Fall 2017

  1. Brown Univ. Prof Elective

  2. Collaborative Study

    A Collaborative Study Project (CSP) allows two students to work collaboratively to complete a faculty supervised project of indepedndent study.

    Usually, a CSP is supervised by two faculty members, but with approval it may be supervised by one faculty member. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses, though it is not a substitute for a course if that course is regularly offered.

  3. Color Studio

    This studio-based course will provide the foundation necessary to understand basic color theory and practice in painting, art, and design. An historical and cultural perspective will be introduced to inform ongoing color studies executed in the studio. Students will acquire the vocabulary to articulate color phenomena and the means to exploit the expressive potential of color in their work. Color studies will be principally created with gouache, and a variety of other materials and means will also be explored. Lectures, demonstrations, and museum visits will supplement studio work. A short research paper is required.

    Elective; open to all majors.

  4. Digital Tools For Artists

    This is a hands-on, project-based introduction to computers and digital multimedia for artists. The course is designed to be an ongoing discussion on art, design and personal work informed by digital images, sound, video, animation, interactive multimedia, and the Internet.

    Major elective; Painting majors only.

  5. Drawing I

    An introductory level course for Painting majors. Students will develop drawing skills and insights and consider basic visual language issues. Syllabus is coordinated with Painting I.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  6. Drawing II

    A continued examination and development of drawing skills. This course is coordinated with Painting II.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  7. EHP Fall: Studio Concentratio

    In this intensive independent studio students continue and complete the work began in "EHP Studio Elective", culminating in the final exhibition and review. It corresponds to the remaining four weeks of the program, after students have finished with their Art History and Italian classes.

    Note: EHP credits replace the on-campus major requirements for the term students attend. Distribution to non-major requirements occurs when major credits are not needed.

  8. EHP Studio Elective

    Independent studio is at the core of the EHP experience. Upon arrival, students are assigned studio space at the Palazzetto Cenci, home of RISD's program in Rome. With guidance from the chief critic, each student develops a personal body of work sparked by his/her interactions with places, people and circumstances in Rome and other locations that are part of the EHP tours (such as the Northern, Southern or Eastern tours, as well as other shorter trips.) The work takes as a point of departure knowledge and techniques specific to individual home departments, but allows, and even encourages, explorations beyond disciplinary boundaries, including collaborations and cross-fertilization within a group of students from different departments working together.

    Beyond consistent and thorough engagement with studio work, requirements include participation in open studios and exhibitions, presentations in reviews, and attendance to all group activities and events, such as lectures at the Cenci and other institutions. From time to time, the chief critic may issue short assignments to introduce or focus on a particular subject. As part of the studio elective, students may be encouraged to keep sketchbooks and/or diaries, participate in optional activities--such as figure drawing sessions--and search for brief internships, apprenticeships, or other forms of interactions with local artists, designers, curators and critics.

    EHP Studio Elective corresponds to the first twelve weeks of the program, while students are also taking Art History and Italian classes. This course establishes the direction for the work in the "Studio Concentration" course that follows.

    Note: EHP credits replace the on-campus major requirements for the term students attend. Distribution to non-major requirements occurs when major credits are not needed.

  9. Experiments In Drawing

    This course examines the definition of drawing in the twentieth century. The student, while working from the basis of their own thematic and formal agenda, is directed to explore contemporary approaches to drawing. Through assignments and weekly group critiques, they will seek to broaden the conceptual basis for their work.

    Majors take this class or PAINT-4521 or PAINT-4597.

    Major elective, Painting majors only

  10. Fundamentals: Painting Methods And Materials

    This course will provide the foundation for the creation of an archival painting practice for both traditional and contemporary painting methods. Topics covered will include tools, preparation process for both canvas and wood panels, sizes and grounds, drying oils, varnishes and resins, pigments, solvents, painting procedures, and the care of finished paintings. A historical overview of traditional methods and materials including egg tempra and oil paint will be covered, in addition to modern alkyd resins and acrylics. RISD's Environmental Health & Safety practices that pertain to painting practice and painting studio safety will be an integral part of this course. A short research paper is required to supplement studio work.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  11. Graduate Drawing

    This course presents the graduate student with a series of problems intended to develop drawing as a tool for inquiry into a terrain outside the well-known beaten paths of his/her past studio practice. Expanding the role for drawing in studio experimentation is a goal. Work will be done outside class. There are critiques each week. Graduate major requirement

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  12. Graduate Paint Studio Critique I

    This period is designed for the students to evaluate and analyze the directions he/she established as an undergraduate. Criticisms of the student's work will be aimed at identifying strengths and weaknesses and help the students clarify fundamental objectives. Group and individual critiques will occur by resident faculty and visiting artists and critics during the semester. Successful completion of this course is a prerequisite for continuance in the program.

    Graduate major requirement

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  13. Graduate Paint Studio Critique III

    This period is designed as an advanced critique course which involves visits by resident faculty, visiting artists and critics, with special reference to current issues and concerns in contemporary art.

    Graduate major requirement

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  14. ISP Major

    The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses.

    Permission of instructor and GPA of 3.0 or higher is required.

    Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; the course is not available via web registration.

  15. Paint: Outgoing Exchange Pgm

    This course registers an outgoing exchange student into a pre-approved PAINT studio course which is taken at the exchange school. Successful completion of the course will result in a "T" grade once receipt of the official transcript from the partner school has arrived at Registrar's Office.

  16. Painterly Prints

    This course offers a more painterly approach to the intaglio process. The students will produce applications of intaglio, such as collographs, large color monotypes and collage. Growth of imagery and technique will be encouraged through medium. A portfolio of prints will be produced.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Permission of Instructor required.

  17. Painting From Observation

    This course is a comprehensive introduction to painting. It will be designed to develop confidence and experience with paint and painting. We will examine historical and contemporary trends and paint from life models and photo sources. Fundamental techniques for basic ground preparation, oil painting mediums and direct as well as indirect processes will be taught. Representational painting will be the primary focus but experiences in abstract painting will also be encouraged. We will learn abstract principles that organize composition, depict spatial illusion and describe form while developing a shared language for critiques. No prior painting experience is required.

  18. Painting I

    An introduction to the basic language of the painting discipline. Emphasis on the plastic and formal considerations necessary for work that willbecome an increasingly personal statement.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  19. Painting III

    The primary goal of this course will be to shift the responsibility of direction, problem-solving and problem- development from the Faculty Instructor to the student. But this will be accomplished with a great deal of faculty involvement and support. The class will begin with group assignments which will become increasingly independent. Group and individual critiques will continue as an integral part of the curriculum, with an emphasis on contemporary art and criticism.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  20. Painting Workshop

    This is an intensive program designed to test the student's ability to design, organize, and complete a project of his or her choosing.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  21. Professional Internship

    The professional Internship provides valuable exposure to a professional setting, enabling students to better establish a career path and define practical aspirations. Internship proposals are carefully vetted to determine legitimacy and must meet the contact hour requirements listed in the RISD Course Announcement.

  22. Professional Practices In Painting

    This course would address many practical issues to do with becoming a professional artist after graduation. Some of these issues are: the commercial gallery, the not-for-profit gallery, museums, graduate programs, auction houses, grants, documentation of work, archival storage of work and restoration of artwork. Professionals from the gallery, museum and other fields will be invited to the class to share their expertise with the student. Artists will be invited to talk about their professional experiences. It is a seminar class addressed particularly to the senior painting student.

    Major elective; Painting majors only

    Non-majors by permission of instructor

  23. Senior Honors Interdisciplinary Critique

    This is a course in which first-semester seniors who have already demonstrated unusual commitment, ambition and initiative within their majors will pursue and discuss independent work in a setting that reflects, as closely as possible, the interdisciplinary conversation that actually takes place around advanced art practice today. The course is intended to allow those working within medium-specific vocabularies to test how their work will make meaning in an art world in which a variety of disciplinary histories and conventions coexist, clash, and inform one another, as well as to provide an opportunity for students whose work bridges two or more disciplines (or involves performance/new genres/post-studio approaches) to learn from one another and from faculty capable of addressing all of these sorts of practices. This is a demanding critique course with additional seminar components (readings, screenings, discussions, slide presentations, etc.), and as such students can expect a workload equivalent to a core studio requirement within their major.

    Acceptance into the course will be based on a GPA of 3.25 or greater as well as the recommendation of faculty and department heads from the student's major and on review of previous work. Candidates will be identified in discussions between the instructor and department heads during the preceding spring semester. Successful completion of ARTH-H490/PAINT-4507 (Contemporary Art & its Discourses) or equivalent coursework is a prerequisite, ensuring students have a shared understanding of the art historical context for interdisciplinary. The maximum enrollment is limited to seminar-size (c. 15 students) in order to provide sufficient attention to each student's work in group and individual critiques while still allowing for seminar-style discussions Instructor permission required.

  24. Three Critics

    "Three Critics" will offer graduate students the opportunity to get inside the art critic's head and learn how writers think about the visual. Students will be exposed to a wide range of viewpoints and discourse on contemporary art issues as defined by the interests of three different, practicing critics. Each critic will become part of the RISD community for approximately one month, conducting 3 sessions on campus and one in New York or Boston. On-campus meetings will consist of lectures, reading and writing assignments, group critiques and one-on-one studio visits. Off-campus trips will include visits to museums, galleries and artist studios. Small groups of students will be expected to lead several classes. Outside coursework and full participation in class discussion required for successful completion.

    Graduate major requirement; second-year graduate Painting students.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

    Five additional seats available for Fine Arts graduate students. For admission, students submit a one-page writing sample to the Painting Graduate Program Director.

Wintersession 2018

  1. Bringing Painting Into Perspective

    The story of perspective has historically been taught as a trajectory that reached its pinnacle with the Renaissance "invention" of linear perspective. Issues of perspective, beyond the realm of train tracks and grids, have conceptual, practical, and socio-political ramifications for art today. This course, rooted in painting and drawing, but open to explorations of other media, reexamines the narrative of perspective and brings it up to our current moment. It seeks to broaden the meaning of perspective beyond its traditional artistic definition as a method of mapping 3D to 2D, to include its colloquial usage as point of view. This expansion and investigation will be supported by an introduction to perspectival modes from non-Western painting traditions and disciplines exterior to painting, as well as a consideration of the perspective, or point of view, of the maker and viewers of a painting. Through a series of hands-on studio-based projects, students will develop an understanding of the possibilities open to them as they progress towards creating works that advance and reflect their own unique perspectives, in all senses of the word. Through presentations and in-class exercises, this course will aid students in developing a firm foundation in the principles behind mapping a three-dimensional world onto a two-dimensional plane. We will explore the limitations of any one system of projection, and investigate alternatives to linear perspective. Students will consider the function, benefits, and ideological implications of these perspectival modes, and will be introduced to contemporary artists who are influenced by them. Students will also have the opportunity to investigate a system of perspective that is relevant to advancing their own area of interest. Students will then turn to the concept of point of view, and create pieces that investigate how a work can successfully take into account the perspective of the creator and/or viewers, looking to literature, film, and contemporary painting as guides. The class will culminate in a studio project that reflects the unique system of perspective that each student has been developing. Students of all disciplines and perspectives are welcomed.

    Estimated Material Cost $75.00

  2. Collaborative Study

    A Collaborative Study Project (CSP) allows two students to work collaboratively to complete a faculty supervised project of independent study.

    Usually, a CSP is supervised by two faculty members, but with approval it may be supervised by one faculty member. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses, though it is not a substitute for a course if that course is regularly offered.

  3. Color: A Workshop For Artists And Designers

    This course is based on Hornung's textbook, Colour: a workshop for artists and designers. Under the guidance of the instructor, students produce a series of small painted collages that examine color from a variety of approaches. The goal is to master color principles and make them applicable to studio practice.

    Estimated Material Cost $110.00

  4. Foreground/background: Interplay Between Surface And Imagery

    While the majority of drawing takes place on mass-produced, white paper, the surface on which a drawing is created is an important aspect of a drawing's composition and meaning. Color, texture, and materials of both surface and imagery all contribute to the final image. This course will focus on creating paper grounds as an integral part of the final composition. These grounds may even come to the forefront, evolving into distinct pieces that exist on their own.

    This class will be split into two phases: The first half of the class will be dedicated to the creation of paper grounds. Students will explore the process of making paper from start to finish. In the creation of sheets, students will learn coloring, painting, and pouring with pulp. Each sheet will become a unique composition, an original background or foreground. During the second half of the class, students will explore making drawings on their individual grounds. The relationship between imagery and surface will be consciously explored in order to develop multiple layers of meaning.

  5. ISP Major

    The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses.

    Permission of instructor and GPA of 3.0 or higher is required.

    Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; the course is not available via web registration.

  6. ISP Non-major Elective

    The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses.

    Permission of instructor and GPA of 3.0 or higher is required.

    Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; the course is not available via web registration.

  7. Liar, Liar: The Truth About Realism

    A realist painting purports to tell the truth. This is a lie. Realism never tells the truth, but instead shows a truth. In this class, we will consider how realist modes of making in a range of mediums are both derived from and reflective of deeply personal ways of seeing. Each week, we will consider a different way to source imagery-from observation, maquettes, and photographs-and investigate ways to work from these references. Our goal will be for each student to develop a realist lens that is uniquely her own by exploring the relationships between our formal choices and conceptual frameworks.

    To contextualize our work, we will examine the emergence of Realism in the nineteenth century; survey different realist movements from art history, including naturalism and social realism; and analyze how, over time, painters have adopted realist conventions to their own ends. We will draw particular focus to contemporary painters-such as Ellen Altfest, Eric Fischl, Josephine Halvorson, Catherine Murphy, and Lisa Yuskavage-who have established realism's relevance today. Through in-class demonstrations and exercises, we will explore how color mixing and paint handling in oils can inform our individual practices and expand the ways in which we see. While the tradition of painting will set the backdrop for this class, when it comes to take-home assignments, students will be encouraged to work in whatever mediums best reveal the truths they want to tell.

    <1>Estimated Material Cost $100.00

  8. Mining "Home"

    Upon meeting someone new, among the first things we ask are "where are you from; where do you call home"? We ask because we feel the answer will tell us something important about this [/a] person's identity. Whether it is your parents' house halfway around the world, the third doublewide in the trailer park or the classroom from your after-school program, the word "home" can represent a lot to different people. The objective of this hands-on class will be to explore the concept of place or home in five weekly assignments using various mediums in an interdisciplinary studio environment. Students from diverse backgrounds and locations will bring their own skillsets to the class to investigate the idea of "home" through writing, model-making, collage, painting (using water-based media) and video work. We will read selected excerpts from various authors who vividly evoke the concept of home in their writing. We will also study painting, photography and film that depict a strong sense of place, home and identity. The strategies of focused reflection and research on a specific topic ("home") learned in this class can be a powerful skill to utilize in future art making. PowerPoint presentations and demonstrations (like color mixing with gouache and editing in Adobe Premiere) will be provided.

    Estimated Material Cost $125.00

  9. Monster

    This course will investigate cultural traditions of the "monster", broadly defined as an entity of horrific other-ness. Monsters can be microscopic or gigantic, savage or pathetic, infectious or predacious. Monsters of all sorts, real and imagined, continue to invade our lives. Their narrative depiction has developed culturally as a metaphorical exploration of our deepest fears. tDuring the class our interest will be in a three dimensional communication and transcription of monster related imagery. While working with a variety of sculptural materials we will stimulate imagination through films, slides, books and articles. We will distill these influences into our own themes, grandiose, frightening and seductive. Our goal will be to forge connections between themes of fear from the distant, and those of our present lives.

  10. Painting From Observation Marathon

    Painting from Observation will be a team taught Schedule A and B marathon for 6 credits. Drawing, collage, printmaking and painting will introduce students to contemporary painting as practised by the RISD Painting Department.

    This course is a comprehensive introduction to painting. It is designed to develop confidence and experience with paint and painting. We will examine historical and contemporary trends and paint from life models and photo sources. Fundamental techniques for basic ground preparation, oil painting mediums and direct as well as in direct processes will be taught. Representational painting will be the primary focus but experiences in abstract painting will also be encouraged. We will learn abstract principles that organize composition, depict spatial illusion and describe form while developing a shared language for critiques. No prior painting experience is required.

  11. Primary Sources Illuminating The Ocean Deep At The New Bedford Whaling Museum

    "For there is no folly of the beast of the earth which is not infinitely outdone by the madness of men." - Herman Melville, Moby Dick

    Located just 35 minutes east of RISD, the New Bedford Whaling Museum offers a fascinating and often disturbing perspective on the emergence of modernity along side the systematic hunting and harvesting of whales to the brink of extinction. Through several visits to the museum this course asks students to reflect upon and interpret a wide range of interrelated subjects including folk art, nautical culture, colonial politics, marine biology and museum display. With additional access to museum archives students address these topics through research-based projects that employ drawing, painting, and installation with particular attention to contextualizing within differing modes of museum display.

    The New Bedford Whaling museum boasts a rich collection of unique and unusual artifacts that together issue a cautionary tale by asking visitors to contemplate the tenuous line between pursuit of profit and the destruction of that which we hold most sacred.

  12. Professional Internship

    The professional Internship provides valuable exposure to a professional setting, enabling students to better establish a career path and define practical aspirations. Internship proposals are carefully vetted to determine legitimacy and must meet the contact hour requirements listed in the RISD Course Announcement.

  13. Wanderers In A Sea Of Smot

    In 1818, the German Romantic artist Caspar David Friedrich painted Wander Above a Sea of Fog, in which a young man stands atop a rocky escarpment, surveying an untamed landscape of forest and craggy mountains. The wanderer's stance suggests dominion over the landscape, but also the insignificance of the individual within it. Friedrich believed the artist must match natural observation with introspective scrutiny, rejected overreaching portrayals of nature in its "totality," and presaged our 21st century understanding that human emotion and action are indivisible from the uncontrollable forces of nature. As humanity seems to be heading for catastrophe, nature's power has gained a renewed presence. With the restructuring of the environment has come a new cohabitation that forces us to reconsider our place within the natural order and revisit the interdependence with nature that our ancestors experienced. This studio asks students to create work that deals with their own connection to wilderness and nature. While students may not have advanced familiarity with collage, drawing, mixed media, or even painting in general, this class will utilize these mediums and also serve as a platform to create work that moves beyond specific media and into conceptual creation. Time spent sketching and documenting outside (brief walking and sketching trips to places such as Blackstone Park, as well as suggested individual trips to nearby nature parks) will complement in-class explorations and personal image-banking. Individual progress will be valued above technical expertise with any one medium. Sources from all areas of the arts and sciences will be examined and discussed, including writers (Rousseau, Thoreau, Louise Erdrich, Robert Smithson, Annie Dillard, Michael Pollan) and artists (Frederick Erwin Church, Pierre Huyghe, Ana Mendieta, Andy Goldsworthy, Letha Wilson, Agnes Denes, Mark Dion).

    Estimated Material Cost $100.00

Spring 2018

  1. Case Studies:contemporary Art

    This intensive course is designed to immerse students in select, salient debates impacting the direction and parameters of contemporary painting. The goal is not only to introduce and familiarize, but also to collectively and actively generate possibilities for and within the medium. Six overlapping nodes, or case studies, each accompanied by readings and a list of relevant artists, guide our investigation: Endings and Beginnings, Monochromania, Photoshop Killed the Photographer Killed the Painter, Market Mechanisms (and Academic Exercises), Regional Painting, and Narrative. When possible, current exhibitions will be discussed. The course will be seminar style sessions interspersed with critique and discussion of the work of enrolled students.

    Major elective; Painting seniors only.

    < Permission of Instructor required.

  2. Collaborative Study

    A Collaborative Study Project (CSP) allows two students to work collaboratively to complete a faculty supervised project of indepedndent study.

    Usually, a CSP is supervised by two faculty members, but with approval it may be supervised by one faculty member. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses, though it is not a substitute for a course if that course is regularly offered.

  3. Color Studio

    This studio-based course will provide the foundation necessary to understand basic color theory and practice in painting, art, and design. An historical and cultural perspective will be introduced to inform ongoing color studies executed in the studio. Students will acquire the vocabulary to articulate color phenomena and the means to exploit the expressive potential of color in their work. Color studies will be principally created with gouache, and a variety of other materials and means will also be explored. Lectures, demonstrations, and museum visits will supplement studio work. A short research paper is required.

    Elective; open to all majors.

  4. Contemporary Art And Criticism

    This is the second part of a two-class sequence, with Introductory Prehistory of Contemporary Art as a prerequisite.

    This class, required for painting majors in spring semester of their junior year, is devoted to the development of postmodern and contemporary art and culture from roughly 1989 to the present, introducing, contextualizing, and assessing how artists have addressed the discourses around medium, technology, globalization, colonialism, social justice, the environment in that time, how their work has been shaped by other spheres of cultural production, and how critics have responded to and theorized the art of the recent past and the present day.

    There will be a field-trip to Dia Beacon during the semester.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  5. Critical Curating

    The history of painting and the trajectory of radical exhibition models in the post-war period have always seemed divergent, even antithetical: the former pursued autonomy, then, more recently, returned to narrative and figuration, while the latter took cue, both morphologically and discursively, from installation, sited, and conceptual art. This course counters such assumptions by examining post-war painting in tandem with key moments in curating (eg. Alanna Heiss' PS1; Okwui Enwezor's Documenta XI; Jerome Sans and Nicolas Bourriaud's Palais de Tokyo; and Dan Cameron's Prospect 1). The course's second half, at once more speculative and hands on, uses the Painting Gallery as a test site for mounting an exhibition or exhibitions, with emphasis on the peculiarities that painting - bounded, rectilinear, and flat - presents. Readings to include Bruce Altschuler, Julie Ault, Thomas Crow, Thierry de Duve, Hal Foster, Brian O'Doherty and others.

    The course has a fee for two field trips to New York.

    Elective

    Open to senior and above.

    Permission of Instructor required.

  6. Drawing II

    A continued examination and development of drawing skills. This course is coordinated with Painting II.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  7. EHP Sprg:studio Concentration

    In this intensive independent studio students continue and complete the work began in "EHP Studio Elective", culminating in the final exhibition and review. It corresponds to the remaining eight weeks of the program, after students have finished with their Art History and Italian classes.

    Note: EHP credits replace the on-campus major requirements for the term students attend. Distribution to non-major requirements occurs when major credits are not needed.

  8. EHP Studio Elective

    Independent studio is at the core of the EHP experience. Upon arrival, students are assigned studio space at the Palazzetto Cenci, home of RISD's program in Rome. With guidance from the chief critic, each student develops a personal body of work sparked by his/her interactions with places, people and circumstances in Rome and other locations that are part of the EHP tours (such as the Northern, Southern or Eastern tours, as well as other shorter trips.) The work takes as a point of departure knowledge and techniques specific to individual home departments, but allows, and even encourages, explorations beyond disciplinary boundaries, including collaborations and cross-fertilization within a group of students from different departments working together.

    Beyond consistent and thorough engagement with studio work, requirements include participation in open studios and exhibitions, presentations in reviews, and attendance to all group activities and events, such as lectures at the Cenci and other institutions. From time to time, the chief critic may issue short assignments to introduce or focus on a particular subject. As part of the studio elective, students may be encouraged to keep sketchbooks and/or diaries, participate in optional activities--such as figure drawing sessions--and search for brief internships, apprenticeships, or other forms of interactions with local artists, designers, curators and critics.

    EHP Studio Elective corresponds to the first twelve weeks of the program, while students are also taking Art History and Italian classes. This course establishes the direction for the work in the "Studio Concentration" course that follows.

    Note: EHP credits replace the on-campus major requirements for the term students attend. Distribution to non-major requirements occurs when major credits are not needed.

  9. Graduate Paint Studio Critique II

    This period is designed for the student to evaluate and analyze and pursue the directions he/she established in Grad Paint Studio Critique I. Group and individual critiques will occur by resident faculty and visiting artists and critics during the semester.

    Graduate major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  10. Graduate Painting Studio Thesis

    This period is designed for development and presentation of a body of work supported by a written thesis in consultation with resident faculty, visiting artists and critics during the semester. A final exhibition of work will be evaluated by a jury of Painting Faculty Members.

    Graduate major requirement

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  11. ISP Major

    The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses.

    Permission of instructor and GPA of 3.0 or higher is required.

    Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; the course is not available via web registration.

  12. Introductory Prehistory Of Contemporary Art

    This class, required for painting majors in spring semester of sophomore year, describes five defining features of modernity, providing the broad historical backdrop for their "invention": the individual, globalization, nature, industrialization, and abstraction. The first half of the class will be devoted to the visual art of varied geographic and cultural settings prior to and during the rise of these paradigms. The second half of the class slows to focus in greater detail on the high modernist manifestations of each of those themes (interiority, capital, environment, technology, and narrative), and uses them to contextualize the art and culture of the 20th century. Periods, places, and subjects will be introduced through secondary sources, providing a critical lens through which to connect the material to present day art, culture, politics, and experience (for instance, the rise of global trade will be seen through the lens of postcolonial theory). The material for the course ends at approximately 1989, setting the stage for a more in-depth look at contemporary art, culture, and criticism in their junior year course. Sophomore major requirement; Painting majors only

  13. Meaning In The Medium Of Painting

    This first-year graduate seminar approaches painting as a technical skill, a historical practice and an intellectual project. Weekly sessions begin with group discussions of key readings about recent painting. Readings are organized in three sections. The first looks backward, to the problem of medium that preoccupied modernist painting and, residually, contemporary practices until the 1980s. The second section looks at two phenomena, the academy and the art market, and their effect on how painting is produced, disseminated, discussed and received. The third, the most speculative, looks laterally at a range of contemporary practices from the 1990s to the present.

    Graduate elective

    Permission of Instructor required.

  14. Painterly Prints

    This course offers a more painterly approach to the intaglio process. The students will produce applications of intaglio, such as collographs, large color monotypes and collage. Growth of imagery and technique will be encouraged through medium. A portfolio of prints will be produced.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Permission of Instructor required.

  15. Painting Degree Project

    This is a comprehensive course designed to test the student's ability to create, complete, and document a Degree Project of his or her choosing. The Degree Project should be a distinct, carefully conceived, exhibition-ready body of work which reflects the issues and objectives of your art. The Senior Degree Project is distinct from your Woods-Gerry Gallery exhibition, although its work can overlap with that exhibition.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  16. Painting From Observation

    This course is a comprehensive introduction to painting. It will be designed to develop confidence and experience with paint and painting. We will examine historical and contemporary trends and paint from life models and photo sources. Fundamental techniques for basic ground preparation, oil painting mediums and direct as well as indirect processes will be taught. Representational painting will be the primary focus but experiences in abstract painting will also be encouraged. We will learn abstract principles that organize composition, depict spatial illusion and describe form while developing a shared language for critiques. No prior painting experience is required.

  17. Painting II

    The purpose of this course is to continue development based on Painting I. Individual expression will be encouraged through a series of larger works which require greater time and organizational skill. Experimentation in different painting media, including oil, acrylic, watercolor and mixed media will be encouraged. Group and individual critiques are required. Outside work will be assigned.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  18. Painting III

    The primary goal of this course will be to shift the responsibility of direction, problem-solving and problem- development from the Faculty Instructor to the student. But this will be accomplished with a great deal of faculty involvement and support. The class will begin with group assignments which will become increasingly independent. Group and individual critiques will continue as an integral part of the curriculum, with an emphasis on contemporary art and criticism.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  19. Painting Iv

    This will be a continuation of directions established in Painting III. Student work will be evaluated through group and individual critiques. Visiting Artist lectures will be important to the issues of contemporary art emphasized at this level. The department will schedule an individual review with a Faculty Committee for each student during this course.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  20. Painting Refocus: Material Explorations

    Working with a wide variety of materials, different approaches to physicality and surface, and inventive methods of deploying color other than by brush, this "painting" course will make works that occupy the space of the wall familiar to painting - but not its most traditional conventions. Encouraging idiosyncratic, individualistic art making with a heightened attention to the tactile nature of materials students will explore visual culture through informed readings and targeted artists. "Art supplies" will come from Home Depot and recycling as much as Utrecht and Blick. Employing the recycled, the found and gathered, the manufactured and the natural, the art made will be critiqued for both presence and meaning. Assignments will be introduced through the screening of classic Sci-Fi films that will act as a prompt for each project.

    Open to all majors.

Departments

Apparel Design Architecture Ceramics Digital + Media Experimental and Foundation Studies Film / Animation / Video Furniture Design Glass Graduate Studies Graphic Design History of Art + Visual Culture History, Philosophy + the Social Sciences Illustration Industrial Design Interior Architecture Jewelry + Metalsmithing Landscape Architecture Literary Arts + Studies Painting Photography Printmaking Sculpture Teaching + Learning in Art + Design Textiles