches can now be replaced by 3D laser scanners, and algorithms will gradually replace manually performed tasks of processing and interpreting the surveyed data. Floor plans, sections and perspectives don't have to be drafted or modeled to specific demands any more, but are just part of the many ways we can look at a building information models. Proper knowledge of conventions, such as two parallel lines signifying walls under certain circumstances, or possessing a concept of scale to interpret a model cease to be hindrances when discussing architectural ideas with lay-people or a wider public.

    Spatial Computing drives this transformation. It offers opportunities for students to experiment with novel approaches to spatial analysis and design communication. Through a series of lectures, tutorials and experiments, this course intends to introduce our students to the necessary skills, allowing them not only to participate in that transformation, but also explore how to shape it, in practice and when devising new theories, e.g. about human interaction with virtuality in a spatial context.

    INTAR majors only. Course Level: senior and above

Wintersession 2018

  1. *Morocco: Crafting The City: Handicrafts In Context

    In this studio course RISD students will engage with the reciprocity between craftsmanship and the adaptation of the built environment in the context of artisan economies. The course will use Handicrafts in Morocco as a case study to explore the balance between preservation and innovation in geographical contexts where the making of artifacts and environments today may associate heritage, tradition, know-how, societal-contract, and creativity as forms of craftsmanship. Over the course of a 4-week period RISD students will be based in the World Heritage site of the city of Fez combining an immersive learning environment with periodic study tours in Morocco. RISD students will participate in a series of workshops in collaboration with Artisan Centers exploring how a combined millenary confluence of cultures and planned societal organizational systems are reflected over time both in the handicraft sector and the adaptation of the built environment in Fez.

    RISD students will participate in a multi-lateral exchange of ideas and perspectives. Using the direct collaboration with the Liberal Arts course; the resources and know-how of Moroccan Artisans Centers; and visits, lectures and interviews in Morocco to observe and directly experience craftsmanship in context as a process to engage with specific challenges that artisans' economies face in today's global economy. During the course students will study craft in reference to the adaptation of the built environment simultaneously as a form of heritage and socio-economic development: where past and present technical, cultural and social protocols associated with handicrafts are on the one hand a vital form of preservation and transfer of know how; while on the other hand a driving factor for employment of youth and the functioning of the local and export markets.

    RISD students will be exposed to an immersive learning experience in Morocco as an opportunity to speculate to what extent existing and emerging compositional principles observed and experienced on site may generate systems for representing nature and order in reference to local and global contextual changes. The studio will use the millenary labyrinth and mosaic nature of the narrow streets of the Medina of Fez to analyze the notion of the interiority in the way building tradition and community coexists in a place listed as a UNESCO world heritage site. Over the course of their study in Fez students will observe and survey existing buildings in a neighborhood in the urban fabric assessing how the combination of mixed-used program activities and services related to artisan's economy might become a catalyst for development and local residents.

    The studio will be collaborating with the Ministry of Handicrafts to identify a site in one neighborhood in the Medina where students' may transfer their direct observations in the field in dialogue with the faculty and team of experts to particular projects; or in developing a collective project addressing specific programmatic strategies for adapting the space to a possible cultural, educational, commercial or residential program. Throughout the survey and exploration process on site students will explore a broad of range of compositional and adaptation principles in direct dialogue with the context of study.

    The field project is the culmination of students learning experience in Morocco. The project is based on the design of a space in the Medina of Fez that collects samples of the experiments created during the workshops in the Artisans' centers in context as well as the methods in which students responded to the broad open question in how a site in the Medina might become a catalyst for development and local residents. Students will use the selected site to map, propose and model series of micro interventions at the scale of inserts, additions to the built environment that may evoke new possibilities to increase the spatial performance of the existing site and its programmatic demands. The final project offers the opportunity for students to analyze compositional principles in reference to how materials come together and the underlying logic inherent to the application or development of craft in context. The programming offers students to design an interface between private and public environments exploring the notion of interiority in urban space in the Morocco social and cultural contexts. Students are expected to document and transport their work to campus for final presentation.

    This is a co-requisite course. Students must also plan and register for HAVC-1511. Students will receive 3 studio credits and 3 liberal arts credits.

    All students are required to remain in good academic standing in order to participate in the WS travel course/studio. Failure to remain in good academic standing can lead to removal from the course, either before or during the course. Also in cases where WS travel courses and studios do not reach student capacity, the course may be cancelled after the last day of Wintersession travel course registration. As such, all students are advised not to purchase flights for participation in Wintersession travel courses until the course is confirmed to run, which happens within the week after the final Wintersession travel course registration period.

    Registration begins in October at a time to be announced.

    Permission of Instructor required.

    Open to sophmore and above; course is not open to to first year students.

    2018WS Estimated Travel Cost: TBA ***Off-Campus Study***

  2. Does This Make Sense?

    Sensory perception defines how we experience the built. How do we as designers move beyond the ocularcentric design methods that dominate contemporary practice and reactivate the entire body as a receptor of space? Through hand building, drawing, and writing, this course will explore the haptic connection between making and sensory observation. We will investigate within and beyond the five senses and begin to interpret pressure, balance, rhythm, movement, warmth, and more as tools for embodying space.

    Estimated Material Cost $100

  3. Intro To Interior Architecture For Non-majors

    This course is primarily intended to provide some insight into the design objectives of the studio projects of the undergraduate and graduate degree programs of Interior Architecture at RISD. As a studio introduction to Interior Architecture for non-majors, the course will focus on the spatial design concerns of the department focusing on how one carves, creates and occupies built space. Projects will explore the realm of work that begins with an architectural volume and transforms it from the ill-used or obsolete, to new purpose and viability, presented in drawings and models.

  4. Portfolio Prep & Production

    This class is primarily intended as a means for students in their year of graduation from the Department to prepare their portfolios for interviews with potential employers and for entry to the professional world of design. Using computer programs which will build upon knowledge already gained, the course will be helpful to all those who wish to gain some knowledge of techniques which will enhance the presentation of design work already completed. This is an essential aspect of the class, and should not be regarded as an opportunity to extend further design work on earlier studios, although some refinement of existing drawings will be necessary. InDesign, Illustrator & Photoshop software required.

    Graduating Interior Architecture majors only

  5. Set Design Studio

    The class seeks to examine set design within a studio environment that is as close as possible to that of the profession, allowing students the opportunity to work on numerous productions in the design roles within theatre and opera. Relevance will be attached to the exploration of visual solutions that are viscerally grounded in the text. Script analysis will be thorough and ongoing. Group participation in this process is essential. Students will be expected to read and research one to two plays per week. All sets will be modeled, with fluctuating levels of completion.

    Architecture & Design Majors Only

  6. Theory Wkshp: Investigating Interiority

    This seminar is intended as a reinforcement of and preparation for the self-choice Design Thesis taking place the following Spring. The seminar will assist the student in becoming more aware of factors which determine a successful outcome for a design intervention within an existing building.

    As the second part of the three-part thesis sequence, the course builds upon INTAR 2397 and the student's approved Design Thesis Feasibility Report.

    Major requirement: MDes

    INTAR majors only.

    Registration by Interior Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  7. Typography In 3d Space

    The use of typography in the 3D space is a compelling one. With both a strong formal dimension and an informational function, typography will provide a coherent program with a real sense of order. If it is applied with a comprehensive system, this sense of unity allows for better communication. The typography display in the space is built with different parts related to one another by a system. In order to understand the nature of a very well organized typographic program, our point of view must be fundamentally structural. Such an approach allows us to discern the sophisticated underlying relationship between parts which creates a sense of wholeness.

    This Cross-disciplinary course will offer the students of Interior Architecture and Graphic Design the opportunity of working with typography in 3 Dimensional Space.

    Students will apply the use of proportion, hierarchy, and legibility in two aspects of the 3D space: A Wayfinding project and a Museum Exhibition.

    The course will explore the methodology required to work with typographic systems in the 3 Dimensional environment, applying the narrative aspect of information. Specific attention will be devoted to exploring the methodology of designing in different scales and the ability to translate 2 dimensional content to a 3 Dimensional display. Studies will include setting text in small and big scales, the use of grids, and the application of a comprehensive system.

    This course will be concerned with the process which controls the structure and properties of applying big scale typography and further students understanding of how applying information typographically can challenge a space.

    Through formal, geometric, and spatial analytic processes, students will build systems with two considerations: The interdisciplinary planning and design process between an Architect and a Graphic Designer as well as the application of a Sign System within the Adaptive Reuse project.

    Major elective: BFA, MDes, MA

    Restricted to senior and graduate students only.

    INTAR and GRAPH majors only; non-majors by permission of Instructor.

    Also offered as GRAPH-3198; Register in the course for which credit is desired.

Spring 2018

  1. Adaptive Reuse Design Studio

    As the final studio in the year-long sequence of studios and seminars focusing on the practice of adaptive reuse, the student will have the opportunity to demonstrate these principles and theories in a complex design project of reuse.

    With a local city as the setting for the project, students have access to the site and are able to observe and experience firsthand the constraints of an existing structure. Students will also have the opportunity to use city resources such as a city's Department of Planning and Development, Historic District Commission, RI State Council on the Arts, etc. This project will serve as a model for engaging other real-world adaptive reuse applications.

    This studio will be taught in conjunction with the 3-credit Adaptive Reuse Seminar: INTAR-2363.

    Major Requirement: MA

    INTAR majors only

    Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration.

  2. Advanced Design Studios

    Choice of advanced design studios offered by the Department of Interior Architecture. Details & studio descriptions are made available to pre-registered students.

    INTAR majors only.

    Registration by Interior Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

    Course-related Expenses: students who elect some advanced studios may incur expenses for course supplies or related travel. Anticipated costs will be announced during the lottery studio prsentations held in the department.

  3. Codes And Details

    This class introduces the student to an overview of codes and it's implementation through construction details as related to the study of adaptive reuse. It will provide in depth focus on pertinent parts of local and national building codes that address issues affecting interior architecture such as egress, materials, planning, and accessibility. The student will be asked through quizzes as well as short design projects to implement these rules and regulations and to demonstrate a familiarity with the codes.

    Major requirement:MDes

    INTAR majors only.

    Registration by Interior Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  4. Design Thesis

    Required for students in the MDes degree program. Under the supervision of their thesis advisor, students are responsible for the preparation and completion of a fully articulated design proposal of their own choice, as described by their "Design Thesis Feasibility Report", submitted at the end of the Fall semester's Design Thesis Preparation class.

    Major requirement: MDes

    INTAR majors only.

    Registration by Interior Architecture Department; course not available via web registration.

  5. Energy And Systems

    This course provides students with an opportunity to study how distinct building systems are constructed to form a comprehensive whole. Through case studies, students will examine approaches to integrating a variety of systems, such as structural, electrical, mechanical, plumbing, acoustic, and communication systems. This course will focus on how interior architecture interfaces with existing buildings; the case studies will be of recent works that have altered existing building. Students will be required to use the shop and computers to execute their individual and group assignments.

    Major requirement: MDes

    Elective for undergraduate students; INTAR majors only.

    Registration by Interior Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  6. Final Studio Project Seminar

    Building on the final advanced studio in the undergraduate program, the seminar engages the graduating senior with research and design studies that expand the focus of the final studio. This will involve expanded reading, group discussions, testing of typology studies, further conceptual development and a writing component. The course will culminate in a group project: the design and installation of the Senior Show as a demonstration of a design intervention within an existing structure.

    Major requirement; INTAR senior majors only.

    Permission of instructor required. Course not available via web registration.

  7. Grad Adaptive Reuse Seminar

    This seminar will be taught in conjunction with a 6 credit Adaptive Reuse Studio, (INTAR 2362) in which the students explore design innovation and its relationship to the constraints of an existing site. The student will select a topic of research in conjunction with their design project, formulate propositions and develop them with a team of advisers.

    Evidence of such research will culminate in both written form and as part of the design proposal.

    Major Requirement: MA

    INTAR majors only

    Permission of instructor required. Course not available via web registration.

  8. History Of Interior Architecture II: 1850 To Present

    This course will examine the major designers working in the period 1850 to the present. Areas of study will include an examination of design related issues that will be studied in the context of their social, political, technological, and economic circumstances, as they pertain to the design culture of the period. Special emphasis will be given to the history of interior interventions, additions and renovations.

    Other areas of study will include the development of architectural drawing and other presentation media, and the way in which designs often evolved through committees, or ongoing consultations among the patrons, designers, administrators, and scholars. Attention will also be given to design theory, and the doctrines relating to site, orientation, proportion, decorum, and the commercial design market.

    A general background in the history of Art and Design is desirable but is not mandatory.

    Major requirement: BFA

    INTAR majors only.

    Liberal Arts elective credit.

    Permission of Instructor required.

  9. Intro To Computing For Interior Architecture

    The objective of this class is to learn basic digital techniques in spatial design. Students successfully completing this course should be able to develop sophisticated digital layouts with image processing software, create CAD based 2D architectural drawings and 3D models, and develop a 3D visualization of a design. In this course, we will also discuss the integration of 2D and 3D data, digital materials, as well as the basics of digital lighting and camera work.

    Major requirement: BFA

    INTAR majors only.

    Registration by Interior Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  10. Intro To Interior Studies II

    This course further develops design principles from the first semester and introduces students to methodological thinking in the relationship between context, scale and use. Real site situations are introduced and students develop individual design processes associating topological relationships between the interior and exterior, at multiple scales of interventions. Students will have the opportunity to explore design issues through both traditional and computer generated design.

    Major requirement: BFA

    INTAR majors only.

    Registration by Interior Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  11. Principles Of Adaptive Reuse

    This course approaches the subject of adaptive reuse through the understanding of the rules and methods of design interventions. Analysis and synthesis regarding construction methods, structure, use, scale and the regulations pertaining to existing structures will be explored.

    Building on the framework of the International Building Code for Existing Structures, this course also examines the feasibility of reuse as defined by construction regulations and practice.

    The semester will be based upon case studies of completed projects in adaptive reuse to demonstrate the principles of design and construction within the context of existing structures. Through this course, students develop an understanding for the design process necessary in implementation of adaptive reuse in the design profession.

    Assigned papers and projects through the semester require the understanding and implementation of these methods and regulations on projects of adaptive reuse.

    Major Requirement: MA

    INTAR majors only.

    Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration.

  12. Spatial Perception: Light & Color

    This course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles of color and light as it applies to spatial and visual perceptions in the built environment. It is an opportunity to study color theory in conjunction with light, lighting systems and the effect of light on color.

    INTAR majors only.

    Registration by Interior Architecture Department; course not available via web registration.

  13. Theory Of Adaptive Reuse

    Routinely defined as "transforming an unused or underused building into one that serves a new use," the practice of adaptive reuse is rich and varied.

    This lecture course will examine the pluralism of this practice through weekly lectures that focus on these varying aspects. The course will also focus on the differences in the implementation of this practice from countries in Northern Europe with its longstanding regard for reuse to countries with emerging practices.

    The lectures will include case studies of buildings, unbuilt projects, and urban assemblages, which will be contextualized through the common themes which are critical to understanding reuse.

    Requirements: weekly lectures and discussions, readings, a mid-term examination and a final presentations.

    Major Requirement: MA, MDes

    INTAR majors only

    Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration.

  14. Theory Wkshp: Investigating Interiority

    This seminar is intended as a reinforcement of and preparation for the self-choice Design Thesis taking place the following Spring. The seminar will assist the student in becoming more aware of factors which determine a successful outcome for a design intervention within an existing building.

    As the second part of the three-part thesis sequence, the course builds upon INTAR 2397 and the student's approved Design Thesis Feasibility Report.

    Major requirement: MDes

    INTAR majors only.

    Registration by Interior Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  15. Wkshp: Advanced Computing: Digital Fabrication

    These 4 week workshops will engage desktop making tools to foster familiarity with digital fabrication in the design of the Interior environment. The student will explore the generation of new tectonic forms through abstract geometrical principles. Components of interior architecture will be modeled and fabricated with rapid prototyping and CNC machines. Topics will vary from semester to semester.

    (LAB 06 Digital Fabrication equipment: Laser Cutter, CNC Routing and 3D printing / Rhino 5.0 V. Windows + Grasshopper plug-in, VCarve)

    Major elective: BFA, MDes, MA INTAR majors only

Departments

Apparel Design Architecture Ceramics Digital + Media Experimental and Foundation Studies Film / Animation / Video Furniture Design Glass Graduate Studies Graphic Design History of Art + Visual Culture History, Philosophy + the Social Sciences Illustration Industrial Design Interior Architecture Jewelry + Metalsmithing Landscape Architecture Literary Arts + Studies Painting Photography Printmaking Sculpture Teaching + Learning in Art + Design Textiles