Fall 2017

  1. Advanced Critical Issues

    What is the meaning of the contemporary? Is it a specific temporal constellation, the fall-out from modernism, a condition of the present or rather the artist's role? And if we look into the darkness of the present-what might we see and what stories would we tell? We have entered yet another crisis of representation, one with its own distinct historical stakes. What pressures does this place on us as makers of objects, writing, encounters? How does our work orient itself to these questions? Grad Critical Issues takes up these questions through multiple logics -of the object, of the aesthetic, of the speculative, of the phenomenological, of the psychoanalytic, of the ecological and economic-to consider how trajectories of form and narrative intersect in contemporary sculpture.

    Through readings, lectures, and class discussions, we will examine discursive approaches to making, writing and thinking about sculptural practice, specifically attending to its historic, aesthetic, ethical, and curatorial contexts. Opening with Rosalind Krauss's seminal text "Sculpture in the Expanded Field," we trace the force of her thinking through Walter Benjamin, Marcel Duchamp, Minimalism, Land Art; consider the genealogies of Harold Szeemann's exhibition When Attitudes Become Form in light of Massimiliano Gioni's Unmonumental or Helen Molesworth's Part Objects/Part Sculpture, as examples. Additional readings include: Theodor Adorno, Giorgio Agamben, Sara Ahmed, Hal Foster, Sigmund Freud, Karl Marx, Rebecca Solnit, among others. Student generated research drawn from studio practice will also inform the dialogue.

    Major requirement; Sculpture majors only.

    Registration by Sculpture Department, course not available via web registration.

  2. Advanced Critical Issues II

    What is the meaning of the contemporary? Is it a specific temporal constellation, the fall-out from modernism, a condition of the present or rather the artist's role? And if we look into the darkness of the present-what might we see and what stories would we tell? We have entered yet another crisis of representation, one with its own distinct historical stakes. What pressures does this place on us as makers of objects, writing, encounters? How does our work orient itself to these questions? Grad Critical Issues takes up these questions through multiple logics -of the object, of the aesthetic, of the speculative, of the phenomenological, of the psychoanalytic, of the ecological and economic-to consider how trajectories of form and narrative intersect in contemporary sculpture.

    Through readings, lectures, and class discussions, we will examine discursive approaches to making, writing and thinking about sculptural practice, specifically attending to its historic, aesthetic, ethical, and curatorial contexts. Opening with Rosalind Krauss's seminal text "Sculpture in the Expanded Field," we trace the force of her thinking through Walter Benjamin, Marcel Duchamp, Minimalism, Land Art; consider the genealogies of Harold Szeemann's exhibition When Attitudes Become Form in light of Massimiliano Gioni's Unmonumental or Helen Molesworth's Part Objects/Part Sculpture, as examples. Additional readings include: Theodor Adorno, Giorgio Agamben, Sara Ahmed, Hal Foster, Sigmund Freud, Karl Marx, Rebecca Solnit, among others. Student generated research drawn from studio practice will also inform the dialogue.

    Graduate major elective; Sculpture majors only.

  3. Advanced Wood Fabrication For Sculpture

    This is a hands-on studio course focusing on three-dimensional object making, primarily working with wood as a medium. We develop an integration of intuitive approaches and structured processes through direct engagement with the materials. In addition to guiding the student through the various technical hurdles encountered as the projects unfold, an equal stress is placed on the development of the ideas and intent - and those ideas successfully expressed through the materials and its manipulation. At critical times, a slide presentation is given, followed by a general, open discussion on the relevant topics and how they relate to the class Estimated material cost: $200.00

  4. Casting Studio

    This course is designed to build upon the fundamental principles of mold making and casting while exploring more complex concepts, materials, and techniques. The transformative process of casting can embody the signs of growth or decay, of evolution and metamorphosis. From cellular multiplicity to large scale sculptures, casting skills enable the artist to control the sensation of the finished work through a spectrum of materials and processes.

    Through demonstrations then hands-on exploration, students will pursue individual projects that reflect upon themes in sculpture that utilize casting for its unique versatility. Students will have extensive exposure to a variety of traditional and nontraditional materials. Processes will include multi-part shell molds, gypsum and composite materials for shell construction, urethane and silicone rubber, castable plastics, cold cast metals, and material specific release agents. We will review the possible health hazards associated with casting, and learn safe working methods, as well as have in-class discussions about concept and craft, various fabrication and finishing methods, and uses for molds in the making sculpture.

    This class is for junior Sculpture majors and non-major students by permission of Instructor.

    Registration by Sculpture Department, course not available via web registration.

  5. Collaborative Study

    A Collaborative Study Project (CSP) allows two students to work collaboratively to complete a faculty supervised project of independent study.

    Usually, a CSP is supervised by two faculty members, but with approval it may be supervised by one faculty member. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses, though it is not a substitute for a course if that course is regularly offered.

  6. Graduate Studio I

    Students pursue individual work under advisement of resident faculty, visiting artists and critics during the semester. Individual objectives are clarified and professional practices are discussed. Group interaction and discussions are expected.

    Graduate major requirement; Sculpture majors only.

    Registration by Sculpture Department, course not available via web registration.

  7. Graduate Studio III

    Students pursue individual work under advisement of resident faculty, visiting artists and critics during the semester. Individual objectives are clarified and professional practices are discussed. Group interaction and discussions are expected.

    Graduate major requirement; Sculpture majors only.

    Registration by Sculpture Department, course not available via web registration.

  8. ISP Major

    The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses.

    Permission of instructor and GPA of 3.0 or higher is required.

    Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; the course is not available via web registration.

  9. ISP Non-major Elective

    The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses.

    Permission of instructor and GPA of 3.0 or higher is required.

    Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; the course is not available via web registration.

  10. Installation

    We will create a unique learning environment where a classroom space is dedicated solely to the making and the display of the course work for the duration of the semester. This approach will encourage the participants to generate work that cannot be "carted in and carted out for a critique". The opportunity creates a unique format for interacting and making work within RISD's academic and facility structure. The explorations in this course are based on the fact that absolutely everything is a material and that everything can be manipulated using conditional approaches, responses and skills.

    We will start with fundamental skills that use; contextual influences, site specific analysis and behavioral observations. The emphasis will always be on making. You must be willing to adapt the way you work and collaborate with one another during the development and fabrication of every exploration. There will be occasions when you are used as material to be worked with.

    After a series of investigations and assignments, studio participants will generate work that is connected to their own interests. Together we will also create an environment within the room that supports the optimum display for all of the individual works. Everyone will be required to document their individual process and contribute to a final class compilation. This course supports the exploration and engagement of interdisciplinary and experiential learning.

    Major elective

    Open to junior and above

    Open to non-majors by permission of Department.

    Course not available via web registration.

  11. Junior Sculpture: Studio I

    This course helps students develop a clear direction for their sculpture. Readings, discussions and slide presentations on contemporary art and culture supplement the studio work and critiques. Students are expected to research and present a talk on a subject of their choice.

    Major requirement; Sculpture majors only.

    Registration by Sculpture Department, course not available via web registration.

  12. Performance: Object, Body, Narrative

    This course explores questions and methods central to performance, and in particular the relationship between performance and sculpture. Temporal and spatial dimensions of both sculpture and performance will be discussed in terms of the performance "prop" as sculpture, sculptural outcomes of performance, and sculptural documentation of performance. We will examine performance in its social, political, formal, and corporeal aspects, engaging questions of ritual, labor, and movement. Approaching sculpture in both the conventional and the "expanded" senses of the term, we will pose the question of "immaterial" sculptural forms and actions. We will consider immaterial "sculpture" as performance while also considering traditional sculpture's material concerns as performative. Sculptural material concerns of process and technique; site and context; and objects and objecthood will all be examined as performance prompts. Art historical and political questions of power, agency, audience, gaze, attention, and passivity will take shape as we theorize and enact performativity and its relation to embodiment, display, and language. Through individual and collaborative work, students will create and critique performances. A range of text, sound, lens, and object-based documentation will be encouraged. Documentation will be considered both as representational and as generative.

    Open to sophomore and above.

    Open to non-majors with permission of Instructor.

  13. Professional Internship

    The professional Internship provides valuable exposure to a professional setting, enabling students to better establish a career path and define practical aspirations. Internship proposals are carefully vetted to determine legitimacy and must meet the contact hour requirements listed in the RISD Course Announcement.

  14. Retooling The Studio Tool Kit

    This course is structured according the notion that artists can use what is on hand to research and craft simple solutions to the complex physical, mechanical, and technical problems that must be routinely addressed in their making practices. This material and process based, hands-on, research studio will be structured in response to the issues that the advanced fine arts student is grappling with on a regular basis. Many of the issues that arise in the process of making provide the opportunity to transcend perceived material-based boundaries and thinking. Some of the questions this course attends to include: How do you defy gravity? How do you generate the hidden components required to physicalize the thing we can see in our mind's eye? How is the magic we need to create our work scalable to the resources we have readily available? Example working processes include: mig welding, tig welding, casting for prototyping, woodworking, and mold making.

    Open to Fine Arts majors only.

    Permission of Instructor required.

  15. Sculptural Fabric Structures

    This class is a hands-on studio elective that explores the potential of fabric as a sculpture material. We will spend the semester looking at useful examples of how fabrics have been utilized in a broad range of engineered solutions. Fabrics can be flexible, transparent, impermeable, delicate, rigid, lightweight, and stronger than steel. How has fabric been used to represent other materials in art? We will explore how fabric is being used in architecture, advertising, fashion, and design. We will consider the diverse functionality of all kinds of fabric and plastic materials and explore how these materials are engineered for specific purposes. We will study inflatable fabric structures as they have been engineered for art, architecture, advertising and functional objects. Students will build their own projects after learning the basics of patternmaking, assembly, and surface manipulation.

    Open to junior and above.

    Class will be held at a Brown University location, John Street Studios, per special arrangement.

    Permission of Instructor required.

  16. Sculptural Practices I

    This course is an introduction to the six major practices that are essential to the study of Sculpture. These practices include an introduction to wood, digital imaging, plaster, performance, installation, and metal. Over the course of the year, students will be exposed to four week intensives designed to augment their major studio experience. The course begins with wood to expedite the speed of moving from ideation to physicality. From wood, the group moves to digital imaging where basic skills in video editing, photographic documentation, and projection within the built environment are explored. Plaster as a medium is paired with performance as an activity, both of which underscore the importance of the body within the field of Sculpture. Once students have produced objects, videos, and performances, the group moves into considering the fundamentals of installation and metal fabrication so that the architectures that house myriad artworks can be understood as part of the modality of Sculpture. Students can expect to learn proficiency and safety in all of these areas. Students can expect to expand these skills in advanced studio electives in the Junior and Senior years. This course is required for all Sophomore Sculpture majors.

    Major requirement; sophomore Sculpture majors only.

    Registration by Sculpture Department; Course not available via web registration.

  17. Senior Sculpture: Studio I

    This studio builds upon the work accomplished in the Junior studio. Students are expected to clarify their objectives, fine tune their technical abilities and develop a strong working attitude. Starting with some assigned projects and working toward independence and individual problem-seeking and solving. A high level of dialog and work is expected at this juncture. Throughout the fall, students will practice engaging their source research into their studio practice. Presentation of work in group and individual critiques will continue as an integral part of the curriculum, with an emphasis on contemporary art and criticism.

    Major requirement; Sculpture majors only.

    Registration by Sculpture Department, course not available via web registration.

  18. Sophomore Sculpture: Studio I

    This beginning sculpture studio encounter is organized to train students to workshop their ideas and concepts with the basic materials and processes of the sculpture studio. In this department we teach visual vocabulary on the basic principle of, "Thinking while making and making while thinking."

    The assignments in the Fall Sophomore studio parallels the exercises in technical skills taught in WOOD AND METAL SHOP PRACTICE I.

    Students will begin working in sculpture specific metal fabrication methods. Students may expect to gain proficiency in gas, TIG and MIG welding techniques, along with hot and cold forming methods.

    The second half of the fall semester is focused on sculpture specific wood fabrication methods. Students will acquire skills in methods of cutting and joining alongside methods of forming and lamination.

    Fees: Students are required to purchase a substantial selection of tools.

    Major requirement; Sculpture majors only.

    Registration by Sculpture Department, course not available via web registration.

  19. The Artist's Machine: Electricity And Electronics For Artists

    Students learn the basics of electricity and electronics while focusing on how to use microcontrollers (one chip computers) in conjunction with sensors, lights, motors, switchers, audio signals, and basic mechanics in works of art. Projects include timekeepers, simple robots, and interactive environments. Readings and slide/video lectures encompass artist-built machines and sculpture from 1900 to the present. Students can expect to spend time outside of class reading and programming, as well as designing and constructing. No previouis experience with electronics is required. Students should have taken a basic computer art course and, ideally, a sculpture course. Computer programming and machine shop skills are definitely a plus.

    Major elective

    Open to non-majors by permission of Instructor.

Wintersession 2018

  1. Interactive Installation

    Interactive art asks for the presence of external participation to realize itself. This studio course explores the possibilities and limitations of creating interactive and participatory art objects and installations. Students will bring their own conceptual, theoretical, and material concerns to the realm of interactivity. During the semester, we will discuss ideas of site, audience, performance, functionality, and collaboration. While understanding that the response and involvement of an "audience," is an important part of interactive art, we will consider the ethical ramifications of artist as facilitator, while also, complicating the notion of authorship. Within the course we will ask who or what this audience may be, the roles and agencies of the artists/participants and conspire new ways of eroding the distinction between artist and "passive" spectator. What can interactive art be in an age of "prosumers," increased digitality, and individual autonomy? Or what does it mean to perform facilitation? Students are strongly encouraged to work collectively and experimentally, challenging the boundaries of materials, space, and time. This class is open to all multidisciplinary artists with an interest in creating interactive objects and installation art. Projects can range from poetry and literature to video and sculpture.

    Estimated materials cost: $150, BUT are highly dependent on the student's preferred choice of medium and materials.

  2. Iron In Winter

    Iron, as a material for sculpture, has a unique visual quality and history separate from Bronze and other traditional art metals. As one of the oldest and most common elements in the universe, it makes up the core of our planet and it runs through our veins. Artists respond to the transformation of Iron from elemental Earth to a liquid state fueled by fire; emerging as a new solid form, with an organic life that changes over time as it begins the slow return to its origin. We embrace the mechanical and architectural heritage of this material and its role in the Industrial Revolution; we marvel at its structure and strength, or its crystalline surface and depth, while adopting its history or reinventing its meaning within our own work.

    In this course we will explore form, material and process as we use cast Iron as a material for sculpture. We will delve into the physics of the furnace, and the technical aspects of casting Iron using RISD's first homemade blast furnace. Students will receive hands on experience in this vigorous and physical process of preparing and running an Iron Cupola, reclaiming and smashing up radiators and bathtubs to give them new life as sculpture. The course will culminate in an Iron Pour of work created in class, then return to the studio to complete the projects.

    This course requires prior experience with casting and will also involve hands on physical activity in the preparation for the pour.

    Open to sophomore and above.

  3. Luminous Structures: Glass, Art, And Architecture

    Within an interdisciplinary group of RISD students and making facilities, this 5-week Wintersession course will provide the practical, historical, and theoretical foundation for students interested in working with flat, architectural glass and mirror in their emerging art and architecture practices. This course will introduce an array of glass materials and processes, and associated ideas of transparency, translucency, reflection, light, interaction, site, spatial illusion, opticality, and perception, in order to support students in taking these ideas on-board at RISD and beyond.

    Coursework will be centred on a series of hands-on studio projects that will be augmented with presentations and readings on the history of glass production, its technical innovation as a driving the Modernism that reshaped our cities, Paul Scheerbart's fantastical writings on glass and light, as well as artists, designers, and architects for whom architectural glass and mirror has been a principle means of artistic expression. The city of Providence, in its public art and architecture, will serve as a subject of study and laboratory for testing site-specific ideas.

    Luminous Concepts: Glass, Art, and Architecture will begin with an introduction to particular rapid-prototyping tools in Co-Works, relevant processes within the RISD Glass Department, and a library of materials from which to work. Complementing making resources will be site visits to local public art and architecture, presentations, videos, and readings on the history of glass, documentation surveying projects internationally, and group discussions. As resources allow, we will visit a local fabricator in order to illustrate how the rapid prototyping tools in Co-Works' serve as a first step in the production of larger scale work.

    Student projects will progress from experiments with glass materials and processes according to their interests and disciplines, through to projects ranging from unique artworks, installations, public art proposals, and architectural interventions. Transparent and reflective materials like acrylic sheet, mirrored plexi, and 3D prints will be completely acceptable substitutes for traditional glass material within this course.

    Estimated Material Cost $300

  4. Nerds Gone Wild: The Artist's Lab

    How can science inform art? Art has fed from science since the beginning of art making; from ingredients for pigments to the engineering of installations. There are many parallelisms between art and science that can be explored in art making. Through an exploration of the science of material, science as artistic research and science as art object, this course searches for common ground between these two discourses. Students will be introduced to the resources available to them in the Nature Lab and critical ways of engaging with them. This is a studio class where making and meaning are both propelled by scientific curiosity. Collaboration and interdisciplinary work is encouraged, let your geek flag fly.

  5. Operational Drawing

    What is Operational Drawing? Akin to dance, drawing just might be the next human activity that engages a spontaneous simultaneous interplay of thought, action and acting upon. This workshop will make inroads into answering the question by making works that address how we image the body in time and space with tools and media.

    One of the genuine albeit complex truths about the act of drawing lies within the root word. You can draw straws, draw a breath, draw nearer, draw water, draw cards, draw a crowd, draw out, draw down, draw upon, draw a blank, draw a bead, draw attention. You can also draw a line. In doing so you are drawing upon a vast constellation of your resources. Impulse, desire, vision, philosophical thought, emotion, concept, motor skills large and small. These on board fuels are at once focused, then invested into a simple tool leaving traces on a surface in time and space. How an idea, concept, or emotion makes it's way to shape and form is right here in the triad of mind, hand and tool. You may draw a beautifully imagined thought but it s the the hand in motion and the practice of training the hand to guide the tools that make simple lines transmit these sensations through time and space to an audience.

    In this studio we will be working together and individually to explore how drawing is might to your studio practice. Drawing as a practice has often been somewhat mistakenly viewed as a preparatory or even secondary element within traditional studio practices like painting, sculpture and printmaking. Today in an expanded field, those outmoded viewpoints only stand to unfairly discriminate and rank modes of realizing concept and form. It is also true that this archaic view of drawing has origins in the humble materials often associated within the practice, such as charcoal, graphite and chalk and carbon black (ink), geological elements all. The substrates being skin and fiber. In a contemporary studio practice it is the artist's prerogative to either work with or challenge historical presets. The role of drawing in a contemporary studio practice may play multiple roles. Together we will look at, practice and explore that very thing trough installations, group projects and large scale immersive work.

  6. Professional Internship

    The professional Internship provides valuable exposure to a professional setting, enabling students to better establish a career path and define practical aspirations. Internship proposals are carefully vetted to determine legitimacy and must meet the contact hour requirements listed in the RISD Course Announcement.

Spring 2018

  1. Advanced Critical Issues Seminar II

    Advanced Critical Issues Seminar 2 introduces a rigorous theoretical framework for thinking and writing about contemporary sculpture practice. Each seminar develops from a specific theme drawing on research from Grad Critical Issues 1, current debates in the field and contemporary events. Past seminars include: Artificial Natures, Precarious Relations, Frankenstein and Crime, Vanishing Points, as examples. Trespassing across sculpture, performance, cinema, fiction, feminist, queer, race and political theory and back again, we will address writings by Walter Benjamin, Lauren Berlant, Judith Butler, Gilles Deleuze, Michel Foucault, Maggie Nelson, Claudia Rankine, Jacques Rancire (as examples) in conversation with contemporary artists writings and projects to cultivate a conceptual grammar to extend to our studio practice. Approaching issues in contemporary sculpture through these discursive perspectives generates new strategies simultaneously material, conceptual, and critical.

    Graduate major requirement; Sculpture majors only.

    Registration by Sculpture Department, course not available via web registration.

  2. Digital Design And Fabrication

    This course will explore digital design and fabrication within the context of contemporary art, design, and architecture. Through a series of technical demonstrations, students will make connections between CAD/CAM software, digital fabrication technologies and the physical world. Students will become familiar with digital fabrication as it relates to traditional sculptural processes such as mold making/casting, metalworking and woodworking.

    Students will undertake a series of projects exploring 3D model creation using various CAD applications, 3D scanning technologies, and experimental approaches to digital model generation. Simultaneously, digital models will be made physical through additive and subtractive fabrication technologies including 3D printing, CNC milling, and laser cutting. The course will culminate with an ambitious final project encouraging students to blend digital fabrication technologies with their existing studio practice and/or research interest. The class will use Rhino3d as the primary CAD tool and students will need their own laptop with Rhino installed. The Mac version of Rhino is currently a free download and the Windows version is available at student pricing through rhino3d.com.

    Elective

    Open to sophomore and above.

    Open to non-majors by permission of Instructor.

  3. Graduate Sculpture Thesis Project

    Students present a body of work supported by a written thesis to a thesis committee for evaluation.

    Major requirement; Sculpture majors only.

    Registration by Sculpture Department, course not available via web registration.

  4. Graduate Studio II

    Students pursue individual work under advisement of resident faculty, visiting artists and critics during the semester. Individual objectives are clarified and professional practices are discussed. Group interaction and discussions expected.

    Graduate major requirement; Sculpture majors only.

    Registration by Sculpture Department, course not available via web registration.

  5. ISP Major

    The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses.

    Permission of instructor and GPA of 3.0 or higher is required.

    Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; the course is not available via web registration.

  6. Junior Sculpture Studio II

    This course concentrates on the development of the student's individual sensibilities without the structure of specific assignments. The focus is on helping students develop a sustainable studio practice and locate their voice within it. Emphasis is placed on independent investigations and creative problem solving. Readings, discussions and slide presentations on contemporary art and culture or other relevant topics supplement the studio work and critiques.

    Major requirement, Sculpture majors only.

    Registration by Sculpture Department, course not available via web registration.

  7. Metal Fabrication Studio

    We will explore metal by cutting, machining, bending, warping,welding, stitching, binding, and altering the materials to pushand expand students skills and understanding of metal as material for sculpture. We will discuss, experiment and challenge the notion of metal as traditional industrial workhorse, or as coveted art object and embrace or reject these ideas as we create with this medium. Students will be encouraged to pursue other nontraditional uses of metal, through scavenging, collecting, transforming metal from various states into new surfaces and forms. With safety and ingenuity we will put into practice work of the hand and machine, use computer driven techniques in tandem with the deliberate and accidental to experiment with pattern, surface, line, form and color.

    This class is for junior Sculpture majors and non-major students by permission of Instructor.

    Registration by Sculpture Department, course not available via web registration.

  8. Retooling The Studio Tool Kit

    This course is structured according the notion that artists can use what is on hand to research and craft simple solutions to the complex physical, mechanical, and technical problems that must be routinely addressed in their making practices. This material and process based, hands-on, research studio will be structured in response to the issues that the advanced fine arts student is grappling with on a regular basis. Many of the issues that arise in the process of making provide the opportunity to transcend perceived material-based boundaries and thinking. Some of the questions this course attends to include: How do you defy gravity? How do you generate the hidden components required to physicalize the thing we can see in our mind's eye? How is the magic we need to create our work scalable to the resources we have readily available? Example working processes include: mig welding, tig welding, casting for prototyping, woodworking, and mold making.

    Open to Fine Arts majors only.

    Permission of Instructor required.

  9. Robotics

    This is a hands-on introduction to robotics for artists class. Topics covered include: machine shop practices, electronic construction and theory, and computer programming. Students will build robots and utilize robotic technology. Students are free to choose their own microcontroller platforms. Peripheral technology will employ servomotors and sensors. Readings will explore the interface between art and technology.

    Elective

    Restricted to senior, fifth-year, and graduate students.

    Permission of Instructor required.

    Also offered as DM-7013; Register into course for which credit is desired.

  10. Sculpting Speculative Space: Aesthetics, Symbolism, And Metaphor

    Sculpting Speculative Space serves as a gateway to our SciFi, technoscape where we question the West's future narrative in the age of "Mars as the New Frontier." This course calls for creating and making practices such as assemblage, collage, and compilation in both analog and digital modalities. Here we begin to understand how intentional, speculative space will centralize convergences of race, gender, and sexuality with various technologies. Sculpting Speculative Space will deconstruct and reappropriate the aesthetics of popular speculative fiction as symbolism and metaphor for the West's subconscious. Some questions we will ask include: What are the implications and impact of themes and trends throughout SciFi and what do they reinforce in reality? How has the cyborg been theorized and visualized? How have marginalized bodies been visualized or rendered invisible in speculative fiction? How do we produce work that visualizes a future that centralizes marginalized bodies, experiences, and identities?

    Estimated Material Cost: $75.00

  11. Sculptural Practices II

    This course is a continuiation of Sculptural Practices I. Students are introduced to the six major practices that are essential to the study of Sculpture. These practices include an introduction to wood, digital imaging, plaster, performance, installation, and metal. Over the course of the year, students will be exposed to four week intensives designed to augment their major studio experience. The course begins with wood to expedite the speed of moving from ideation to physicality. From wood, the group moves to digital imaging where basic skills in video editing, photographic documentation, and projection within the built environment are explored. Plaster as a medium is paired with performance as an activity, both of which underscore the importance of the body within the field of Sculpture. Once students have produced objects, videos, and performances, the group moves into considering the fundamentals of installation and metal fabrication so that the architectures that house myriad artworks can be understood as part of the modality of Sculpture. Students can expect to learn proficiency and safety in all of these areas. Students can expect to expand these skills in advanced studio electives in the Junior and Senior years. This course is required for all Sophomore Sculpture majors.

    Major requirement; sophomore Sculpture majors only.

    Registration by Sculpture Department; Course not available via web registration.

  12. Senior Sculp Degree Project

    Students are expected to continue the independent work developed in the fall senior studio. Over the course of the degree project semester students will present their work in the context of Duet shows". These "Duets" will be accompanied by a short video-taped interview between the partners based upon vetted questions germane to each others work. Seniors are expected to produce a significant group of work commensurate with the departments senior degree level criteria.

    Prerequisite: Senior Sculpture major in Good Academic Standing.

    Major requirement; Sculpture majors only.

    Registration by Sculpture Department, course not available via web registration.

  13. Sophomore Sculpture Studio II

    The Spring semester of Sophomore Sculpture Studio is organized to continue training students to workshop their ideas and concepts while learning basic materials and processes of the sculpture studio. In this department we teach visual vocabulary on the basic principle of, "Thinking while making and making while thinking."

    The assignment projects in the Spring studio parallels the exercises in technical skills taught in WOOD AND METAL SHOP PRACTICE II.

    Advancing from basic fabrication methods learned in the previous semester, students will progress into workshops in modeling, molding and casting. Students will learn the basic language of form through the lens of basic mold-making methods working in wax, plaster and clay advancing to contemporary silicones and plastics. This workshop will culminate with lost wax ceramic shell casting in our foundry.

    Major requirement; Sculpture majors only.

    Registration by Sculpture Department, course not available via web registration.

  14. Spatial Video

    Our eyes are nearly always drawn towards something moving over something inert. What innovative strategies can be employed to incorporate video, sculpture, and physical space into a single work, without one medium dominating the other? How can an artist resolve the fundamental differences between two-dimensional moving images and three-dimensional objects or space? This intensive studio elective will explore methods and issues of assimilating video, photography, sound, performance, objects, and space through studying and constructing multimedia sculpture and installations. Throughout the semester we will be presented with assignments that examine these different possibilities from multiple perspectives, including studio projects that deploy video in a sculptural context, and sculpture that is only activated through a video work. We will study the recent history of artists and designers who engage multimedia techniques and experiment with new formats and technologies. Students will learn the basics of DSLR camera technique, digital video editing, audio production, audio/video display technology, and installation techniques. Students in the course should have an understanding of sculptural materials and fabrication techniques, and should be ready to experiment with the fundamental structure of the presentation of media.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $150.00

    Open to sophomore and above.

Departments

Apparel Design Architecture Ceramics Digital + Media Experimental and Foundation Studies Film / Animation / Video Furniture Design Glass Graduate Studies Graphic Design History of Art + Visual Culture History, Philosophy + the Social Sciences Illustration Industrial Design Interior Architecture Jewelry + Metalsmithing Landscape Architecture Literary Arts + Studies Painting Photography Printmaking Sculpture Teaching + Learning in Art + Design Textiles