Fall 2021

  1. The purpose of the course is to introduce students to advanced CAD techniques while enhancing their design processes by utilizing additional CAD applications. Extending the department's CAD education from 'Designing with Solidworks,' several categories will be offered to explore further CAD applications including Rhino with plug-ins, Cinema 4D, MasterCAM with SolidWorks, unreal Engine, and more. The specific offerings vary year to year. Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00 Major requirement; ID majors only Open to junior and above
  2. The 6-credit Advanced Design studios offer second semester juniors and seniors the opportunity to investigate product, socially responsible, and sustainable design; innovation through science and technology and other topics in contemporary practice. These studios are designed to strengthen the student's ability to conduct research, ideation, material exploration, presentation, and concept validation. Studios meet two days per week. ID juniors and seniors are required to take a total of three advanced studios. Major requirement; ID majors only Open to non-majors pending seat availability and permission of Department. Registration of Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.
  3. Climate Crisis & Design, is a seminar, punctuated by hands-on studio projects, which investigates the multiple intersections of climate change and design. What role should a designer play to maximize their positive impact on the overwhelming challenge of climate change? What balance of breaking-into and breaking down existing systems and stakeholders is most tactical? When does effective strategy become manipulation and why does it matter? We explore essential questions like these and many more. This course has four main phases: Illustration, Inquiry, Iteration, and Inspiration. The first phase involves a substantial and collaborative design audit of the state of design and climate, with students researching and presenting on topics such as existing standards, communication strategies, and adjacent social movements. In the second phase, students engage in a design research process towards problem discovery and definition. The third phase takes on this self-defined problem from a prospective view, drawing on techniques of foresight and incremental iteration from the present. The fourth and final phase of the course takes a futuring view, drawing on theories of system design and techniques of backcasting. These two final phases, with their propositional deliverables, will include discussion of audience definition, documentation, and media strategy with the goal of maximizing the strategic reach of these projects in their lives beyond the course. By studying historical context (i.e. Carson, McKibben), contemporary environmental meta-criticism (i.e. Nordhaus & Shellenberger, Latour), primary text artifacts (i.e. Jemisin, IPCC reports, LCAs), theory (i.e. Meadows, Morton) and thought-leading designers (i.e. Orf, McDonough, Ginsberg), students will leave with a well-rounded and interdisciplinary grounding in the state of the conversation and how to create work into its gaps and over its cutting edges. Their research will culminate in four portfolio projects grounded in critical thinking about the most important challenge of our lifetime. Open to ID majors only; seniors and graduate students. Open to non-majors pending seat availability and permission of instructor.
  4. A Collaborative Study Project (CSP) allows a team of students to work collaboratively to complete a faculty supervised project of independent study. Usually, a CSP is supervised by two faculty members, but with approval it may be supervised by one faculty member. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses, though it is not a substitute for a course if that course is regularly offered. Permission of Academic Advisor and Department Head is required in advance of posted Registrar's deadline. GPA of 3.0 or higher is required. Register by completing the Collaborative Study Application available on the Registrar's website.
  5. This course is an introduction to conceptual and manual skills that represent necessary steps in design evolution. Students strengthen skills by completion of several processes and exercises. Critical thinking and concept generation is a primary focus, drawing and model making activities help to establish this process. Throughout the course each student will focus on improving communication skills and the ability to project or sell ideas. Estimated Materials Cost: $15.00 Major requirement; ID majors only Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.
  6. Can the design practice benefit from a contemplative practice like mindfulness? What happens when designers include a mindful approach within their practice? Mindfulness meditation originated thousands of years ago and yet has become a daily part of the lives of millions worldwide while the design profession is responsible for reshaping how we relate to our world It seems natural that these two major influences converge to the potential benefit of both. As designers tackle ever more complex societal challenges while seeking ways to became more empathetic and more ethical can these efforts be empowered by an integration of design thinking and mindfulness? Using first-person methods to explore these ideas while considering the effect designers have on culture, society, and the ecology. Through hands-on investigation we will explore how changes to our approach may improve the quality of our impact on humanity and the environment. While practicing mindfulness inspired activities designed to enhance one's receptivity to insight during ideation and conceptual development as well as practice ways to design objects/experiences that inspire wonder and joy in the audience. Course work will involve readings, writing, group discussions, and concept development, and there will be guest lectures, and field trips. The course will include a combination of individual and group work as well as elements of design drawing practice and board game development. Open to seniors and graduate level students in Industrial Design only.
  7. There are some claims that we are currently living In the most peaceful time in modern history. Author Steven Pinker makes this argument In his 2011 book The Better Angels of our Nature: Why violence has Declined. While acts of war and organized violence performed by nation states may shed less blood today, we still live in societies that must address the changing definitions of security. Drawing from a variety of foresight practices and horizon scanning exercises, this course will explore how we might anticipate or adapt to conflicts and unexpected scenarios in the not so distant future. This hands-on studio course will include guest lectures and discussions with subject matter experts from the fields of biosecurity, cyber threats, nuclear threat reduction and the military. This course Is open to undergraduate and master's level students from across departments. Design+Security is made up of two sections that are taught concurrently. Section 01 is a 6-credit studio that meets twice a week (Tuesday and Thursday) and Section 02 is a 3-credit studio that will meet once a week (on Tuesdays). Both sections are open to graduate and undergraduate students from across the college. Because of the unusual structure of the course, all formal reviews will be held on Tuesdays and participating guests will join the sections on Tuesdays. In general shared work will take place In the Tuesday meetings, and additional research, interviews, project development and production will take place on Thursdays. Open to juniors and above.
  8. The purpose of this course is to expose students to SolidWorks, a widely used solid modeling software program. Students will learn how to translate their hand-sketches into three-dimensional CAD models. Lectures and assignments will focus on the development of form as it applies to plastic part design and assembly. Physical models will be realized through ABS rapid prototyping allowing students to experience true plastic part design. Students should anticipate additional costs for supplies and materials. Major requirement; ID majors only Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.
  9. Graduate Communication Introduction is a studio course about writing and speaking as design tools. We think about writing and speaking in two ways. First as a communication tool and second as a design tool. On the communication side, we address the many ways that writing and speaking surrounds a designed object (as a proposal, as sales copy, as instructions to users, as specs for manufacture, as criticism, etc.). We think about the audiences for those various kinds of communication and how to think about what they want and need. We look at examples of great design communication and we develop and practice our own skills for succinctly explaining our ideas. On the design tool side, we think about the many ways that writing can help clarify and quickly test out ideas. We think about writing as a form of rapid prototyping alongside sketching, model making, etc. We talk about what writing is good at, when other methods might be more useful, and when to combine methods. We explore techniques such as design fiction, scenario planning, and other narrative methodologies that are used in industrial design and related fields. Graduate major requirement; ID majors only Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.
  10. The execution of two assigned design projects provides the framework for a thorough examination of the design process. This structured and intensive studio will focus on the relationship between the implementation of sound design methodologies and successful problem solving in the design process. This first studio experience is intended to provide the methodological infrastructure for the remainder of the M.I.D. thesis experience. Graduate major requirement; ID majors only Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.
  11. Graduate Thesis Communications I is a studio course run in parallel with our sibling studio course which focuses on design research methods. Together, we will spend the fall semester casting about, planning and prototyping towards some kind of design proposal or product for execution in the spring. We think about writing in two ways. First as a design tool and second as a communication tool. On the tool for design side, we think about the many ways that writing can help clarify and quickly test out ideas. We think about writing as a form of rapid prototyping alongside sketching, model making, etc. We talk about what writing is good at, when other methods might be more useful, and when to combine methods. We use writing to help clarify and crystalize the thesis plan. On the communication side, we think about the many ways that writing surrounds a designed object (as a proposal, as sales copy, as instructions to users, as specs for manufacture, as criticism, etc.). We think about the audiences for those various kinds of writing and how to think about what they want and need. We talk about the thesis as a tool for explaining the design but also as a tool for helping you advance your career goals. At the end of the course, you will have a partially complete draft of your thesis. which will set you up for an excellent spring. Graduate major requirement; ID majors only Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.
  12. This course introduces the Graduate Thesis project starting with the development of a research question through secondary research reading methods. This question has its assumptions articulated and verified through experimental making and primary research methods that engage specific audiences for qualitative discourse. Graduate major requirement; ID majors only Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.
  13. History is a powerful tool; a basic understanding of the history of design and familiarity with important design movements and designers is essential for thorough design work. By examining the work of other designers, we are better able to identify our own interests and concerns, and avoid repeating mistakes that have been navigated in the past. This lecture-based class will present the history of Industrial Design in a way that links it to today's studio work, and offers connection points to link past innovation and design activity with future design success. The lectures present a chronological overview of the profession of Industrial Design and its antecedents. Topics discussed will include major design movements, significant designers, manufacturers, and design-related companies, innovations in technology and material use, the development of sales, marketing, and user-focused designing, and the history of design process. Coursework includes extensive reading, in-class presentations based on independent research, projects, and writing. Major requirement; ID majors Registration of Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration. Liberal Arts elective credit for non-majors pending seat availability.
  14. This course will acclimate new graduate students to the shop environment of the Industrial Design Department. The Metal, Wood and Model Shops are invaluable resources, clarifying pragmatic aspects of the design process from general feasibility of manufacturing to the challenges of translating concepts into tangible objects. This course covers excerpted information from both undergraduate courses Wood I and Metals I and emphasizes safety in the utilization of shop facilities. Graduate major requirement; ID majors only Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.
  15. You will be introduced to the fundamentals of footwear design and construction based on two different shoe styles: pump/court/slip-on and derby. During that first project you will develop skills for working with a last, pattern making, sewing, construction and finishing techniques. These skills will be applied to a second project of your own choosing and design. You will gain general understanding of the parameters of the last and its correlation to feet and pattern-making. You will gain general understanding of footwear production. From Sketching demo to Spec Specification Sheet Overview to different construction techniques applied. You will acquire a general understanding of footwear construction and terminology. You will learn basic pattern making skills and how to develop your own ideas/styles using the skills acquired. You will acquire skills necessary to work with the tools/machines on hand (knives, sewing machine, lasting pliers etc.) You will develop the skills necessary for constructing basic cemented footwear from start to finish, applying it to different styles. You will learn about materials used in shoemaking, in particular leather, but also alternative materials. For the second half of the semester (final project) you will apply and experiment using techniques/skills learned on a style of your choosing, incorporating your personal skill set to design and build your own unique footwear project (either a pair or two singles). Open to Industrial Design majors only; juniors and above.
  16. The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses. Permission of Academic Advisor and Department Head is required in advance of posted Registrar's deadline. GPA of 3.0 or higher is required. Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website.
  17. This course introduces the students to methods, materials, and manufacturing processes that translate design activity into finished goods. A significant portion of downstream design activity is devoted to manufacturing issues - the techniques by which materials are selected, shaped, and then assembled. Students will be evaluated based upon success of weekly field study research assignments and a final exam. Major requirement; ID majors only Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.
  18. This course gives the student a hands-on opportunity to develop design skills through the interaction with industrial materials that have strictly defined properties. Experimenting with these materials and the processes by which they are manipulated and formed promotes innovative thinking, problem solving and idea development. Students will achieve a more precise, professional and sensitive approach to design while broadening their technical skill base. Major requirement; ID majors only Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.
  19. The objective of this course is to develop a more precise, professional and sensitive approach to design while broadening the student's technical base. Precision machine tools such as metal lathes, millers and grinders will be introduced. Logical design and set-up approaches will be discussed. Outside design work will be required with emphasis on engineering drawing and sequence of operations. There will be a strong emphasis on experimenting with the material in order to promote innovative thinking and problem solving. Major elective; ID majors only
  20. The professional internship provides valuable exposure to a professional setting, enabling students to better establish a career path and define practical aspirations. Internship proposals are carefully vetted to determine legitimacy and must meet the contact hour requirements listed in the RISD Course Announcement. Permission of Academic Advisor and Department Head is required.
  21. Juniors take two 3-credit Special Topic Design Studios in the Fall semester. Juniors choose one 3-credit option from the "Content" category such as Packaging, Typography, Play, or UI/UX, and the other option from the "Process" category such as Casting, Soft Goods or Prototyping. Students will gain multiple competencies by utilizing techniques and methodologies through practice and process. Each studio meets once per week. Major requirement; ID majors only Open to non-majors pending seat availability and permission of Department Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.
  22. In this course students will explore a series of UX and Design Research methods and processes that build towards a cohesive body of work on a specific topic area of their choosing. By exploring a variety of tools and methods, students will ultimately develop their own process that they can articulate throughout their work at RISD and beyond. In addition to exploring a diverse range of research methods, the class will read, write, and engage in discussion on texts related to research in the design space. Throughout, there will be an emphasis placed on professional practice, and developing skills that will be applicable in a professional setting. Practicing researchers and designers from a number of sectors will critique and evaluate students' projects throughout the course.
  23. Portables, Fixtures and Fasteners course will concentrate on developing the skills necessary for students to safely and properly use the portable tool's system in the graduate makers space in the MID Studio (CIT). Through a series of hands on demonstrations followed up by weekly assignments students will learn techniques and procedures that will complement and build upon the existing graduate making classes. Open to ID graduate students only.
  24. This class will cover basic camera optics and lighting techniques necessary to generate high quality digital images for either print or digital portfolio applications. The focus of the class is to master manual controls on the digital camera such as film and shutter speed settings in conjunction with aperture openings to obtain whatever the desired effect might be to best represent two and three-dimensional objects. Manipulation of natural and artificial lighting is the other main focus of the class. Students will learn the use of fill and bounce cards with sun, tungsten and strobe light sources. The emphasis will be on the strobe lighting studio where through a series of assignments students will learn direct, diffused reflected lighting techniques. Students will be required to participate in the final critique during the final week of the semester. Open to juniors and above.
  25. This workshop teaches the basics of Rhino and introduces students to 3D modeling through an "exploratory process." Recognizing that experts devise many approaches to surface modeling Rhino Workshop: Exploratory Learning for 3D modeling uses four discrete projects each with a specific set of commands and features that will be explored as students fulfill the project's design brief and discover their own operational style. This approach flips the classroom experience - students use tutorials as necessary to identify techniques for basic surface modeling. By the completion of the workshop, students will be able to use Rhino as a design tool in their own design process - using the software to simulate projects in 3 dimensions or exporting 3D files to 2D for presentation purposes. Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00 Open to sophomores and above. Open to non-majors by permission of Instructor.
  26. Philosophically, the ID Department believes that students become better designers when they have an intimate knowledge of a range of natural and synthetic materials. In this course, students will learn about the properties of natural wood and engineered wood-based materials, investigate the related technical processes, and evaluate how this information is both connected to and influenced by the design process. Students will work with materials directly and master skills needed to manipulate these materials. They will develop projects that allow them to engage in the design and development process, promote creativity, problem solving, and the correct use of materials. Facility procedures, safety, and care and use of tools and equipment will be stressed. Major requirement; ID majors only Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.
  27. This course will deal with advanced woodworking processes, including milling and machinery use, laminate and steam bending, plywood and veneer. Techniques in using natural and synthetic materials connected with furniture will be covered. Major elective; ID majors only

Wintersession 2022

  1. The purpose of the course is to introduce students to advanced CAD techniques while enhancing their design processes by utilizing additional CAD applications. Extending the department's CAD education from 'Designing with Solidworks,' several categories will be offered to explore further CAD applications including Rhino with plug-ins, Cinema 4D, MasterCAM with SolidWorks, unreal Engine, and more. The specific offerings vary year to year. Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00 Major requirement; ID majors only Open to junior and above
  2. The aim of the course is to open a window on the complex and multifaceted present design environment. A preliminary overview about the major historic design movements will be followed by an extensive description of the design's state of the art together with a spot on the latest trends. Students will be invited to think and tinker, learning how to approach a design project, how to formulate proper research questions and how to use analog and digital prototyping to experiment, validate and communicate their own ideas. They will also initiate a dialogue with forms, functions, and interactions, defining the borders of the design activity and the actual role of designers. The main goal of the course is to get students familiar with the design vocabulary and with the basic tools involved in design processes. Areas covered: Ideas and concepts creation, quantitative and qualitative research, sketch models making, digital fabrication, physical computing, project's narrative and storytelling. Graduate major requirement; ID majors only Registration of Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.
  3. In this product design studio, we will dissect an existing product, analyze a market segment, and redesign the product to fit the described market. The methodology used to complete this task will be accelerated, giving students an overview of a typical industrial design process. Students will be exposed to design drawing techniques, foam modeling methods, and the concept of designing for consumers.
  4. The objective of this course is to develop a more precise, professional and sensitive approach to design while broadening the student's technical base. Precision machine tools such as metal lathes, millers and grinders will be introduced. Logical design and set-up approaches will be discussed. Outside design work will be required with emphasis on engineering drawing and sequence of operations. There will be a strong emphasis on experimenting with the material in order to promote innovative thinking and problem solving. Major elective; ID majors only
  5. Postcoloniality focuses on the plurality of wisdoms and practices; this course aims to integrate decolonial design perspectives with their counterparts. The aim is not to dismiss one over the other, but to find value in both and to integrate the various elements into our daily practices. By creating a collective toolkit of resources, we will be able to interrogate the semantics of modern and traditional design methods. Epistemologies will be critiqued by learning through literature and linguistics (storytelling and communicating.); making with multiple methods (beading and weaving); and exploring examples of embodiment (emoting and stretching). This is not an exhaustive list. Throughout this process, we will develop our self-awareness by articulating and reflecting on our emotions, stories, and wisdoms using a range of techniques. The pluriverse, as defined by Arturo Escobar in Design for the Pluriverse, will be called upon as we become autonomous designers who think critically about traditional Western universalism in design and become open to the plurality of thought and creation beyond it. At the end, we will design and develop artifacts or experiences that integrate all of these elements. Every step will be reflected in our personal journals. Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00
  6. This course is for industrial design graduate students in their final year to work independently on their graduate thesis. The instructor serves an advisory and support role in all projects. Students must submit for instructor agreement, a written proposal for work planned and the criteria for evaluation. Course meetings are arranged individually, and / or with the group as needed. Graduate major elective; ID graduate thesis students only Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.
  7. Currently U/I - U/X interfaces are applied towards several digital graphic formats: smart phone ios/Android, tablet/watch, Windows OS/Mac OS, or custom sized interfaces for products like ATM machines or car dashboards. The instructors professional design practice currently focuses on UI/UX design and future forecasting towards corporate strategies to best take advantage of the digital transformation many large corporations are being faced with at this time. Students learn methodologies and tools around smart phone app design development. Areas of design process include: research and app concept definition; conduct low-fidelity brainstorming and exploration around the users; develop the look, navigation and branding of the app; and at the end build high-fidelity prototypes incorporating app navigation interaction. No prior knowledge of UI/UX development is required. Students build working prototypes of cellular interface that functions and navigates. Coding experience is not necessary for this course and will not be taught. Students that have coding experience that may use those skills for app prototypes developed along with Adobe XD, Photoshop and Illustrator. Requirements: Adobe Creative Suit and the Adobe Cloud
  8. This course will deal with advanced woodworking processes, including milling and machinery use, laminate and steam bending, plywood and veneer. Techniques in using natural and synthetic materials connected with furniture will be covered. Major elective; ID majors only

Spring 2022

  1. The purpose of the course is to introduce students to advanced CAD techniques while enhancing their design processes by utilizing additional CAD applications. Extending the department's CAD education from 'Designing with Solidworks,' several categories will be offered to explore further CAD applications including Rhino with plug-ins, Cinema 4D, MasterCAM with SolidWorks, unreal Engine, and more. The specific offerings vary year to year. Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00 Major requirement; ID majors only Open to junior and above
  2. The 6-credit Advanced Design studios offer second semester juniors and seniors the opportunity to investigate product, socially responsible, and sustainable design; innovation through science and technology and other topics in contemporary practice. These studios are designed to strengthen the student's ability to conduct research, ideation, material exploration, presentation, and concept validation. Studios meet two days per week. ID juniors and seniors are required to take a total of three advanced studios. Major requirement; ID majors only Open to non-majors pending seat availability and permission of Department. Registration of Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.
  3. Turning an idea into a sustainable reality requires a fundamental understanding of business, but the frameworks that guide business principles overlap, complement, and enhance design principles. This course seeks to educate students to understand business as a critical design factor- a defining constraint or liberating perspective along the same lines that other design principles are taught. The guiding principle is that design and business are inextricably linked: Design work is intrinsically linked to business and will always be at the service of business, fulfilling the need for an enterprise (profit or non-profit) whose business model is critical to its survival. Design will find new channels, new outlets, through a more complete understanding of business needs and how businesses see opportunity. Design can and should be considered as critical strategic input for business. The objective of Business Principles: Design and Entrepreneurship is for students to understand basic business vocabulary, to explore how design vocabulary and design processes overlap, complement and enhance business vocabulary, and to understand how design thinking skills can be used to identify and execute business opportunities. Major elective; ID majors only
  4. This course is a continuation of Design Principles (ID-2464) with an emphasis on problem solving and design process and skills. Major requirement; ID majors only Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.
  5. Can the design practice benefit from a contemplative practice like mindfulness? What happens when designers include a mindful approach within their practice? Mindfulness meditation originated thousands of years ago and yet has become a daily part of the lives of millions worldwide while the design profession is responsible for reshaping how we relate to our world It seems natural that these two major influences converge to the potential benefit of both. As designers tackle ever more complex societal challenges while seeking ways to became more empathetic and more ethical can these efforts be empowered by an integration of design thinking and mindfulness? Using first-person methods to explore these ideas while considering the effect designers have on culture, society, and the ecology. Through hands-on investigation we will explore how changes to our approach may improve the quality of our impact on humanity and the environment. While practicing mindfulness inspired activities designed to enhance one's receptivity to insight during ideation and conceptual development as well as practice ways to design objects/experiences that inspire wonder and joy in the audience. Course work will involve readings, writing, group discussions, and concept development, and there will be guest lectures, and field trips. The course will include a combination of individual and group work as well as elements of design drawing practice and board game development. Open to seniors and graduate level students in Industrial Design only.
  6. The purpose of this course is to expose students to SolidWorks, a widely used solid modeling software program. Students will learn how to translate their hand-sketches into three-dimensional CAD models. Lectures and assignments will focus on the development of form as it applies to plastic part design and assembly. Physical models will be realized through ABS rapid prototyping allowing students to experience true plastic part design. Students should anticipate additional costs for supplies and materials. Major requirement; ID majors only Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.
  7. Graduate Communication Introduction is a studio course about writing and speaking as design tools. We think about writing and speaking in two ways. First as a communication tool and second as a design tool. On the communication side, we address the many ways that writing and speaking surrounds a designed object (as a proposal, as sales copy, as instructions to users, as specs for manufacture, as criticism, etc.). We think about the audiences for those various kinds of communication and how to think about what they want and need. We look at examples of great design communication and we develop and practice our own skills for succinctly explaining our ideas. On the design tool side, we think about the many ways that writing can help clarify and quickly test out ideas. We think about writing as a form of rapid prototyping alongside sketching, model making, etc. We talk about what writing is good at, when other methods might be more useful, and when to combine methods. We explore techniques such as design fiction, scenario planning, and other narrative methodologies that are used in industrial design and related fields. Graduate major requirement; ID majors only Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.
  8. This required studio continues the explorations you began in Graduate Studio One. Again, you are challenged through a series of projects to purposefully locate your personal position within contemporary industrial design practice. The projects will introduce you to a variety of issues, application methodologies and audiences associated with the "industrial design" process that will equip you with a critical understanding of the field that can direct a practical means of applying your ideas. At the end of the semester, your deliverable is an exhibition piece resulting from a final self-directed project. This concluding project is a personal, insightful and original synthesis of your semester's activities and clearly communicates your maturity in problem solving design approaches. Graduate Studio Two is offered as part of the Graduate Industrial Design core curriculum in conjunction the required Graduate Shop Orientation and Graduate Communications courses. Graduate major requirement; ID majors only Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.
  9. Graduate Thesis Communications II is a studio course run in parallel with our sibling studio course which focuses on completing your thesis. Together, we will spend the spring semester finishing the thesis and thesis book that you proposed at the end of Graduate Thesis Communications I. We continue to think about writing as a design tool and as a communication tool. For this course, we put more emphasis on the communication aspect. Together, we will continue to refine and strengthen the manner by which you explain your thesis to yourself and others. We will think about audience, voice, structure, and form. We will explore different ways of communicating the same idea in different contexts and mediums (visual, oral, written). We will examine how to share our work and with whom. At the end of the course, you will have a complete thesis. Major requirement, ID graduate students only Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.
  10. This course concludes the Graduate Thesis through iterative prototyping, application and verification that positions and delivers a human-centered, discpline-engaging proposal that will be communicated through an exhibition format, product, product prototype and a final Graduate Thesis document. Graduate major requirement; ID majors only Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.
  11. History is a powerful tool; a basic understanding of the history of design and familiarity with important design movements and designers is essential for thorough design work. By examining the work of other designers, we are better able to identify our own interests and concerns, and avoid repeating mistakes that have been navigated in the past. This lecture-based class will present the history of Industrial Design in a way that links it to today's studio work, and offers connection points to link past innovation and design activity with future design success. The lectures present a chronological overview of the profession of Industrial Design and its antecedents. Topics discussed will include major design movements, significant designers, manufacturers, and design-related companies, innovations in technology and material use, the development of sales, marketing, and user-focused designing, and the history of design process. Coursework includes extensive reading, in-class presentations based on independent research, projects, and writing. Major requirement; ID majors Registration of Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration. Liberal Arts elective credit for non-majors pending seat availability.
  12. This course will acclimate new graduate students to the shop environment of the Industrial Design Department. The Metal, Wood and Model Shops are invaluable resources, clarifying pragmatic aspects of the design process from general feasibility of manufacturing to the challenges of translating concepts into tangible objects. This course covers excerpted information from both undergraduate courses Wood I and Metals I and emphasizes safety in the utilization of shop facilities. Graduate major requirement; ID majors only Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.
  13. This course introduces the students to methods, materials, and manufacturing processes that translate design activity into finished goods. A significant portion of downstream design activity is devoted to manufacturing issues - the techniques by which materials are selected, shaped, and then assembled. Students will be evaluated based upon success of weekly field study research assignments and a final exam. Major requirement; ID majors only Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.
  14. This course gives the student a hands-on opportunity to develop design skills through the interaction with industrial materials that have strictly defined properties. Experimenting with these materials and the processes by which they are manipulated and formed promotes innovative thinking, problem solving and idea development. Students will achieve a more precise, professional and sensitive approach to design while broadening their technical skill base. Major requirement; ID majors only Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.
  15. The objective of this course is to develop a more precise, professional and sensitive approach to design while broadening the student's technical base. Precision machine tools such as metal lathes, millers and grinders will be introduced. Logical design and set-up approaches will be discussed. Outside design work will be required with emphasis on engineering drawing and sequence of operations. There will be a strong emphasis on experimenting with the material in order to promote innovative thinking and problem solving. Major elective; ID majors only
  16. In this hands-on course, students will learn the basics of Processing, an open-source coding language that combines computer programming with form, motion and interaction. Students will learn the fundamentals of Processing to create interactive graphics and visualize data in a collaborative workshop setting. By the end of the four-week module, students will have learned to design, implement, and trouble-shoot their code, providing a solid foundation that will allow them to continue their learning after the class ends. Students will be required to participate in the "laptop farm" group exhibition on the final day of the semester. Open to juniors and above.
  17. This workshop teaches the basics of Rhino and introduces students to 3D modeling through an "exploratory process." Recognizing that experts devise many approaches to surface modeling Rhino Workshop: Exploratory Learning for 3D modeling uses four discrete projects each with a specific set of commands and features that will be explored as students fulfill the project's design brief and discover their own operational style. This approach flips the classroom experience - students use tutorials as necessary to identify techniques for basic surface modeling. By the completion of the workshop, students will be able to use Rhino as a design tool in their own design process - using the software to simulate projects in 3 dimensions or exporting 3D files to 2D for presentation purposes. Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00 Open to sophomores and above. Open to non-majors by permission of Instructor.
  18. Philosophically, the ID Department believes that students become better designers when they have an intimate knowledge of a range of natural and synthetic materials. In this course, students will learn about the properties of natural wood and engineered wood-based materials, investigate the related technical processes, and evaluate how this information is both connected to and influenced by the design process. Students will work with materials directly and master skills needed to manipulate these materials. They will develop projects that allow them to engage in the design and development process, promote creativity, problem solving, and the correct use of materials. Facility procedures, safety, and care and use of tools and equipment will be stressed. Major requirement; ID majors only Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.
  19. This course will deal with advanced woodworking processes, including milling and machinery use, laminate and steam bending, plywood and veneer. Techniques in using natural and synthetic materials connected with furniture will be covered. Major elective; ID majors only