Teaching + Learning in Art + Design

Faculty

Nancy Friese

Professor Nancy Friese is a painter-printmaker in the lineage of American landscape artists. Her landscapes reflect nature’s forms using colors, lights, textures and spaces from a chosen view and a specific place. Friese’s paintings and prints have been exhibited in 30 solo shows and 170 group shows, nationally and internationally. The recipient of several prestigious competitions and awards, Friese was elected to the National Academy (Museum and School in New York City) and received three National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships, including the Japan-US Friendship Commission Creative Artist Fellowship.

She was granted a Yale University Summer School of Music and Art at Norfolk Fellowship, a Lila Acheson Wallace Giverny Fellowship, a Blanche E. Colman Award, Pollock-Krasner Foundation funding and a George Sugarman Foundation Grant for painting. Artist’s Resource Trust (ART) funded her exhibition and residency at Trustman Gallery. Her works are in 50 corporate and museum collections and over 100 private collections including the Museum of Fine arts, Boston, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Hammer Museum UCLA, the Spencer Museum of Art and the Portland Art Museum. She is a member of ArtTable, and her paintings and prints are represented by Cade Tompkins Projects in Providence.

Friese earned her BS from the University of North Dakota and her MFA in printmaking from Yale University School of Art. She studied in the graduate painting program at the University of California, Berkeley, and studied painting and printmaking at the Art Academy of Cincinnati. She came to RISD as head of Printmaking (1990–98) and initiated a teaching collaborative between RISD’s Graduate Division and Brown University during her subsequent tenure as Dean of Graduate Studies (1998–04). That collaborative has contributed to the advancement of collegiate-level teaching in the fields of art, design and architecture and has awarded teaching certificates to over 350 RISD graduate students and faculty.