Courses

Curriculum

pdf iconMFA Curriculum in Digital + Media 2013-14    

 

Courses

Fall Semester 2013
  • DM-7048

    BODIES IN MOTION

    Credits: 3.00

    This course approaches art practice informed by experiential research in the physics and neuroscience of moving bodies, mechanical engineering, and new media possibilities. The collaborative teaching team and visiting artists provide relevant skills training and push conceptual rigor and exploration in support of the development of each student's practice-specific project within the course. Students explore biological and mechanical constraints of moving systems. Working with our own bodies, athletes, dancers, simple machines, and kinetic sculpture, participants investigate diverse ways to represent and experience body motion. Traditional (pencil, pen, paper, clay) and new media (digital processing, cameras, projectors, mechanics, motors, electronics) are integrated in order to find new ways of compressing / expanding time, and capturing an essentially ephemeral experience. Student projects might include video work, performances, kinetic sculpture, or any form of choice central to each student's own work. The course builds a regular 'live sketch' practice in order to study dynamic systems as complex fundamental forms of human expression.
    Elective: Open to senior, fifth-year, graduate Permission of Instructor required.
  • DM-7108

    D+M GRAD STUDIO/SEM 3

    Credits: 3.00

    This course supports the exploration of theoretical, social, material, technical and contextual research and concerns in new media arts practice during the third semester of the D + M MFA program. It is a combined studio and seminar forum for Digital + Media second-year students. Students conceptualize and discuss their studio-based work and their ongoing practice as they begin the thesis process. Working artist bibliographies are developed - both projects and texts. Readings in critical cultural theory, media art theory, philosophy, semiotics and other areas further support the contextualization and grounding of the innovative practical and conceptual approaches of students in the Digital + Media department. The course is a mix of individual meetings, an optional lecture and workshop series and group critiques. Guest lecturers and visiting critics may also become involved with this class in terms of critical/research aspects. Each student will practice articulating their art process and work towards thesis, and will contribute to the dialogue concerning the research and work of their classmates.
    Graduate Major requirement: Digital + Media majors only
    Registration by Digital + Media department, course not available via web registration
  • DM-7100

    D+M GRADUATE STUDIO/SEMINAR I

    Credits: 6.00

    This course supports the exploration of theoretical, social, material, technical and contextual research and concerns in new media arts practice during the first year of the first year of the D + M MFA program. It is a combined studio and seminar forum for Digital + Media first-year students. Participants become familiar with a vocabulary of multiple practices within digital media and, through a rigorous, hands-on approach, develop a thorough understanding of computational media as it applies to her/his individual creative practice. Students are introduced to a core set of methodologies and technologies from basic electronics and programming to interaction design to installation, and are encouraged to break comfort zones and practice through experimentation. Students conceptualize and discuss their studio-based work and their ongoing practice. Readings in critical cultural theory, media art theory, philosophy, semiotics and other areas further ground the conceptual approach of students in the Digital + Media department. The course is a mix of individual meetings, a required lecture and workshop series and group critiques. Some guest lecturers and visiting critics may also become involved with this class in terms of critical/research aspects. With a focus on studio experimentation and production, students will conceptualize and discuss their works-in-progress while beginning to work with new materials and systems in combination with a broad range media. Each student will practice articulating their ongoing studio art process and work, and will contribute to the dialogue concerning the research and work of their classmates.
    Graduate major requirement; Digital + Media majors only
    Registration by Digital + Media department, course not available via web registration
    Open to first-year graduate
  • DM-7103

    DIGITAL MEDIA PERSPECTIVES: HISTORY OF MEDIA ART

    Credits: 3.00

    In this historical survey, we analyze the aesthetic conventions, narratives, and formats of works in new media. We examine the impact digital technologies and new media have had on existing media, as well as the ways in which new media function as a unique system of communication. While investigating the aesthetic conventions, economic conditions and infrastructures that affect the production of new media, we address the social and political contexts in which new media are disseminated, interpreted and privileged. We make connections across decades by focusing on the recurring themes of language, futurism, simulation, hyper-reality, transnationality and information.
    Graduate major requirement; Digital + Media majors only
    Registration by Digital + Media department, course not available via web registration
    Open to first-year graduate
  • DM-7197

    DIGITAL MEDIA THESIS PREP

    Credits: 3.00

    In "On Permission to Write", essayist Cynthia Ozick distinguishes between the "good-citizen writer" and the "shaman-writer" The first, she says, writes dutifully; the second, "obsessively", "torrentially", and most crucially, with self-given permission. For artists and designers who have, by and large, favored visual over written expression, obsession and torrent probably come more naturally in the studio than on the page. This course seeks to bring that same uninhibited, exploratory, and illuminating sensibility to the thesis, to suggest that writing is not a duty, but rather can be integral to studio practice. We will look at writing about one's work -- its art-historical, theoretical, and personal sources; its form and process; its motivation; its interpretation -- as a kind of translation from form to language (one that can be as individual and authentic as our chosen materials). The course will include writing exercises designed to help us think more deeply and coherently about our work and ideas, as well as discussion of assigned readings. The readings are exclusively written by artists and designers: criticism, manifestos, journal writings, and artist interviews - a selection intended to suggest that in permitting themselves to write, artists and designers establish artistic agency, lineage, and history itself through that writing.
    Graduate major requirement, Digital + Media majors only
    Registration by Digital + Media department, course not available via web registration
    Open to second-year graduates
  • DM-7001

    INTERACTIVE TEXT-INTERACTIVE SOUND AND IMAGE EMPHASIS

    Credits: 3.00

    This course introduces the student to narrative and non-narrative experimentation with language in digital space, presented as fine art practice. Creation of elaborate imagery and animations with digital tools such as Illustrator, InDesign, Photoshop, Flash and Final Cut as well as the basics of audio production, recording, arranging and sequencing with programs like Pro Tools and Ableton Live and other basic analog recording techniques. The course balances conceptual concerns related to content and structuring methodologies with artistic expression. Specific aesthetic histories are explored tracing the use of text in artistic practice including Concrete Poetry, the texts of Kurt Schwitters, Russian Constructivist posters, Fluxus poetic works, The Dada and Surrealist Word/Image, Magritte, Jenny Holtzer, Ed Ruscha, Barbara Kruger as well as other contemporary practitioners.
    Elective, Open to senior, graduate
    Also offered as GRAPH 7001. Register in the course for which credit is desired.
  • DM-7021

    INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE PROGRAMMING

    Credits: 3.00

    This course will teach basic programming concepts with a focus on processing and web-based applications. Beyond basic cross-language technical skills, the course will also ground software practices in a critical context to examine how and why contemporary artists choose to use software, how software written by artists gets used and disseminated via the web, and how software practices intersect with traditions of performance art and public art. Students will create case studies of software-based art projects to gain greater understanding of the social, political and technological forces at work in software development. The course will explore variables, functions, data structures, loops, conditionals, web architectures -- and various approaches to the software development process -- iterative design, debugging, unit testing, usability. Students will collaboratively experiment with different programming languages such as ActionScript, PHP and Processing along with XML and mySQL data sources to develop web-based software projects.
    No prior programming experience is necessary.
    Elective; graduate level
    Open to senior, fifth-year, space permitting.
  • DM-3054

    INVESTIGATING NORMAL

    Credits: 3.00

    Assistive technologies usually refer to prosthetics and medical aids: tools, devices, and other gear that either restore or augment the functioning of body parts. Historically, these have been designed for people with diagnosable disabilities. In this course, we look at medical as well as cultural tools that investigate the "normal" body and mind, and we design our own devices-high-tech, low-tech, digital or analog-with these ideas in mind. Through readings, site visits, guest speakers, and projects, we investigate both traditional and unusual prosthetics and assistive technologies, broadly defined. We talk to end-users, to engineers and industrial designers, to artists, and to others whose technologies assist with visible and invisible needs, externalize hidden dynamics, and create capacities far beyond or outside ordinary functionality. The course is organized to facilitate both projects in industrial design and projects that are much more speculative and experimental. Open to all majors, graduate students and upper-level undergraduate students.
    Course Level: Graduate
  • DM-7152

    RESEARCH PROJECT

    Credits: 3.00

    This class takes the form of a series of group meetings to explore work related to student selected research projects. Each student may work on his/her own project, or work with the instructor and students to facilitate a particular research venture as part of a team. Students develop proposals for individual or a team based projects. This class also facilitates group critiques.

    Participants will explore research methodologies and various forms of research as material, social, and symbolic creative practice. Lectures and workshops about technical, political, and practical aspects of research will support individual and group student work. The course design will be flexible depending on the topic areas of interest to individual students.

    Please contact the instructor with any questions and for more details.
    Open to graduate students and upper level undergraduates from both Architecture and Design and Fine Arts Divisions.
  • DM-7028

    SOUNDMARKS: SOUND DESIGN FOR VISUAL MEDIA

    Credits: 3.00

    This class will cover the fundamentals of digital audio composition, production, recording, arranging and sequencing, as well as the implementation of video, and reactive/interactive visualization. The class will consist of one semester-long project as well as a series of short-term assignments. Students will explore how to manipulate physical space with the creation of installation environments that will appeal to the viewer's entire sensory experience.
    Using digital studio tools like ProTools, Ableton Live and other audio programs as well as motion graphic software such as Final Cut and Flash, students will learn how to capture, manipulate, mix and optimize audio and visual material for final production.
    Analog and digital technologies will be explored tracing the use of sound and installation art as a sensory experience and connective instrument. We will review specific histories including the works of Maryanne Amacher, the Baschet Brothers, Alvin Lucier, Bruce Nauman, Hans Jenny, Phil Kline as well as other modern day practitioners.
    Elective; graduate level
    Open to senior, fifth-year, space permitting.
Wintersession 2014
  • DM-2104

    [ctrlC] + [ctrlV]

    Credits: 3.00

    This class focuses on appropriation, remixing, reuse and recontextualizing as artistic methods of inquiry and creative approaches that can be used to reformulate different forms of media and the preconceptions associated with them. We will examine examples of reproduction and appropriation in traditional art history and contemporary pop culture through readings and resulting class discussions. Students are expected to complete individual, weekly assignments based around various appropriation techniques, including digital technologies that take advantage of live manipulation of media on the internet (Twitter, Youtube, Tumblr, etc. using Processing in combination with Photoshop and other editing programs), as well as assignments based on the students' own interests and interpretations of class topics. Participation in these assignments as well as discussions and critiques is key. By the end of the course, we expect students to define their stance on appropriation within their own artworks and be critical when viewing it within the context of their daily lives.
    Open to Undergraduate and Graduate Students
  • DM-2105

    AESTHETIC JOURNALISM - WHERE ART, AESTHETICS & JOURNALISM MEET

    Credits: 3.00

    "The point is that art is not about delivering information, it is about questioning that information. Art does not replace the journalistic perspective with a new one, but extends the possibility of understanding the first - where journalism attempts to give answers, art strives to raise questions." Alfredo Cramerotti.
    Alfredo Cramerotti in his book Aesthetic Journalism: How to inform without informing critically examines the blurring of margins between artistic and information practices. This class will interrogate the points of convergence in journalism, art and aesthetics looking at them historically, ethically, conceptually and through practice. Camerotti offers a critique of investigative methods and aesthetic techniques encouraging us to contemplate our ideas of reality, objectivity and meaning-making. This book will serve as a guide and inspiration for the class. The contemplation that it encourages is relevant and necessary today, where both professionals and amateurs have the access and the tools to document, make-meaning and disseminate simultaneously and instantly.
    The class will be structured as a seminar/studio and will include guest lectures, technical workshops (camera, sound, editing, special effects), readings, film screenings and viewing of works of artists that operate in the space of aesthetic journalism. Students will collect and discuss examples of the points where journalism, art and aesthetics meet in order to build a vocabulary of this new cross discipline. In discussions and in practice students are expected to work within this space of convergence and find its boundaries, if there are any.
  • DM-2106

    CIRCUIT-PAPER-SCISSORS: PAPER-BASED ELECTRONIC ART AND DESIGN

    Credits: 3.00

    This course is an exploration on craftsmanship, through the lenses of an old technology - paper, and a new technology - digital circuitry. What will happen if we combine the former - the oldest, most simple and versatile medium in our history - with the later? This course is set out to discover the possibilities rooted in this intersection, while thinking about the roles of craftsmanship and technologies in the realm of digital, contemporary art and design.
    In the first part of the class, students will learn to make paper by hand out of bark fiber using the process of traditional Japanese papermaking. We will then experiment with different materials and processes that can creatively enrich the papermaking process. In the second part, students will be guided through the science and building of digital circuits. We will start from the basic components, such as LEDs and motors, then move to more advanced topics such as sensors and programmatic controls using the Arduino platform.
    This class is aimed to broaden students' perspective on digital art and design. Through experimentation and engagement with a variety of materials and concepts, both traditional and new, students will expand their vocabulary for application to personal creative practice moving forward.
    Open to Undergraduate and Graduate Students
  • DM-2109

    HARDWARE HACKING AND CRITICAL MAKING (OF OBJECT AND SOUND)

    Credits: 3.00

    This course supports students in learning to re-use and re-appropriate electronic materials and objects in works of art and design. It is a hands-on, studio production course related to the concepts of ubiquitous computing and interaction design, training students to re-use in an ethical, critical and considered way. Students will read, think, sketch, design, code, solder and build (but not always in that order) in order to produce physical objects that explore issues including, but not limited to, the habituation of technology over humans (and vice-versa) and operating and understanding existence in an over-mediated world, suggesting how we can address these issues through hacking, re-using and critical making. Students will develop a definition of hacking as re-using or appropriating used systems and rules and explore hacking in the context of musical creation and performance with exercises in circuit bending and making and altering ready-made electronic, musical instruments.
    All aspects of open source culture (including the Open Source Hardware Movement (http://www.oshwa.org), copyright law (writing and speeches by Lawrence Lessig), and hacking theory and criticism will be brought into discussion. Activities may include Junkyard Scrap Challenges (http://www.scrapyardchallenge.com) and field trips to Salvation Army stores as artists looking for useful, lively things and scraps to take apart, hack and build with. An introductory understanding of creative coding (particularly Processing) and Physical Computing (including the Arduino platform) will be taught. Artists will be studied, which will lend context to the students work, including Cory Arcangel, Douglas Repetto, Garnet Hertz, Daito Manabe, Kelly Heaton, Julie Andreyev, F.A.T. Lab, John Kessler, Tim Hawkinson, Survival Research Lab and the Institute for Applied Autonomy. Through study of these artists, coupled with the practice of critical making, students will learn to make systems (of control, of function, of repetition) visible and unstable by hacking and re-using.
    Open to Undergraduate and Graduate Students
  • DM-2107

    LIVING MEDIA: CULTIVATING AND SETTING It Loose in Your Work

    Credits: 3.00

    This studio course focuses on biology as a resource for creative practice. We will define a platform and set of methods through which to investigate how living organisms, systems, and related technologies can inspire, inform, and be the material for art and design. More specifically, we will investigate how biology can be hybridized with your practice and catalyze your work.
    We will cover the predominant approaches to utilizing living media in art and design and discuss related examples of practitioners and their work. In addition to an overview of historical precedents and shifts, we will primarily focus on examples of contemporary work.
    The course will include instruction and demos of living media, equipment, and techniques. Utilizing these resources and others from outside of class, students are supported in the creation of a series of projects that embody the covered methodologies and are relevant to their own practices.
    Open to Undergraduate and Graduate Students
  • DM-2108

    SHAPING THE FICTIONAL REALITY

    Credits: 3.00

    From Gargantua and Pantagruel, to Invisible Cities; Metropolis to Elysium, from the Upheaval in Eastern Europe, to the Arab Spring, people have been shaping both worlds (fictional and real) based on their imagination, demand, belief and ideology. Today, with the help of advanced media and technology, along with the overwhelming presence of social networks, the boundary between fiction and reality is breaking down. When you were sitting in your cozy room and watching a video of the riot in Cairo on YouTube, you might feel like you were watching another violence bootleg movie. The Internet delivers every incident in the world to us; in the meantime we can also make our "homebrew realities" by posting images and texts back to the web. People used to create fictions by mimicking the real world, but now we can see the real world starts to mimic human fiction.
    When we talk about "Fictional Reality", the most familiar forms would be literature, video/film, and video games. In this course, we will discover more innovative possibilities for visualizing/materializing the Fictional Realities created by students.
    In this course, we will discover how to fabricate the logical and "credible" realities by using artistic narratives and media techniques (analogue and/or digital) and how to transform those fictional realities into critical art projects. The main purpose of this process is to let students gain the experience of gathering and utilizing contents/resources from different directions/fields to make contemporary art. Throughout the course of study, students will learn the basic rules of creating a logical fictional environment, the techniques of making unique world-views and the methods of integrating various types of art (including painting/drawing, digital imaging/modeling, sculpture/installation, video, literature, music, game etc.) to visualize the fictional realities. We will read and/or rediscover some classic and unique works on fictional environments/worlds. In addition, we will discuss the philosophical theories and thoughts behind the nature of fictional narratives. Students will also have an opportunity to get familiar with practical tools such as Adobe Creative Suite, GarageBand, Ableton, Sketchup, and Max/MSP.
    The final project could be either physical or virtual. The use of Internet is welcomed but not obligatory. No prior video shooting/editing, coding and digital modeling experience needed.
    Open to Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Spring Semester 2014
  • DM-7102

    D+M GRADUATE STUDIO/SEMINAR 2

    Credits: 3.00

    This course supports the exploration of theoretical, social, material, technical and contextual research and concerns in new media arts practice during the first year of the first year of the D + M MFA program. It is a combined studio and seminar forum for Digital + Media first-year students. Participants become familiar with a vocabulary of multiple practices within digital media and, through a rigorous, hands-on approach, develop a thorough understanding of computational media as it applies to her/his individual creative practice. Students are introduced to a core set of methodologies and technologies from basic electronics and programming to interaction design to installation, and are encouraged to break comfort zones and practice through experimentation. Students conceptualize and discuss their studio-based work and their ongoing practice. Readings in critical cultural theory, media art theory, philosophy, semiotics and other areas further ground the conceptual approach of students in the Digital + Media department. The course is a mix of individual meetings, a required lecture and workshop series and group critiques. Some guest lecturers and visiting critics may also become involved with this class in terms of critical/research aspects. With a focus on studio experimentation and production, students will conceptualize and discuss their works-in-progress while beginning to work with new materials and systems in combination with a broad range media. Each student will practice articulating their ongoing studio art process and work, and will contribute to the dialogue concerning the research and work of their classmates.
    Graduate major requirement; Digital + Media majors only
    Registration by Digital + Media department, course not available via web registration
    Open to first-year graduate
  • DM-7198

    DIG MEDIA GRAD WRITTEN THESIS

    Credits: 3.00

    This seminar includes intensive group writing sessions. Individual meetings also will be conducted to support each student in assembling a comprehensive written thesis. Centrally our task together is to understand and evaluate actual studio work and to communicate this clearly and effectively within a comprehensive document. To accomplish this we will address: thesis rationale, development of concepts, source material, context relevant philosophical, aesthetic and theoretical issues as well as working process. Structure, layout, documentation, and the mechanics of formatting will also be explored in depth.
    Graduate major requirement; Digital + Media majors only
    Registration by Digital + Media department, course not available via web registration
    Open to second-year graduate
  • DM-7538

    DIGITAL + MEDIA THEORY

    Credits: 3.00

    As critical phenomenology, the aim of this course is to influence two acts, how to see and how to critique digital media, as extension of unresolved conceptual and aesthetic problems and as catapult for entirely original practice and possibility. The approach is the 'theoretical crit' that students write each week in response to readings, methods, problems, and works closely explored. As in contemporary art, new media's objects and theories are becoming increasingly interdependent. Thus, rather than using theory to evaluate artwork, we examine both work and theory, coming to contemporary, formal, critical, and instrumental voice through which to respond to assumptions and aspirations of each.
    Graduate major requirement; Digital + Media majors only
    Registration by Digital + Media department, course not available via web registration
    Open to first-year graduate students
  • DM-1524

    ECOCENTRIC PRACTICES

    Credits: 6.00


    Also offered as IDISC-1524 for undergraduate students
    Course Level: Graduate
  • DM-7009

    EXPERIMENTS IN OPTICS

    Credits: 3.00

    This class will serve as an interface between the new technologies of digital media, and the old technologies of optics. New digital technologies will be given alternative possibilities with the addition of specific projection apparatus (in terms of both projection optics and projection surfaces), plays with reflection (such as the construction of anamorphic cylinders, zoetropes, and other optical devices), and in the fabrication of project specific lenses. Given the hands-on nature of the glass department, the actual making and/or subversion of traditional optics is possible. The class will encourage collaborative work between students of varying experience levels and will foster the incorporation and dialogue between students of the two differing areas of expertise.
    Elective, Open to senior, fifth-year, graduate
    Also offered as GLASS 7009. Register in the course for which credit is desired
  • DM-2027

    FROM AVANT-GARDE TO YOUTUBE

    Credits: 3.00

    From the Avant-Garde to Youtube is a seminar and studio based class. The seminar is a survey of the moments in art history in which artists engage with a new time-based medium: the European Avant-Garde with cinema, Performance Art, Conceptual Art, and Fluxus with analog video and video installation, contemporary artists with digital video, global network distribution platforms, and video games.

    The seminar and the technical workshops (HD video shooting, lighting, video editing, multi-screen video installation, live video performance, and projection mapping) are designed to foster and create a shared language from which students can develop their personal time-base works within the course. Artist case studies include Dziga Vertov, Nam June Paik, Ryan Trecartin, anonymous-memes-creators, and drones, readings include Lev Kuleshov, Rosalind Krauss, Nicolas Bourriaud, Lev Manovich, and Hito Steyerl.
  • DM-4520

    INSTALLATION/SIGHT & SOUND

    Credits: 3.00

    Installation Sight & Sound is a studio course where students may create installations, performances, or site-specific works that incorporate screenprinting techniques as a primary medium. Students are encouraged to create experiences that transform the gallery setting or exist outside it. The course is open to students of every disciple and allows for cross-media experimentation. Print will be used and viewed as a drawing and sculptural tool that can be combined with your other technical/digital knowledge and experience. Students will be challenged to explore and invent new ways of utilizing Printmaking in their work, and will be encouraged to transform and reutilize space through interdisciplinary experimentation, and to begin to think about surfaces other than walls for the display of work. In the first half of the semester, students will conduct research, experiment with a variety of screenprinting techniques, offer short presentations of past work, and collaborate on midterm projects. In the second half of the semester, students will form final project proposals, and then work collaboratively or individually on a self-directed final.
    Major elective
    Also offered as PRINT-4520.
    Registration by Printmaking department; course is not available via web registration.
  • DM-2129

    NEXT GENERATION WEARABLES

    Credits: 3.00

    Electronic and computing technology in wearables are highly promising for future living conditions. With processing power and agile, adaptable, body-friendly materials, the development rate of wearable technologies is accelerating rapidly and our vision is becoming reality. In this class, students will investigate technologies in wearable applications for the future. Students will choose to develop their concepts for either mass-production or special customization, examining physical, psycho-social, or other needs for augmentation or extension. The goal of the course is to enhance students' design processes in research and exploration and in strategic forecasting for product development or future conditions, broadly construed.

    Students will search for user needs: Contexts of use and desired interactions (tactile, optic, acoustic) between a wearable and its surrounding environment. Students should consider developing ideas for ubiquitous computing and relevant industries including health, communication, aging, extreme environments, and more. Students will explore concepts and form dialogue through hands-on experimentation with digital components (sensors, actuators, arduino) and material fabrication (textiles/cardboards/wires/cords). For the final project, students will complete working prototypes by embedding material substrates and/or using software (Rhino/SW) and haptic tools to build 3D-prints that contain components. Students will also create and visualize scenarios of user interaction and holistic experience.

    Estimated Cost of Materials: Approximately $100
    Digital + Media majors only.
    Also offered as ID 20ST-04 for ID majors only.
  • DM-2130

    PROJECTS IN CREATIVE PROGRAMMING

    Credits: 3.00

    This course is a graduate-level hands-on creative-programming studio, supporting conceptual and technical research and development as students build ambitious projects of their own design. This course is ideal for students working on projects with elements involving code and needing a shared research dialogue and space within which to work, ask questions, seek guidance and exchange ideas. The course will consist of a combination of individual meetings, group critiques, and focused topic-and-tool-specific workshops. Access to a full array of languages will be supported. Workshops will focus on more refined technical strategies regarding organizing, sharing and working with large quantities of code, as well as additional topics specific to students' needs. The course will also encourage students to articulate the conceptual and material contexts of their work and to address the considerations of launching projects in social, online, hybrid and physical spaces of engagement.

    Some previous experience in computer programming is required.
    Open to Graduate students and Seniors/Fifth-years in all majors.
  • DM-7152

    RESEARCH PROJECT

    Credits: 3.00

    This class takes the form of a series of group meetings to explore work related to student selected research projects. Each student may work on his/her own project, or work with the instructor and students to facilitate a particular research venture as part of a team. Students develop proposals for individual or a team based projects. This class also facilitates group critiques.

    Participants will explore research methodologies and various forms of research as material, social, and symbolic creative practice. Lectures and workshops about technical, political, and practical aspects of research will support individual and group student work. The course design will be flexible depending on the topic areas of interest to individual students.

    Please contact the instructor with any questions and for more details.
    Open to graduate students and upper level undergraduates from both Architecture and Design and Fine Arts Divisions.
  • DM-7199

    THESIS PROJECT

    Credits: 6.00

    This course supports the practical, conceptual, theoretical and historical development of the M.F.A. thesis (exhibition and written document). Students are required to work independently and in individual consultation with their thesis committee to develop and finalize the thesis exhibition and written document for presentation at the end of the year. The exhibition and written thesis should articulate one's personal studio art / design practice in an historically and theoretically informed context. Formal group critiques are required at the midterm and end of the semester. A major final critique with visiting critics is held in the context of the final MFA Exhibition. The accompanying written thesis is expected to be of publishable quality and is also placed within the public sphere through electronic publication and filing with the RISD Library.

    Final submissions for this course include the presentation of a final exhibition, submission of the final written thesis, and timely completion of work for preliminary deadlines throughout the semester (draft theses, exhibition plans and press materials). Please see Digital + Media Thesis Timeline for a clear sequence of required deadlines. Please refer to the Digital + Media Thesis Guidelines and Policies for clarification of the goals and expectations of the RISD D+M MFA.
    Graduate major requirement; Digital + Media majors only
    Registration by Digital + Media department, course not available via web registration
    Open to second-year graduate
    This class is 6 credits in the Spring, enrolled with the Thesis Chair.
  • DM-7035

    VIRTUAL FORM: EXPERIMENTS IN 3D MODELING

    Credits: 3.00

    This class explores the impact of computer based 3d modeling, with special attention to the history of illusionistic representation on the one hand, and generative and algorithmic approaches to form on the other.
    How have special effects, video games, architectural renderings, or simulations such as Google Earth changed the way we engage space, or are they simply a continuation of perspectival illusions created in the Renaissance? How can artists and designers use or hack these digital mediums in their own work? How do algorithmic approaches to form differ from mimetic or illusionistic approaches to form?
    The course will look at various 3d modeling techniques as well as different methods of outputting or presenting 3D models, including rendering images, creating animations, or using fabrication techniques such as lasercutters and rp machines to produce physical models. The main goal of the course is to help students develop a working methodology for integrating 3d modeling into their own practice. The course will not focus on any single software, but will examine a wide range of media and computer software that can be used or hacked by students, from Google Earth, to video game engines, and from xtranormal.com to Maya and 3ds Max, from simple tools to scripting and programming 3d form. The course is open to both beginners and students with experience in 3D modeling
    Elective; graduate level
    Open to senior, fifth-year, space permitting.
Digital + Media Foreground Image 4
Laura Swanson, 2011 Digital + Media, TOGETHER together