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Rhode Island Hospital and Rhode Island School of Design Organize Exhibition of Biomedical Research and Art

06/06/2013

Artists: Babette Allina, Boris Bally, Cybele Collins, Emma Hogarth, Dianne Reilly, Dean Snyder, Peter Snyder, Sophia Sobers, Torino/Margolis, Wendy Wahl, and Geoff Williams

Providence, R.I. [June 21, 2013] – Rhode Island Hospital and Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) present an exhibition that crosses disciplines to investigate visual manifestations and imaginings of biomedical research. Carrefour: Intersections of Biomedical Research and Artis a collection of visceral, virtual, whimsical and, in some cases, personal works by Rhode Island artists and medical practitioners.

The exhibition celebrates the 150th anniversary of Rhode Island Hospital and is being hosted by Lifespan (parent company of Rhode Island Hospital) and RISD Research Initiatives.  The public opening is on June 21, 5 – 7 p.m. in RISD’s Sol Koffler Gallery, 169 Weybosset Street. The exhibition will run June 21 – July 19. The gallery is open Wednesdays – Saturdays, noon – 5 p.m.

Carrefour: Intersections of Biomedical Research and Art, with work by 11 artists, includes artist Boris Bally, who allows a look at personal jewelry inspired by his wife’s medical practice and the birth of their first child (Reproductions: He Spoon, She Spoon and We Spoon); a performance by Torino:Margolis using neuromuscular stimulation tools,  “…to allow the audience to log into their bodies and control their movements remotely;” and Dean Snyder’s sculpture of tattooed, sewn and inflated rawhide. Snyder’s work has been characterized as ‘uncanny “graphical” organicism.’

An exhibition catalogue representing the work of the 11 artists with essays by Peter Snyder, Ph.D., senior vice president of Research at Lifespan, and Patricia C. Phillips, Dean of Graduate Studies/RISD will be available at the opening and in the RISD Store.

  


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The façade of the Chace Center, a new multipurpose hub that opened
in 2008, offers an interesting contrast to the historic campus
buildings that surround it.