Academics

Printmaking

Student inspecting a print

Printmaking at RISD supports the creative development of artists dedicated to visual exploration and expression using intaglio, lithography, screenprint, relief and related photo-processes. Both undergraduate and graduate majors explore a focused personal direction through the mastery of traditional and contemporary techniques, including digital and alternative print methods.

Degree programs

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA)

The BFA in Printmaking offers you the knowledge and skills to create work through a variety of processes, including intaglio, lithography and silkscreen, and to explore printmaking as a vibrant area of studio practice.

Master of Fine Arts (MFA)

Integrating new artistic and technical methods with the medium’s historical traditions, the Printmaking MFA program encourages you to hone your approach to practice through the making of printed multiples.

In the studio

Printmaking majors work in Benson Hall, a well-equipped facility with state-of-the-art equipment and separate floors allocated to lithography, intaglio and screenprint studios. Visits to the RISD Museum along with off-campus museums, galleries and symposia underscore the rich historical context of contemporary printmaking.

Featured stories

A Shape-Shifting Woman Plays All the Parts

The New York Times speaks with Martine Gutierrez about ANTI-ICON, a Public Art Fund project appearing on bus shelters and billboards in several cities.

Julie Mehretu’s Reckoning with Success

The New York Times profiles alumna Julie Mehretu MFA 97 PT/PR, whose work will be on display at the Whitney Museum from March 25–August 8.

Transgressing the Feminized

Grad students Breslin Bell MFA 21 PR and Mariana Ramos Ortiz MFA 21 PR co-curate a multidisciplinary exhibition exploring intersections of gender, race and class.

Student work

Abstract print of brown blobs

After RISD, Printmaking majors go in many different directions, often pursuing interests they’ve defined through multidisciplinary exploration as students. Many alumni go on to become practicing fine artists who exhibit their work all over the world. Others run galleries, curate shows, write art criticism, teach, launch small startups and make an impact on the contemporary art world in a wide variety of other ways.

Alumni at work

Huma Bhabha BFA 85 | fine artist

Through sculpture and works on paper, Pakistani-born artist Huma Bhabha creates highly figurative work that addresses such related themes as memory, place, war and displacement. Based in Poughkeepsie, NY, she exhibits widely throughout the US and Europe and her work is included in the permanent collections of MoMA, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Whitney, among several other venues. Incorporating a diverse range of found materials in her sculptural figures, Bhabha has received wide acclaim for recalling primitive and classical aesthetics in work that is urgent and unmistakably contemporary.

Jane Kim BFA 03 | environmental artist

Mural artist Jane Kim majored in Printmaking at RISD and says her education shaped how she works as an artist. In addition to honing technical art skills, she learned to ask herself why she makes what she does. After graduation, Kim pursued her love of nature by enrolling in the Science Illustration Program at California State University at Monterey Bay. She is the cofounder of Ink Dwell, a studio that, in combining elements of contemporary art and classic scientific illustration, explores the contours of the natural world.

Julie Mehretu MFA 97 | painter

Internationally recognized painter and MacArthur Award winner Julie Mehretu is known to have concurrent solo exhibitions on opposite sides of the Atlantic. The Marian Goodman Gallery in New York and White Cube in London both showcase her large-scale abstract paintings inspired by the Arab Spring and other political uprisings around the world. In the Ethiopian-born painter’s own words, her work explores “the multifaceted layers of place, space and time that impact the formation of personal and communal identity” in an attempt to make sense of world.

Closeup of a woodblock being cleaned