Artists' Books Chosen as Keepers

Artists' Books Chosen as Keepers


Junior Stephanie Winarto 18 GD earned first prize in the RISD library’s 2017 Student Artists’ Book Juried Contest and Exhibition for her beautifully made book When Astronomy Grew Ears.

The piece is based on the first-ever detection of gravitational waves in 2015, when physicists heard and recorded two black holes that collided a billion light-years from earth.

Other top winners announced at the opening reception on Wednesday, February 22 are Niya Sun 20 EFS, who won second place for another intriguing intergalactic piece called Murmurs of Earth.

First-year student Aaron Teves BArch 20 earned the Memorial Award for The House Under a Crazy Star, a book he made as the final project in his fall semester Design studio.

Graduate student Charity Appell McNabb MA 17 earned the Laurie Whitehill Award—named in honor of the recently retired Special Collections librarian who helped build the Artists’ Book Collection—for Gathering for Meaning, an unbound book that allows the reader to better understand the gathering, sorting and associations involved in the creative process.

First-year student Maisie Wills 20 GD also earned special recognition for Oda a la Tipografía, a bilingual exploration of Pablo Neruda’s poem, Ode to Typography.

The Student Artists’ Book Exhibition remains on view through May 12 at the Fleet Library, with winning entries becoming part of the library’s permanent Artists’ Book Collection.

Liisa Silander

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