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ISUS + RISD Address Global Water Issues

Elizabeth Dean Hermann’s current concern is water.

Ono Named First Gardner Fellow

Takuma Ono, a critic in RISD’s Landscape Architecture department, has been named the inaugural Maeder-York Family Fellow in Landscape Studies at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston.

Sustainable “Shelter” for Indian Women

Can design change the lives of dozens of Indian sex workers and their children, breaking the cycle of dependency and despair? Alumni Colleen Clines MLA 10 and Devon Miller MLA 10, co-founders of a nonprofit called Anchal, believe it can.

Conflict Hits Home in Syria

Syrian-American activist Lina Sergie Attar MArch 01 spoke at RISD on Tuesday, May 6, imploring students not to ignore the devastation taking place in her home country.

Exploring Subterranean Rome

The course description for RISD in Rome – a month-long, three-credit Continuing Ed course offered for the first time this summer – invites students to “journey into subterranean spaces and embrace archeological inquiry.

Natural Alliance

Students in an Ecological Planning & Design studio taught by landscape architect Nick Pouder are proud to say that their work is helping the state of Connecticut in its quest to preserve 21% of its land area as open space for public recreation and natural resource conservation.

Sustainable Solutions for Sri Lanka

“At RISD I’m surrounded by creative, highly intelligent people who can begin to solve some of the world’s intractable problems if they’re given the opportunity to collaborate and innovate,” said Professor of Landscape Architecture Elizabeth Dean Hermann shortly after returning from her Wintersession studio on an island in the Indian Ocean.

Eco-friendly Construction in Costa Rica

Coated in a layer of dust and sweat, Dakota Linkel 15 IA struggles to fit a square piece of metal mesh into the large window opening of a schoolhouse in the tropics.

Revitalizing Riverside Park

How do cities revitalize historic post-industrial sites deteriorating from age and harboring a reputation for pollution? Assuming they can reverse the affects of centuries-old environmental damage, how do they get the public to use these spaces again?.