Academics Printmaking

Bachelor’s Program

BFA | 4-year program

Intensive study of conceptual, formal and practical issues related to historical and contemporary prints in the RISD Museum of Art and other collections in the region provides inspiration through direct contact with original works of art. Critical insights from faculty, visiting artists and other print-world professionals help students to develop mature personal work responsive to the issues defining the field today.

Learning outcomes

Graduates are prepared to:

  • develop the self-reflective capacity to explain why they are making prints.
  • be conversant with the history of the printmaking field.
  • articulate the conceptual grounding of their work and defend it through critical dialogue.
  • demonstrate knowledge and technical skills in varied printmaking contexts, from intaglio, lithography and silkscreen to related disciplines such as illustration, textiles and photography.

Inspiring community

Approximately 35 undergraduates and 15 graduate students work alongside one another in the department's dedicated facilities in Benson Hall. Students at all levels—both within and outside the—inspire each other through provocative individual inquiry and exploration. In addition, Printmaking majors are very curious, open and willing to help each other in any way they can.

Learning environment

In addition to having access to state-of-the-art facilities in Benson Hall, Printmaking majors regularly take advantage of RISD resources that are especially helpful for research and personal growth. Just across the street, in the RISD Museum of Art's Minskoff Center for Prints, Drawings and Photographs, students have access to a collection of 26,000 works on paper from the 15th century to the present. Direct study of these works offers invaluable insights and inspiration, as does hands-on access to specimens in the Nature Lab and in the Fleet Library's extraordinary collection of artists' books.

Undergraduate student work

Curriculum

After completing RISD's required first-year Foundation Studies program, sophomores who choose this major are introduced to the basic forms of printmaking—intaglio, lithography and silkscreen. Juniors continue to hone their conceptual, critical and technical skills through a number of Printmaking electives or studios in related disciplines such as Illustration, Textiles and Photography.

FOUNDATION YEAR

FALL
Drawing I
Design I
Spatial Dynamics I
First-year Literature Seminar
Theory and History of Art and Design I: Global Modernisms
Wintersession
Non-major studio elective
Spring
Drawing II
Design II
Spatial Dynamics II
Topics in History, Philosophy and the Social Sciences
Theory and History of Art and Design II: Premodern Worlds

SOPHOMORE

FALL
Intaglio I
Relief Projects I
Printmaking or other studio elective
Liberal Arts electives
Waterbase Silkscreen I
WINTERSESSION
Non-major studio elective
SPRING
Lithography I
Printmaking or other studio elective
Liberal Arts electives

JUNIOR

FALL
Workshop: Light to Ink
Junior Printmaking Workshop: Seminar/Critique
Printmaking or other studio elective
Liberal Arts electives
WINTERSESSION
Non-major studio elective
SPRING
Junior Printmaking Workshop: Seminar/Critique
Printmaking or other studio elective
Liberal Arts electives

SENIOR

FALL
Senior Printmaking Workshop: Critique
Senior Printmaking Workshop: Seminar
Printmaking or other studio elective
Liberal Arts elective
WINTERSESSION
Non-major studio elective
SPRING
Senior Printmaking Degree Project: Critique
Printmaking or other studio elective
Liberal Arts elective

Degree project

In the third year of the program, seniors work more independently, refining a personal visual vocabulary through a final degree project—a body of work that demonstrates each individual's technical strengths, along with his/her conceptual clarity and depth.

Application requirements

  1. You’ll begin and manage your RISD application process by completing the Common Application. There is a non-refundable application fee of $60 to use this service, plus a nonrefundable $10 fee to submit a required online portfolio via SlideRoom.

    Don’t let the admission application fee prevent you from applying! If the fee presents a hardship for you or your family, we’ll waive it for you. You can request a waiver two ways: 1. Navigate to the "Fee Waiver" portion on the Common App and check off the answer which most fits your family circumstances and you'll be able to submit your application without entering your credit card information. 2: If your situation does not match any of the waiver criteria on the Common App fee waiver section, email admissions@risd.edu and we’ll process the waiver manually. To receive a SlideRoom fee waiver, please email admissions@risd.edu.

  2. Applicants must provide official transcripts of all secondary academic work through the most recent grading period. Your counselor may submit your transcript through the Common Application, Parchment, email or mail. If your academic credentials are not written in English, they must be translated into English by an approved translator prior to submission.

  3. Test-Optional, SAT and ACT

    Beginning with students applying for entrance in 2021, RISD is offering all applicants the ability to be reviewed without submitting results from the SAT or ACT. Students may opt into this process by selecting this option within the RISD section of the Common Application. For students who choose to submit test scores, RISD will superscore your results, looking at your highest outcome across multiple test dates.

    RISD’s institution code number for the SAT is 3726; for ACT the code number is 003812.

    Transfer credits

    Some A-Level classes and IB credits can be used toward RISD liberal arts requirements. First-year students can transfer a maximum of nine credits from A-Level classes with an earned grade of C or higher or Higher Level IB grades of 5, 6, or 7. RISD will not accept IB credit from art or studio classes. View RISD's full transfer credit policy

    English language proficiency tests

    All applicants who speak English as a second language, including US citizens, must submit results from any one of these three options: TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language), IELTS (International English Language Testing System) or Duolingo (an online English test). Since proficiency in English is a prerequisite for acceptance, applicants must attain an acceptable score on their chosen test; RISD requires a minimum result of 93 on the TOEFL or a 6.5 on the IELTS.

    Duolingo is changing its scoring system beginning with tests completed on July 15, 2019 and beyond. If you took this test prior to the change, we require a minimum result of 63. Applicants who completed the Duolingo test on or after July 15, 2019 must achieve a minimum score of 115, which is the equivalent of 63 in their prior scoring system.

    Plan to take the TOEFL or IELTS well in advance of the application deadline since it may take three weeks for your scores to be sent to RISD by the test agency. Duolingo test results may take up to four days to be received by RISD.

    The language test requirement may be waived for applicants who have studied in an institution where English is the language of instruction. You must contact the Admissions Office to explain your school history and determine if you are eligible.

  4. Your portfolio should present 12–20 examples of your most recent work that showcases your thinking and making. You will upload your portfolio in SlideRoom through the Common Application, where you will begin the application process.

    Your selected work should reflect a full range of your ideas, curiosity, experimentation and experience in creating and making. This can include work in any medium, in finished or sketch form, and can be the result of an assigned project or a self-directed exploration.

    We strongly recommend that you include some examples that involve drawing from direct observation (rather than from imagination or a photograph). Drawing is a fundamental tool for visual makers from initial concept to execution, so it is valuable for reviewers to see examples of your experience with and approach to drawing.

    While the majority of your portfolio should feature finished pieces, we suggest including some research or preparatory work in up to three—but no more than three—portfolio selections. This helps reviewers better understand how you develop your ideas.

    Finally, we strongly discourage including excessive visual elements and text descriptions in a single slide submission. These are difficult to view and are likely to exceed the allowed file limit. Additional angles or detail shots of some works can either be submitted as an individual image or video upload, or you can upload a composite including up to three images. Editing is an important part of curating your portfolio. You may need to devise creative solutions to best show your work within the limits of submission guidelines.

    Our recommended file formats are: jpeg, png, gif, mp4 and mov. These formats are most compatible with SlideRoom. Google Drive or zipped files are not recommended formats for sharing your artwork.

  5. Part I: Visual Response

    Identify something that is in need of repair. Use any material or approach to fix it.

    What you choose to fix can be anything: from a tangible object to an intangible system. You can choose something objectively broken, or something you personally believe is in need of repair. This could be a past art piece, a social or ecological issue, a historical era, technology, etc.

    Your process is entirely up to you, but your fix should involve intentional modifications that change the original state for the better. It can exist in the realm of aesthetics, function, structure, or in any other capacity.

    Visual responses will vary by applicant so how you document your assignment will depend on your repair. This could be photo documentation of your response, a digital outcome, or a short video. Our recommended file formats are: jpeg, png, gif, mp4 and mov. These formats are most compatible with SlideRoom. Google Drive, zipped files, and multiple page PDFs are not recommended formats for sharing your artwork.

    Part 2: Written Statement (250 word limit)

    Submit a written statement in a single page PDF that provides insight into the creative process you used in your visual response. Your written statement could speak to any of the following:

    • How you identified something in need of repair
      For applicants choosing a tangible object to repair, we recommend including a single image/recording of the original object in your written statement file. It’s helpful for reviewers to have a point of reference when viewing your ‘fix.’
    • Your considerations toward problem solving
    • Material choices

    For more info, check out our info session about the new Assignment.

  6. Submit your college essay, up to 650 words. You will find the writing prompts in the Personal Essay section of the Common Application.

    While we encourage you to adhere to the rules of good writing, we look for applicants who are not afraid to take risks in their expression. Please don't hesitate to use a writing style or method that may be outside the mainstream as you express a distinctive personal position in the essay you submit.

  7. Letters of recommendation can be very helpful to your application. One letter is required, although as many as three may be submitted. Recommendation letters should be written by teachers or other professionals who have firsthand knowledge of your art or academic achievements and can comment on your potential as a student.

    Please use the Common Application to invite your recommendation writers to submit letters through that service. Letters may also be sent directly to our mailing address (see below) or emailed to admissions@risd.edu.