Fall 2021

  1. During the senior year, students synthesize and apply what they have learned in their previous studies to the creation of a year-long project. Students develop, design, animate, direct, and produce these projects independently. Students receive weekly individual guidance from instructors and two critiques by established professionals from the world animation community. Class meetings are devoted to film screenings, group critique, and specialized technical workshops. Fall semester includes a one-week field trip to the Ottawa International Animation Festival in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Estimated Materials Cost: Varies considerably with production design; average $1,000.00 to $3,000.00. Deposit: $150.00 Estimated Travel Cost: $700 - $1,000. Major requirement; FAV majors only Open to non-majors with department permission. Registration by FAV Department, course not available via web registration. Majors are pre-registered by the Department Coordinator during the pre-registration period in the Spring semester preceding the senior year. Students make full payment via Slate. Payments can be made at any time once registration begins in May. Payment must be completed by September 1.
  2. Building on skills learned in the Intro Stop-motion Animation class, students will develop and produce one short stop-motion animation for professional portfolio and public screening. This course will provide students the opportunity to focus on particular issues of stop-motion animation and explore more advanced production techniques and processes. The course emphasizes art direction and project development. Students are encouraged to experiment with individual style and techniques of armature and set building, lighting, special effects and camera techniques. Weekly exercises are designed to strengthen students' conceptual and animation skills. In addition, a wide range of short films are screened to provide creative stimulus and demonstrate a variety of aesthetic and technical approaches. Estimated Materials Cost: $300.00 Major elective Permisison of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration.
  3. In this course students explore the fundamentals of animated movement, timing, and materials through various animation techniques, including working directly on film, drawing on paper, pixilation, cut-out animation, and modified-base processes. Over the course of the semester, students will create six short animations and a wide range of animated films will be studied to augment the student's understanding of the field. Estimated Materials Cost: $40.00 Elective Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration.
  4. This course examines preproduction methods for animation, including storytelling and cinematic language particular to the animation medium. Emphasizing practical approaches to research and concept development, the course will introduce structural tools including storyboards, writing, color scripts, animatics, and preliminary soundtracks. We will ask the central question "Why Animation?" as we cover topics such as point-of-view, expressive scale, use of metaphor, and transformation. Estimated Materials Cost: $50.00 Deposit: $150.00 Elective Open to sophomore and above Registration by FAV Department, course not available via web registration.
  5. A Collaborative Study Project (CSP) allows two students to work collaboratively to complete a faculty supervised project of independent study. Usually, a CSP is supervised by two faculty members, but with approval it may be supervised by one faculty member. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses, though it is not a substitute for a course if that course is regularly offered.
  6. The course will teach lighting, modeling and animation, with an emphasis on basic principles as they relate to 3D tools. The overall goal of this course is to generalize the study of the 3D world and to give students basic problem-solving skills needed for continued use of 3D animation software. After a series of lectures covering the basics of navigating the interface, each student produces a short animation. Each student has focused, individual time with the instructor. The class will be taught in Blender, but students who demonstrate a sufficient proficiency in other suitable packages may elect to use them for some assignments. Major elective Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration. Course may be repeated once for credit.
  7. This class uses Adobe After Effects as a tool to achieve the students' individual goals as artists. Starting with the basics of creating imagery in After Effects, the course moves through compositing, special effects, puppet animation and time manipulation. There is an overarching focus on core concepts such as quality of motion, layout and composition, color and form that surpass this single class. The first 6 weeks contain homework assignments that allow the students to grasp individual components of this highly technical toolset, while during the second 6 weeks the students concentrate on a final project. This project stresses the students' knowledge and forces them to grow as a digital animator as they find unique problems and solve them with instructor supervision. Major elective Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration.
  8. In Digital Practices, students learn to work with digital media as physical and conceptual material in their FAV practice. Through individual and group projects, screenings, in-class assignments, and readings, students will explore key concepts in digital media to build, expand, and deepen their time-based practice. Required for FAV Sophomores. Registration by FAV Department, course not available via web registration.
  9. Students in this course will produce two projects: a video camera exercise based on the observation of a particular event, and a fully researched and developed social documentary (the interaction of people in small groups or organizations) worked out in consultation with the instructor. Production teams (pairs) are encouraged for the main project. Weekly screenings of non-fiction films demonstrate stylistic developments and variety of content. Assigned readings in the history and theory of documentary promote in-class discussion. Estimated Materials Cost: $120.00 Deposit: $150.00 Major elective Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration.
  10. This studio investigates monitor and projector based installation through critical readings and studio practice. Emphasis is placed on concerns of material, site, space and interactivity. The course revisits the television monitor and television viewing context as the original video installation site. Students also explore the projector and projection beam, including its shape and volume, capacity to serve as a pure light source and as a means of resurfacing three-dimensional objects. Active installation artists visit the class for lectures and critiques. Estimated Materials Cost: $150.00 Deposit: $150.00 Major elective Permission of Instructor required. Contact fav@risd.edu to register.
  11. In Film Practices, students learn 16mm film processes, skills, and techniques - as a material and conceptual foundation necessary for every time-based practice. Exposure, focus, depth of field, and basic editing strategies are explored as tools for becoming fluent in the language of cinema. Students will build an understanding of the various meanings conveyed by aesthetic decisions regarding composition, movement, and editing. Through individual and group projects, screenings, in-class assignments, and readings, students will explore key concepts in material-based filmmaking to build, expand, and deepen their time-based practice. Estimated Materials Cost: $220.00 Deposit: $150.00 Major requirement Registration by FAV Department, course not available via web registration. Permission of Instructor required for non-majors.
  12. The intermediate year of animation study witnesses a significant transformation, in which the student grows from novice to independent director. This year-long studio develops an integrated understanding of the diverse aesthetic tools of animation, and teaches students directing for the animation medium. The course is comprised of four elements. First, weekly in-class structured experiments and homework awaken and refine the student's understanding of movement, timing, writing, editing, sound design, art directing, and use of materials. Second, students receive technical training in 2D animation production. Third, students screen and discuss animated works spanning history, culture, and design approach. Fourth, each student designs, animates, directs, and produces two independent projects, one in the fall and one in the spring. Estimated Materials Cost: $300.00 Deposit: $150.00 Major requirement; FAV majors Registration by FAV department, course not available via web registration
  13. Intermediate Film is a year-long course emphasizing technical production in sync sound film making. Theoretical concerns and cinematic techniques are stressed. We explore concepts of (and the relationships between) narrative, documentary and experimental filmmaking. The first half of the Fall semester, students work in assigned teams, completing a series of short exercises. In the second half of the term, class members individually create their own longer films for final projects. Students screen their work in class at various stages of completion: rushes, rough cuts, and fine cuts. In addition, there are weekly screenings of works by relevant filmmakers. Participation in class discussions is required. Estimated Materials Cost: $500.00 Deposit $150.00 Major requirement Registration by FAV Department, course not available via web registration.
  14. This year-long video production studio focuses on the possibilities of the video medium and the development of an individualized practice within it. Students will be exposed to a wide range of forms including but not limited to single-channel production, installation, performance, documentary, and digital cinema. Estimated Materials Cost: $125.00 Deposit: $150.00 Major requirement Registration by FAV Department, course not available via web registration.
  15. The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses. Permission of Instructor and GPA of 3.0 or higher is required. Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; the course is not available via web registration.
  16. The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses. Permission of Instructor and GPA of 3.0 or higher is required. Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; the course is not available via web registration.
  17. Lighting for the Moving Image is a hands-on workshop in lighting for film and video. Students are exposed to a broad range of equipment and techniques while they explore the overriding concept of light as an essential narrative element in motion picture. Workshops and discussions focus on the emotional impact of lighting as it pertains to a given story. Class time is divided between film screenings, one-day workshops on specific techniques, and an extended in-class group project in which students present light as the key narrative element. Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00 Deposit: $150.00 Major elective Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration.
  18. Live Performance for Online Audiences is a special online-only course focused on using networked technology to create engaging live performances for remote audiences. Students will study and craft performative interventions into online games and virtual worlds, build and perform interactive websites, and create networked browser extensions to support new and innovative forms of online performance. Through readings, collaborative code exercises, and group performances students will explore the concept of 'liveness' and how to better share unique, participatory human experiences in the absence of shared physical space. No prior coding experience is required for this course, though students with some background in web technology will find those skills put to good use. Access to a computer and a stable internet connection are essential for this course. Major elective Open to sophomores and above. Also offered as IDISC-2240; Register in the course for which credit is desired.
  19. In Media Interventions: Projections, ARGs & Malware, students will explore questions including: How does the meaning of a work change when the viewer is not intending to see it? When it shows up somewhere it doesn't belong? This course will cover a variety of digital techniques and modes that have been used to create art where it wasn't asked for: from computer viruses and malware, to DDoS and digital protest actions, to browser extensions and alternate reality games, to projection interventions on public buildings. Skills learned will include command line, AutoHotkey, JavaScript for browser extensions and projection mapping. In addition to technical knowledge, through readings and discussions we will build up a conceptual framework to think about the ethics, aesthetics and politics of digital interventions. This course will primarily be taught online, but will feature an on-campus workshop and projection outing in Providence from the Illuminator projection collective. Open to sophomores and above. Also offered as FAV-2241; Register in the course for which credit is desired.
  20. In this interdisciplinary critique-based class, advanced students take a rigorous look at the various ways time-based imagery functions in their work. With an emphasis on post-cinema, research- based, site-dependent, and performative practices, students in Meeting Points: Open Media examine their studio projects in-depth, through group critiques, a close analysis of critical concepts, and working with focus and discipline in their medium of choice. This course is required for FAV seniors in Open Media and is well-positioned to be a critical support for senior and graduate students looking for additional insight into the development and refinement of their work in the area of cross-disciplinary media art practice. Course work includes research, readings, critique sessions, group discussions, and visiting artist lectures. Fall semester includes a recommended field trip to a relevant exhibition or performance, and visits by related working artists and curators. Spring semester includes an emphasis on curatorial exhibition strategies, a recommended field trip to a relevant exhibition or performance, and visits by related working artists and curators. Required for FAV seniors in Open Media; open to seniors and grads in all disciplines. Also offered as IDISC-5291; Register in the course for which credit is desired. Registration by FAV Department, course not available via web registration.
  21. The professional Internship provides valuable exposure to a professional setting, enabling students to better establish a career path and define practical aspirations. Internship proposals are carefully vetted to determine legitimacy and must meet the contact hour requirements listed in the RISD Course Announcement. Permission of Instructor required.
  22. This is a year-long course of study, for which the student will complete a 10-20 minute live action work to final professional screening format. Students are free to choose genres and formats in which they want to work. Students have weekly meetings for screenings, guests, and technical workshops, and weekly small-group meetings to discuss their works-in-progress. Fall semester covers pre-production work on narrative projects: developing of scenarios, location scouting, budgets, initial camera tests or initial shooting of non-fiction projects. Visiting consultants come in to instruct in sound recording and cinematography, and guest critics come in November to review project proposals and/or footage. Estimated Materials Cost: $2,000. Deposit: $150.00 Major requirement; FAV majors only Registration by FAV Department, course not available via web registration.
  23. This path, within the senior studio options, allows for the exploration of a broad range of hybrid practices. Through the structural support of this year-long studio, students will produce a project that synthesizes their understanding of and aspirations for media art practice. Works produced use media as their point of departure, but may take a variety of forms including performance, installation, public art, intervention, networked/collaborative production, print publication, activism, etc. The course prepares students to work with depth in their use of media and as contemporary artists in a complex art world, in which media is often only one component in a larger project. Students receive weekly individual guidance from the instructor and peers, as well as two critiques by prominent working artists or related practitioners. During the spring semester, each student explores the notion of distribution intensively, resulting in the crafting of individualized forms of presentation. Each student also develops a portfolio of their work, focused on communicating their core interests to a defined group. Class meetings are devoted to presentations of related artists works, individual meetings and group critique. Fall semester includes field trips to events in the NY/New England area. Estimated Materials Cost: Varies considerably with production design. Deposit: $150.00 Major requirement Permission of Instructor required. Registration by FAV Department, course not available via web registration.
  24. Students in this course become engaged with sound as a partner in the language of time-based media. Through selected screenings, readings, and concept-driven design projects, the students develop ideas they can use as design principles in planning and working with sound. In addition, students get a hands-on overview of working with sound in a contemporary production environment, focusing on microphones, field recorders, and DAW software. Students learn to be better listeners and to be aware of how sound affects their perception of the world around them, as well as becoming technically competent to execute their creative ideas. Estimated Materials Cost: $50.00 Deposit: $150.00 Major elective Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration.
  25. This is a course demonstrating and exploring the basic techniques of Stop-Motion Puppet Animation, with the intent to provide students with hands-on creative experience in learning the potentials of the medium, and an introduction to filmic language. Studio exercises strengthen individual technical skills in basic armature construction and model making, animating pose-to-pose movement, the basic walk, expressions and gestures, clay animation with lip-sync, set construction and lighting for three-dimensional animation. Basic sound recording, mixing and editing are also covered. Conceptual skills are exercised through exploring intent, storytelling, storyboarding, editorial concepts, character performance, art direction, and basic sound design. This class is based on process and experimentation. It is meant to provide a strong foundation in the basics of stop-motion animation filmmaking, as well as the confidence to experiment further in one's future work. The idea is to enjoy the process by understanding it; control is born of experimentation and experience. This is a one semester class repeated in the spring. First preference given to FAV majors. Second preference given to Illustration majors. Estimated Materials Cost: $40.00 Major elective Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration.
  26. This course is designed as an introduction to the 113-year history of the projected moving image (film, animation, and video). Artistic expression in these forms will be emphasized. Students discover new areas of interest while watching carefully selected examples of films and videos. During all classes, students will view films representing different styles and periods of filmmaking. About half of the classes are devoted to contemporary films. Critical thinking will be encouraged and fostered during classroom discussions. Clear expression of these thoughts will be developed through assigned readings and weekly writing assignments. During the semester, students learn about specific artists, schools of filmmaking, genres, and fields within the history of the film, animation, and video. Students also develop a common language by learning the meaning and proper usage of a glossary of common film terms. At select classes, film artists are present to introduce and discuss their work. Other guests include improvisational musicians who accompany silent films. Major requirement; FAV majors Liberal Arts elective credit for non-majors pending seat availability and permission of Instructor.
  27. In Video Practices, students will work with digital video cameras, sound recorders and microphones, and editing and color correction software. Through projects, screenings, in-class assignments, and readings, students will explore key concepts in digital moving-image making to build, expand, and deepen their time-based practice. Estimated Materials Cost: $60.00 Deposit: $150.00 Major requirement Registration by FAV Department, course not available via web registration.
  28. This one-credit hands on technical intensive is required for students who completed Animation Practices fully remotely in the Fall of 2020. Registration by FAV Department, course not available via web registration.
  29. This one-credit hands on technical intensive is required for students who completed Video Practices or Intermediate Studio: Live Action fully remotely in the Fall of 2020. Registration by FAV Department, course not available via web registration.
  30. This course is an examination of all forms of writing relevant to film and media creation. This includes a thorough study of traditional 'story film' screenwriting, as well as writing techniques for documentary production and preproduction writing problems, such as proposals, treatments, and outlines. It is also a study of nontraditional writing problems in filmmaking: writing for nonlinear or experimental films, writing for a framework for improvisation, using text as a direct generator of filmed work, and even using text as the content of film. And last, but certainly not least, there is considerable attention paid to developing skills in critical writing. By the end of this course, students will have a portfolio of written work, including a polished draft of a short film or long-form first act, which demonstrates a wide variety of techniques for relating the written word to media. Estimated Materials Cost: $25.00 Major elective Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web regstration.

Wintersession 2022

  1. This Wintersession collaborative documentary film course in Peru's Cusco region will offer RISD students the opportunity to engage with Andean rural communities and immerse themselves in Quechua political, social and economic culture. Engaging a collaborative methodology, RISD students will work on documentary film projects with local students and Quechua community members -- a process that honors and reflects the voices of the partnering communities. Previous knowledge of video making is not required. The class welcomes a group of RISD/Brown students from diverse disciplines. We will work and learn in collaboration with DocuPeru, a group that promotes and disseminates documentary projects as agents of empowerment, expression and democratization of local communities. During our first week in Lima we will explore Peru's history and culture, visiting historical sites and museums; we will then workshop and exchange with Peruvian media makers, art historians, anthropologists and with Latin American university students. From Lima, we will travel high in the Andes to Accha, a rural district in the Cusco region. In Accha we will spend three weeks exploring documentary projects in collaboration with Quechua communities. We will participate in community events and converse with leaders, farmers and families to learn about each other and about the life and culture of the region. Students will then divide into groups to collaborate with community members to conceptualize and produce short films and documentary projects that address those social, cultural or economic issues important to the community. Through lectures, workshops, film screenings and hands-on exploration, students will develop their filmmaking skills and learn to work within a community to engage and address community needs. Although the course focuses primarily on film practices, it is open to documentary projects in other mediums - photography, animation, sound. We will present our final projects in celebration with the communities and end the term with a visit to the ancient city of Cusco and a trip to UNESCO World Heritage Site Machu Picchu, the15th century Inca citadel situated on a 7,970' mountain ridge. Applications open in September. Registration begins in October at a time to be announced. All students are required to remain in good academic standing in order to participate in the WS travel course/studio. A minimum GPA of 2.50 is required. Failure to remain in good academic standing can lead to removal from the course, either before or during the course. Also in cases where WS travel courses and studios do not reach student capacity, the course may be cancelled after the last day of Wintersession travel course registration. As such, all students are advised not to purchase flights for participation in Wintersession travel courses until the course is confirmed to run, which happens within the week after the final Wintersession travel course registration period. Permission of Instructor required. 2022WS Estimated Travel Cost: $4,400.00 - airfare not included. ***Off-Campus Study***
  2. This course is designed to explore different animation techniques and materials, including working directly on film, drawing on paper, painting under the camera, object animation, cut-outs, and pixilation. It also teaches the fundamentals of animated movement and timing. Students in this course each make six short animations, with separate, synchronized sound tracks. At the end of the course, students create a DVD compilation of all their projects. A wide range of independent animated films are screened to demonstrate different techniques and approaches to animation. Estimated Materials Cost: $65.00
  3. A Collaborative Study Project (CSP) allows two students to work collaboratively to complete a faculty supervised project of independent study. Usually, a CSP is supervised by two faculty members, but with approval it may be supervised by one faculty member. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses, though it is not a substitute for a course if that course is regularly offered.
  4. Film Explorations is a beginner's studio production course introducing the student to fundamental cinematic techniques. Students will learn the rudiments of film form and process from concept to edit, through a series of exercises in and outside of class. Class sessions consist of technical demonstrations, critiques of projects, discussion, shooting exercises, as well as screening and analyzing films.
  5. This course is designed to teach students how to utilize the computer to create animation. Special emphasis is placed on exploration and experimentation as it applies to computer-generated or computer-assisted animation. The class covers hand drawn non-computer originated animation, cut out animation, computer generated drawn animation, painting under the camera, rotoscoping, and an introduction to the concepts used in 3D animation. Additionally, an introduction to sound design and editing will be explored in the final animation project. Estimated Materials Cost: $40.00
  6. The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses. Permission of Instructor and GPA of 3.0 or higher is required. Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; the course is not available via web registration.
  7. The professional Internship provides valuable exposure to a professional setting, enabling students to better establish a career path and define practical aspirations. Internship proposals are carefully vetted to determine legitimacy and must meet the contact hour requirements listed in the RISD Course Announcement. Permission of Instructor required.
  8. During the senior year, students synthesize and apply what they have learned in their previous studies to the creation of a year-long project. Students develop, design, animate, direct, and produce these projects independently. Students receive weekly individual guidance from instructors and two critiques by established professionals from the world animation community. Class meetings are devoted to film screenings, group critique, and specialized technical workshops. Deposit: $150.00 Open to FAV majors only Permission of Instructor required. Registration by FAV Department, course not available via web registration.
  9. This is a year-long course of study, for which the student will complete a 10-20 minute live action work to final professional screening format. Students are free to choose genres and formats in which they want to work. Students have weekly meetings for screenings, guests, and technical workshops, and weekly small-group meetings to discuss their works-in-progress. During Wintersession, the students perform production work in video and film, organize crews for filmmaking, review rushes and do initial editing and sound work on their degree projects. Deposit: $150.00 Open to FAV majors only Permission of Instructor required. Registration by FAV Department, course not available via web registration.
  10. Over the course of a year, senior students integrate their media skills through a cross-disciplinary approach with time-based media practice, resulting in a developed work or a series of smaller related works meant for exhibition or performance. This path is for students that wish to engage with time-based media in non-traditional ways, such as through installation, performance, public art, interactivity, intervention, networked/collaborative production, activism, etc.. Students research, develop, design, prototype, direct and produce these works independently. Students receive weekly individual guidance from the instructor and partnered peers. Class meetings are devoted to lectures, informational workshops, student presentations of related research, individual meetings and group critique. During Wintersession, students perform production work, test and analyze parameters and results. Students have weekly meetings for lectures, guests, technical workshops, and weekly small-group meetings to discuss their works-in-progress. Open to FAV majors only Permission of Instructor required. Registration by FAV Department, course not available via web registration.
  11. This class will offer students practical and conceptual tools for curating film, animation, and video as a means of engaging with their own practice. With an emphasis on research and screenings, the course will cover basic information on assembling a program (structure, dealing with distributors, resources for research) to more specific ones (curation outside the art world, nonacademic curation, curatorial residencies). Each week a thematic framework (examples inculde materiality, feminist/queer lens, transmedia narratives) will be studied to view an approach in assembling a program. There is a one-day field trip to the Film-Makers' Cooperative in NYC. The class concludes with student teams curating and presenting a program.

Spring 2022

  1. Building on concepts from Sound for the Screen, students in Advanced Sound Design and Production explore advanced topics, aesthetic considerations, and stylistic conventions of modern audio and music production for picture. Through a series of screenings, discussions, and concept-driven design projects, students develop a deep understanding of the function of sound in time-based media. Students work hands-on with DAW software, synthesizers, and professional recording equipment to gain the capability to successfully translate their artistic intent to sound production. Major elective Open to juniors and above; FAV majors only Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration. Interested students should email fav@risd.edu.
  2. In this course students explore the fundamentals of animated movement, timing, and materials through various animation techniques, including working directly on film, drawing on paper, pixilation, cut-out animation, and modified-base processes. Over the course of the semester, students will create six short animations and a wide range of animated films will be studied to augment the student's understanding of the field. Estimated Materials Cost: $40.00 Elective Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration.
  3. This course focuses primarily on hand-drawn character design, development, and movement. Beginning with simple model sheets drawn from different points of view, we explore how action and context can affect the design of characters. The same characters are then taken straight into animation. Students use the characters they created as actors who must perform in a variety of situations, and interact directly with the physical space around them. Exercises include walk cycles, lip-syncing, anticipation and follow-through, weight and resistance, and lessons in narrative, storyboarding, and drawing skills. A longer, three-week final project provides an opportunity for students to show what they have learned, and to create a cohesive story from start to finish. All supporting software is covered in a series of simple workshops. Class time involves critiques of homework assignments, demonstrations of techniques and screenings of a diverse range of films. Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00 Major elective Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration.
  4. This course is a study of the theories and methods of character design as applied to narrative forms. This class asks students to push beyond stereotypical designs to develop two-dimensional characters that are both personally and culturally resonant and imaginative. Particular emphasis is placed on the expressive power of abstract forms and color. Through exploring individual perceptions of good and evil, success and failure, as well as beauty and ugliness, students create characters that are highly original. Research, thorough craftsmanship, and sophisticated design are stressed. Major elective Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration.
  5. A Collaborative Study Project (CSP) allows two students to work collaboratively to complete a faculty supervised project of independent study. Usually, a CSP is supervised by two faculty members, but with approval it may be supervised by one faculty member. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses, though it is not a substitute for a course if that course is regularly offered.
  6. This course explores the use of the computer to create animation and motion graphics. Emphasis is placed on producing dynamic movement using keyframe interpolation and vector graphics. In addition, students will work with sound and motion data, coded expressions and effects generators to expand the range of animation possibilities. Through a series of individual and group projects, students will explore and experiment with computer animation techniques and gain experience with digital tools. A range of films will be screened complementing each week's focus. Knowledge of Adobe After Effects and Illustrator is helpful but not required. In addition to project work, students will reinforce software concepts by viewing weekly video tutorials outside class. Estimated Materials Cost: $40.00 Elective Open to sophomore and above Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration.
  7. The course will teach lighting, modeling and animation, with an emphasis on basic principles as they relate to 3D tools. The overall goal of this course is to generalize the study of the 3D world and to give students basic problem-solving skills needed for continued use of 3D animation software. After a series of lectures covering the basics of navigating the interface, each student produces a short animation. Each student has focused, individual time with the instructor. The class will be taught in Blender, but students who demonstrate a sufficient proficiency in other suitable packages may elect to use them for some assignments. Major elective Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration. Course may be repeated once for credit.
  8. This class uses Adobe After Effects as a tool to achieve the students' individual goals as artists. Starting with the basics of creating imagery in After Effects, the course moves through compositing, special effects, puppet animation and time manipulation. There is an overarching focus on core concepts such as quality of motion, layout and composition, color and form that surpass this single class. The first 6 weeks contain homework assignments that allow the students to grasp individual components of this highly technical toolset, while during the second 6 weeks the students concentrate on a final project. This project stresses the students' knowledge and forces them to grow as a digital animator as they find unique problems and solve them with instructor supervision. Major elective Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration.
  9. In Digital Practices, students learn to work with digital media as physical and conceptual material in their FAV practice. Through individual and group projects, screenings, in-class assignments, and readings, students will explore key concepts in digital media to build, expand, and deepen their time-based practice. Required for FAV Sophomores. Registration by FAV Department, course not available via web registration.
  10. In the Directing class, students are encouraged to go beyond the first instinct or idea, and to develop a project to its fullest potential, particularly with respect to meaning and to potential modes of execution. Students work on a variety of scenes throughout the semester, complete several short assignments during and outside of class, and read handouts and excerpts from texts. An ongoing focus throughout the semester is an exploration of the methods of communication between directors and actors. Students direct each other, young actors from the Carriage House School, professional actors from the community (brought in for two classes), and actors of their choosing for final projects. As they direct rehearsals, students utilize a variety of specific tools that enable them to maximize the creativity and fertility of their relationships with actors, and to make adjustments in performances quickly and effectively. The latter third of the semester also focuses on techniques for script analysis. These are used to discover the range of creative possibilities in a given text, and to thoroughly prepare and organize directors for rehearsals and shoots. An ongoing, general goal of the course is also for each student to reflect upon and identify their personal themes as a director. Major elective Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration.
  11. In this studio course, students will engage in a thorough technical and conceptual walkthrough of post-production techniques, with an emphasis on editing and sound design, managing projects, color grading, and deliverable design. By reflecting on the possibilities embedded in the filmed material, we will explore editing as a generative process that can clarify themes within a piece and shape or even reimagine its structure. We will explore editing strategies that focus on the visual and conceptual forces at play when shots come together, transform each other and create new meanings. Students should be familiar with production terminology and methods, cameras, and digital video and audio. Estimated Materials Cost: $280.00 Deposit: $150.00 Major elective Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registraiton.
  12. Experimental Filmmaking has as much in common with song and sculpture as it does with cinema, and stresses process over script. The course is designed as a hands-on production experience where visual and audial ideas can be tested, combined, discarded, manipulated, investigated. Emphasis is placed on the unique properties of 16mm film as aesthetic material, as well as on the time-based conceptual potential of digital media. The course includes a brief overview of the techniques, theory, language, and history of Experimental Cinema. Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00 Deposit: $150.00 Major elective Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration.
  13. What constitutes cinematic narrative, distinct from other forms of storytelling? How do we engage film form to tell a story, generate an idea or an emotion? How can we alter a traditional narrative structure, and, what are the conceptual implications of these transformations? How can we use color to construct the subjective space of a character, or use sound to manipulate the temporal order of the story? Is there an ethics to a camera movement? In this advanced production workshop, we will explore cinematic narrative first by closely studying how a group of classical, experimental, and contemporary filmmakers have engaged narrative through filmic form. We will then formulate our own new cinematic narratives. Cinema is no longer restricted to the theater or the gallery. Moving images surround us online, on our phones and screens, in the streets, and in stores, taxis, and train stations. We will consider the formal parameters of these new cinematic spaces and their possibilities. Coursework consists of the production of several short narrative films with film viewing, analysis and discussion as counterpoint. Students must have their own portable hard drive, closed-back headphones, and high speed UHS-II SDXC memory card. Estimated Materials Cost: $300.00 for non-majors. Deposit: $150.00 Major elective Open to sophomores and above; FAV majors only Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration. Interested students should email fav@risd.edu.
  14. In Film Practices, students learn 16mm film processes, skills, and techniques - as a material and conceptual foundation necessary for every time-based practice. Exposure, focus, depth of field, and basic editing strategies are explored as tools for becoming fluent in the language of cinema. Students will build an understanding of the various meanings conveyed by aesthetic decisions regarding composition, movement, and editing. Through individual and group projects, screenings, in-class assignments, and readings, students will explore key concepts in material-based filmmaking to build, expand, and deepen their time-based practice. Estimated Materials Cost: $220.00 Deposit: $150.00 Major requirement Registration by FAV Department, course not available via web registration. Permission of Instructor required for non-majors.
  15. This is the second semester of a year-long animation study, in which the student grows from novice to independent director. This studio develops an integrated understanding of the diverse aesthetic tools of animation, and teaches students directing for the animation medium. The course is comprised of four elements. First, weekly in-class structured experiments and homework awaken and refine the student's understanding of movement, timing, writing, editing, sound design, art directing, and use of materials. Second, students receive technical training in 2D animation production. Third, students screen and discuss animated works spanning history, culture, and design approach. Fourth, each student designs, animates, directs, and produces two independent projects, one in the fall and one in the spring. Estimated Materials Cost: Varies considerably with production design; averages $300.00 to $1,200.00 Deposit: $150.00 Major requirement Registration by FAV Department, course not available via web registration.
  16. Intermediate Film is a year-long course emphasizing technical production in sync sound film making. Theoretical concerns and cinematic techniques are stressed. We explore concepts of (and the relationships between) narrative, documentary and experimental filmmaking. During Spring semester, the course is devoted to improving skills in many aspects of live action filmmaking, including conceptualization, budgeting, camera work, and sound recording. Projects are transferred to tape and edited digitally. In addition, there are weekly screenings of works by relevant filmmakers. Participation in class discussions is required. Estimated Materials Cost: $500.00 Deposit: $150.00 Major requirement Registration by FAV Department, course not available via web registration.
  17. This is a continuation of a year-long video production studio, focused on the possibilities of the video medium and the development of an individualized practice within it. Students are challenged to put to practice the research and experiments of the fall semester by producing a finished authored work for exhibition. The practical work of production is emphasized, and participation in the critical workshop environment is required. Continued research, development of technical skill, ability to plan and document process are expected. Estimated Materials Cost: $150.00 Deposit: $150.00 Major requirement Registration by FAV Department, course not available via web registration.
  18. The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses. Permission of Instructor and GPA of 3.0 or higher is required. Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; the course is not available via web registration.
  19. The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses. Permission of Instructor and GPA of 3.0 or higher is required. Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; the course is not available via web registration.
  20. In this interdisciplinary critique-based class, advanced students take a rigorous look at the various ways time-based imagery functions in their work. With an emphasis on post-cinema, research- based, site-dependent, and performative practices, students in Meeting Points: Open Media examine their studio projects in-depth, through group critiques, a close analysis of critical concepts, and working with focus and discipline in their medium of choice. This course is required for FAV seniors in Open Media and is well-positioned to be a critical support for senior and graduate students looking for additional insight into the development and refinement of their work in the area of cross-disciplinary media art practice. Course work includes research, readings, critique sessions, group discussions, and visiting artist lectures. Fall semester includes a recommended field trip to a relevant exhibition or performance, and visits by related working artists and curators. Spring semester includes an emphasis on curatorial exhibition strategies, a recommended field trip to a relevant exhibition or performance, and visits by related working artists and curators. Required for FAV seniors in Open Media; open to seniors and grads in all disciplines. Also offered as IDISC-5292; Register in the course for which credit is desired. Registration by FAV Department, course not available via web registration.
  21. The professional Internship provides valuable exposure to a professional setting, enabling students to better establish a career path and define practical aspirations. Internship proposals are carefully vetted to determine legitimacy and must meet the contact hour requirements listed in the RISD Course Announcement. Permission of Instructor required.
  22. During the senior year, students synthesize and apply what they have learned in their previous studies to the creation of a year-long project. Students develop, design, animate, direct, and produce these projects independently. Students receive weekly individual guidance from instructors and two critiques by established professionals from the world animation community. Class meetings are devoted to film screenings, group critique, and specialized technical workshops. Spring Semester features speakers from different sectors of the animation field who meet with students to prepare them for professional practice. During the spring semester each student also prepares a professional reel and portfolio. The year culminates with the RISD Senior Festival, a public showcase. Estimated Materials Cost: Varies considerably with production design; average $1,000.00 to $3,000.00. Deposit: $150.00 Major requirement; FAV majors only Registration by FAV Department, course not available via web registration.
  23. This is a year-long course of study, for which the student will complete a 10-20 minute live action work to final professional screening format. Students are free to choose genres and formats in which they want to work. Students have weekly meetings for screenings, guests, and technical workshops, and weekly small-group meetings to discuss their works-in-progress. Spring semester covers post-production, editing, sound mixing, color correction, outputting, and a series of professional practice workshops. A guest critic reviews work in early April. Final projects are screened at a public film festival in May, which is reviewed by the local media. Estimated Materials Cost: $2,000.00. Deposit: $150.00 Major requirement; FAV majors only Registration by FAV Department, course not available via web registration.
  24. This path, within the senior studio options, allows for the exploration of a broad range of hybrid practices. Through the structural support of this year-long studio, students will produce a project that synthesizes their understanding of and aspirations for media art practice. Works produced use media as their point of departure, but may take a variety of forms including performance, installation, public art, intervention, networked/collaborative production, print publication, activism, etc. The course prepares students to work with depth in their use of media and as contemporary artists in a complex art world, in which media is often only one component in a larger project. Students receive weekly individual guidance from the instructor and peers, as well as two critiques by prominent working artists or related practitioners. Class meetings are devoted to presentations of related artists works, individual meetings and group critique. During the spring semester, each student explores the notion of distribution intensively, resulting in the crafting of individualized forms of presentation. Each student also develops a portfolio of their work, focused on communicating their core interests to a defined group. Spring Semester features speakers, working with related practices, who meet with students to prepare them for their professional future. Estimated Materials Cost: Varies considerably with production design. Deposit: $150.00 Major requirement Permission of Instructor required. Registration by FAV Department, course not available via web registration.
  25. In Sight Gags and Hidden Monsters, students will explore the development of animation in America through making work that interrogates its historical and economic context. They will examine the possible motivations behind the "rules" of mainstream animation, and develop their own animated interventions to subvert, extend or re-imagine them, or to re-contextualize them in their own work. Students will examine the influence of vaudeville and minstrelsy on humor and the grotesque in studio cartoons, and its role in inscribing and containing "dangerous" groups or ideas. Their work in the class should critique, interrogate, subvert or reveal the history and motivation of these tropes. The course will include screenings, readings, animated exercises, and a longer project. Contact fav@risd.edu to register.
  26. Students in this course become engaged with sound as a partner in the language of time-based media. Through selected screenings, readings, and concept-driven design projects, the students develop ideas they can use as design principles in planning and working with sound. In addition, students get a hands-on overview of working with sound in a contemporary production environment, focusing on microphones, field recorders, and DAW software. Students learn to be better listeners and to be aware of how sound affects their perception of the world around them, as well as becoming technically competent to execute their creative ideas. Estimated Materials Cost: $50.00 Deposit: $150.00 Major elective Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration.
  27. This is a course demonstrating and exploring the basic techniques of Stop-Motion Puppet Animation, with the intent to provide students with hands-on creative experience in learning the potentials of the medium, and an introduction to filmic language. Studio exercises strengthen individual technical skills in basic armature construction and model making, animating pose-to-pose movement, the basic walk, expressions and gestures, clay animation with lip-sync, set construction and lighting for three-dimensional animation. Basic sound recording, mixing and editing are also covered. Conceptual skills are exercised through exploring intent, storytelling, storyboarding, editorial concepts, character performance, art direction, and basic sound design. This class is based on process and experimentation. It is meant to provide a strong foundation in the basics of stop-motion animation filmmaking, as well as the confidence to experiment further in one's future work. The idea is to enjoy the process by understanding it; control is born of experimentation and experience. This is a one semester class repeated in the spring. First preference given to FAV majors. Second preference given to Illustration majors. Estimated Materials Cost: $40.00 Major elective Permission of Instructor required. Course not available via web registration.
  28. In Video Practices, students will work with digital video cameras, sound recorders and microphones, and editing and color correction software. Through projects, screenings, in-class assignments, and readings, students will explore key concepts in digital moving-image making to build, expand, and deepen their time-based practice. Estimated Materials Cost: $60.00 Deposit: $150.00 Major requirement Registration by FAV Department, course not available via web registration.
  29. Okay, you have an idea! What do you do with it? In this rapid-paced 4-week workshop, I'll take you through the steps: from writing a logline, developing a pitch deck, pitching and selling. Through weekly assignments, students will develop a hands-on understanding of professional elements of pre-production, aspects of production, technical workflow, and the steps of post production through to release. Fully Online; open to juniors and above. Course not available via web registration. Contact the FAV Department at fav@risd.edu to register.
  30. In Writing an Original TV Series, students will learn the basics of the TV structure and practice an organic approach to developing their original pilot, series engine, and series bible. We will analyze a variety of TV shows like Mad Men, Transparent, The Queen's Gambit, Atlanta, Twin Peaks for the curicial elements that make them successful and unique. Students will choose one of the existing TV formats (TV Drama, TV Comedy/Dramedy, Limited Series) for their final project. We will learn how to develop an initial idea into a powerful "story engine", create a pilot, and build the blueprint for the episodes that follow. Students will discover strategies for creating engaging, complex characters that can sustain a series over multiple seasons. The course will consist of lectures, seminars, and workshops. The final project for the class is a pitch deck and a pilot episode for an original TV series. Students will have th eoption of working individually or collaborate on a final project.