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Fall 2019

  1. Collaborative Study

    A Collaborative Study Project (CSP) allows two students to work collaboratively to complete a faculty supervised project of independent study.

    Usually, a CSP is supervised by two faculty members, but with approval it may be supervised by one faculty member. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses, though it is not a substitute for a course if that course is regularly offered.

    Permission of Instructor required

  2. Collegiate Teaching: Preparation + Reflection

    How can we add to the future enrichment of our disciplines? How do we make future collegiate teaching a more meaningful practice? This semester-long professional practice course is designed for artists, designers, architects, and educators who are considering teaching in higher education after graduation and/or those who will be teaching during Wintersession as they complete their course of study at RISD. The goal is to introduce graduate students to a reflective teaching foundation and to provide an orientation to the collegiate teaching and learning experience.

    The first half of the course is composed of readings and discussions related to seven teaching portfolio assignments. The second half of the course entails Individual Teaching Practice Sessions in which students prepare a class that is observed, videotaped, and receives detailed feedback from faculty and peer observers. Major outcomes of the course are: a partial teaching portfolio including a teaching and inclusivity philosophy, course proposals and an extensive course syllabus.

    This is the first course in the required sequence for the Certificate of Collegiate Teaching in Art + Design.

    Graduate elective

    Partial requirement for both Certificates in Collegiate Teaching in Art + Design.

  3. Context, Content, and Practices In Art & Design Education

    This course examines the development of visual arts education in its connection to general education. At each stage of the investigation, issues are examined in terms of the relationship between, context, content, and pedagogical practice. There is a particular emphasis in this course on exploring the manner in which belief systems shape curriculum construction within elementary and secondary schools. Major topics of investigation include: varying curricular shifts in visual arts education, standards and accountability, the diverse classroom, political mandates, public school re-design, and the role of unions and professional associations.

    Major requirement for MAT, MA elective; MAT & MA only

  4. Critical Investigations In Arts Learning

    This seminar provides an opportunity to critically examine topics and issues within various arts learning contexts. The course is designed to provide students with a primer to practices and scholarship of the intersections between the arts and education. The course is grounded in types of learning that occur in a range of institutional and organizational settings that include schools, colleges and universities, museums as well as non-profit sector community-based organizations. The seminar explores the role of art and design in individuals' lives from the perspective of the past and present as well as contemporary shifts that suggest a re-examination of focus and pedagogical approach.

    The course draws extensively from key documents from the arts learning literature as well as the expertise of scholars and practitioners who will join the course throughout the semester to share with students perspectives that illustrate both common ground and a diversity of thinking surrounding some of the more pressing topics and problems within the guests' respective professional fields.

    Throughout the course, students are required to provide annotations of journal articles, present reaction papers, make presentations on designated topics, and at completion of the course present a proposal for a potential thesis monograph essay or thesis book.

    Major requirement for MA; MA only.

  5. Curriculum Development For Elementary Visual Arts Learning

    This course with its focus on curriculum development and pedagogical practices for students in elementary school has been designed as a the companion to TLAD-612G where the focus is students in secondary school. In this way, this pair of courses provides graduate students with an essential foundation to teaching the visual arts (art and design) from pre-K to 12th grade.

    This course provides students with insights and experiences in studio-based teaching and learning through the lens of an elementary setting. Students will be introduced to curricular and pedagogical practices that are grounded in meaning making and artistic inquiry, as well as authentic forms of assessment. There is a special emphasis within this course on approaching each of these frameworks (curriculum, instruction, and assessment) through an understanding of the developmental needs - cognitive, social, and personal - of young children.

    Within this course, students will engage in curriculum design and lesson planning through the development of a series of units that are grounded in enduring ideas in art and design education. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to engage in micro teaching experiences in partnership with a local elementary school classroom. They will have the opportunity to teach a carefully designed art/design lesson to a group of elementary-aged children and have the chance to thoughtfully reflect on their own teaching practices and encounters in the classroom.

    Major requirement for MAT, MA elective; MAT & MA students only.

  6. Curriculum Development For Secondary Visual Arts Learning

    This course with its focus on curriculum development and pedagogical practices for students in grades 7-12 has been designed as the companion to TLAD-611G, where the focus is students in grades PK-6. In this manner, this pair of courses provides graduate students with an essential foundation to teaching the Visual Arts (art and design) from pre-K to 12th grade.

    This course explores the development of a conceptual framework for studio-based teaching and learning for students in grades 7-12 that aligns with the National Visual Arts Standards (NVAS). The course is guided by the belief all middle and high school students have creative capacity and that visual arts education plays an extraordinarily important role in its development. Further, the course places emphasis on instructional design that encourages curiosity, discovery, creativity and importantly personal point of view. Throughout the course, there is a focus on curriculum development and pedagogical strategies crafted to meet the cognitive and social development of learners as well as the personal interests of students while simultaneously introducing the work of a diverse range artists from historic to contemporary as models of practice.

    The course introduces an approach to pedagogy for art and design education that is informed by the graduate student's personal artistic practice combined with their understanding of the rich diversity of human visual expression. The course places special emphasis on the development of studio-based learning that centers on the intersecting domains of making and responding. In this way, curriculum and instruction is designed to deepen secondary students' (7-12) understanding of art and design as expression of enduring ideas. Graduate students examine these concepts through their own studio practice, critical readings, the development curriculum maps and lesson plans and through an integrated practicum experience that provides an authentic opportunity to implement instruction with high school students in the TLAD-Studio Lab.

    Major requirement for MAT, MA elecitve; MAT & MA only.

  7. Design Education Workshop II: Place - Product - System

    The place, product and systems design problems and exercises in this fall studio-based workshop build on the documentation design tools developed during the summer design course TLAD-654G Design Education Workshop I. The sequence of courses have been developed in tandem specifically to expand the repertoire of K-12 educators' curriculum toolkits to include design. Further, this course provides educators with an invaluable foundation with which to engage in STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math) teaching. This course, with an emphasis on place, product and system, introduces design principles as tools for creative problem solving and making as related to the physical world we inhabit. In this course, students experiment with materials, work at the scale of the body, with spaces of enclosure and gathering, and with complex built and natural environmental systems. The goal is to work as a designer, using design principles and methodologies as a way to explore the world in which we live and to experiment with materials in ways that address everyday problems. In working through the course design problems, students are introduced to design tools and materials for observation, iteration, prototyping and documenting user experience to solve design problems. Throughout the course, students adapt newly introduced design methods to curriculum proposals for design teaching and learning elementary and secondary school settings. The combined set of design toolkits developed through the summer and fall design education studio workshops will assist educators form the foundation for a design pedagogy to be carried forward into their K-12 art and design teaching.

    Major requirement for MAT

    Open to non-major graduate students by permission of Instructor

  8. Drawing Objectives: Marking and Making

    Drawing has been called the distillation of an idea. Drawing sensibilities pervade all visual media, yet drawing can be independent of all other media. How can we make our drawing ventures resonant or challenging? Through independent studio production and focused critique, the course provides graduate students from any major the opportunity to more deeply understand the nature of drawing through a series of self-directed and self-paced experiences and investigations. Coursework may be referenced or supported by historical and contemporary contexts. Digital works, a single drawing medium or tool, phenomenal means, or other materials or mixtures of instruments can be used for mark-making. A full spectrum of drawing ways and ideas can be explored. The class is structured around cross-major conversations in small group critiques, peer-exchange critiques, larger group reviews and individual analysis. Drawings from this course may integrate or extend other areas of graduate students' study, including thesis content and personal visual inquiries.

    MA elective

    Open to non-major graduate students as an elective.

  9. ISP Major

    The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses.

    Permission of Instructor and GPA of 3.0 or higher is required.

    Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; the course is not available via web registration.

  10. Lifespan: Exceptionality

    This course is designed to provide an overview of the educational psychological and social needs of learners with disabilities, to discuss the impact of special education law on public school programs, and to provide a background for designing appropriate interventions for students with a variety of special learning needs in the art and design classroom. The course will focus on the identification of various disabilities, their characteristics, and the legal and philosophical basis for interventions and adaptations needed in the art and design classroom.

    Major requirement for MAT, MA elective; MAT & MA only

  11. Mapping Visual Arts Learning

    This course explores the development of a conceptual framework for studio-based teaching and learning for children and adolescents. The course introduces an approach to pedagogy for art and design that is informed by artistic practice and which revolves around meaning-making. Students examine the principles of curriculum mapping and instructional design through the development of a series of units of instruction based respectively on themes, subjects, and media - all of which are crafted to meet the cognitive, social, and personal interests of children and youth. The course explores the relationship between curriculum, instruction, and assessment and where curriculum and instruction is focused on deepening K-12 students' understandings of art and design as expressions of enduring ideas. In explorations of assessment, students consider and design various formative and summative strategies to capture and evaluate levels of student understanding. Throughout this course, there is an emphasis on the development of curriculum design and instructional strategies for elementary and secondary students that encourage discovery, creativity, innovation, personal voice, and even play!

    Major requirement for MA; MA only.

  12. Professional Internship

    This course provides MA students with the unique opportunity to complete a professional practice internship in a real world setting. The internship has a number of purposes but is particularly designed to expand the candidate's experience of arts-related programming in one of a number of venues including but not limited to: community arts centers, alternative arts spaces, foundations, museums, schools, hospitals, arts agencies, etc. An internship site is made in consultation with TLAD's Department Head who is in a particularly strong position to advise and recommend potential local and regional sites that might be an appropriate fit for a candidate. MA candidates are also encouraged to identify potential internship sites and the Department is very willing to make an institutional advance to an individual or organization in order to facilitate and establish an internship agreement. It is important for candidates to recognize that while they might wish to have a very particular internship, the ultimate placement is very much dependent upon the readiness of a particular site to accept an intern.

    Major elective for MA; MA only.

Wintersession 2020

  1. Artist & Designer As Teacher: School, Museum, Community

    This course provides students from any major with the opportunity to explore issues in art and design teaching. As a broad overview, this course will address formal and informal art teaching in K-12 school-based settings, as well as in art museums, and community-based settings. Students will be introduced to ideas about teaching and learning art through a wide variety of experiences, such as observations in diverse art education settings, guest speakers, as well as opportunities interacting with (and teaching!) children and/or adolescents. This course will include seminar sessions, as well as site visits to local schools, museums, and community-based organizations. The content and experiences offered during this class hope to inspire and excite students about the possibilities of utilizing their studio practice as art & design teachers or teaching artists in museum or community-based settings. The course will have particular value to students perhaps considering continuing their studies at RISD beyond undergrad to pursue either a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) or Master of Arts (MA) in Art + Design Education.

    This course is designed to introduce students to contemporary issues and practices in art education through a variety of spaces. The course content will be divided approximately into three distinct explorations: art and design teaching at the K-12 schools, art museum education, and community-based art teaching. During each exploration, students will be asked to reflect on their own personal experiences with art learning, as well as engage with readings that explore contemporary perspectives on art education. Additionally, each exploration will be enhanced with opportunities for students to experience authentic art education spaces (either digitally or in person) to see how theory can connect with practice. The course culminates in a capstone experience in which students, collaborating in small groups, will lead a short studio-based experience for children or adolescents. This experience will be conducted in partnership with a local education organization such as a school, community arts center or RISD's Project Open Door. Throughout this class, students will be offered a variety of opportunities to connect art education theory and practice, as well as reflect on their own experiences with art learning and teaching.

Spring 2020

  1. Arts In Context

    Exploring art and design within the context of the non-profit sector is the goal of the seminar. We will examine the roles and responsibilities of non-profit arts organizations from both a practical and ideological perspective to relate them to one's own artistic or design practice or professional aspirations. The course will visit regional arts non-profits, examining their life cycles and the factors that shape an agency's success and/or failure. Organizations investigated may include: arts councils, service organizations, arts centers, alternative spaces, residency programs, community-based initiatives, foundations, and galleries. A deepening understanding of non-profits arts management including mission and vision, leadership, sustainability, relationships to the community and the public will occur. We will ask whom do they serve, what is their relevancy, and what qualitative results do they achieve? The off-campus visits and on-campus guests will serve as core information to researching and proposing a start-up non-profit, analyzing non-profits, or developing successful residency applications. This course will be of special interest to studio practitioners and educators whose professional lives are likely to intersect with arts organizations and agencies in the future.

    MA elective

    Open to non-major graduate students as an elective.

  2. Collegiate Studio: Discipline Centered Learning

    Using RISD as a site for the exploration of strategies for studio-based teaching and learning is the goal of the course. The class will draw upon the varying expertise and pedagogical practices of RISD faculty and guests from various disciplines to provide graduate students with examples of teaching that can inform their development as future faculty. It is designed for students who are interested in models of practice in an array of academic environments. The course examines teaching methodologies in graduates' respected fields through case studies, faculty interviews, curriculum comparisons and article reviews.

    Learning to teach in a generative and attentive manner can bring teaching closer to one's studio practice. By enriching a partial teaching portfolio with a cover letter, an academic CV, and an artist/designer statement with images, a full professional and teaching portfolio will be completed.

    >This is the second course in the required sequence for the Certificate in Collegiate Teaching in Art + Design, and is only offered to those graduates who are not teaching or co-teaching during Wintersession.

    Graduate elective

    Partial requirement for Certificate in Collegiate Teaching in Art + Design.

  3. Colloquium In Contemporary Practices In Arts Learning

    The most compelling arguments in support of the value of the arts in education and the case for arts as an agent of transformation in the lives of children and youth become most evident through the analysis of high-quality contemporary practices in arts pedagogy situated in a range of settings both in and out of schools. This seminar, in addition to students' personal case study investigations, utilizes conversations with visiting arts administrators, artists, curators, educators, and scholars as lenses to inform the analysis and discussion of models of practice that result in meaningful experience that inspire in children and youth creative thinking, making, and innovation. Key products from the course include response papers, a case study report and final presentation.

    Major requirement for MA

    Open to non-major graduate students as elective pending seat availability and permission of Instructor.

  4. Degree Project

    The Degree Project is the capstone event of an MAT student's program in which the MAT presents comprehensive documentation of their coursework and teaching to a review committee consisting of RISD faculty, clinical educators, and external critics. The work presented includes the following required components: Online Program Portfolio, Teaching Portfolio, and an Interpretive Exhibit. The Degree Project is reviewed and evaluated in the context of the assessment framework of the Rhode Island Professional Teaching Standards (RIPTS).

    Major requirement for MAT; MAT only

  5. Drawing Objectives: Marking and Making

    Drawing has been called the distillation of an idea. Drawing sensibilities pervade all visual media, yet drawing can be independent of all other media. How can we make our drawing ventures resonant or challenging? Through independent studio production and focused critique, the course provides graduate students from any major the opportunity to more deeply understand the nature of drawing through a series of self-directed and self-paced experiences and investigations. Coursework may be referenced or supported by historical and contemporary contexts. Digital works, a single drawing medium or tool, phenomenal means, or other materials or mixtures of instruments can be used for mark-making. A full spectrum of drawing ways and ideas can be explored. The class is structured around cross-major conversations in small group critiques, peer-exchange critiques, larger group reviews and individual analysis. Drawings from this course may integrate or extend other areas of graduate students' study, including thesis content and personal visual inquiries.

    MA elective

    Open to non-major graduate students as an elective.

  6. Student Teaching In Elementary School

    A field-based student teaching (clinical teaching) experience at the elementary level in a public school in Rhode Island or Massachusetts, supervised by school-based clinical educators and faculty from RISD's Department of Teaching + Learning in Art + Design. A student teacher's performance during this six-week teaching assignment is assessed using the performance benchmarks of the Rhode Island Professional Teaching Standards (RIPTS).

    Major requirement for MAT; MAT only

  7. Student Teaching In Secondary School

    A field-based student teaching (clinical teaching) experience at the secondary level in a public school in Rhode Island or Massachusetts supervised by school-based clinical educators and faculty from RISD's Department of Teaching + Learning in Art + Design. A student teacher's performance during this six-week teaching assignment is assessed using the performance benchmarks of the Rhode Island Beginning Professional Teaching Standards (RIPTS).

    Major requirement for MAT; MAT only

  8. Thesis Research

    The Department of Teaching + Learning in Art + Design requires MA candidates submit a capstone thesis in partial fulfillment of degree requirements. Candidates are given a degree of flexibility in determining the format for this work, but typically it takes the form of either a thesis monograph essay or a thesis book. The thesis monograph essay provides candidates with the opportunity to focus on a deep investigation of a single subject framed within the context of learning and through art and design. An essential characteristic of this approach to the thesis is in how it provides evidence of the candidate's ability to move beyond description to analysis and how they are able to place the subject of investigation within the realm of scholarship. The thesis book provides a candidate with the opportunity to make sense of their journey through their program in a more autobiographical and documentary manner. The thesis book format affords candidates the opportunity to explore how form can be exploited to visualize research. Whether presented as a thesis monograph essay or thesis book, this capstone requirement provides MA candidates with a formal opportunity to make public their understanding about a specific aspect of the nature of arts learning gained through their coursework, excursions into the scholarly literature and fieldwork experiences. The purpose here, therefore, is to conceive of the thesis not merely as an academic exercise but also contributing to program development as well as providing a reservoir of understandings that will inform the candidate's future professional practice as an educator.

    Major requirement for MA; MA only