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Fall 2019

  1. Advanced CAD

    The purpose of the course is to introduce students to advanced CAD techniques while enhancing their design processes by utilizing additional CAD applications. Extending the department's CAD education from 'Designing with Solidworks,' several categories will be offered to explore further CAD applications including Rhino with plug-ins, Cinema 4D, MasterCAM with SolidWorks, unreal Engine, and more. The specific offerings vary year to year.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00

    Major requirement; ID majors only

    Open to junior and above

  2. Advanced Design: Studio

    The 6-credit Advanced Design studios offer second semester juniors and seniors the opportunity to investigate product, socially responsible, and sustainable design; innovation through science and technology and other topics in contemporary practice. These studios are designed to strengthen the student's ability to conduct research, ideation, material exploration, presentation, and concept validation. Studios meet two days per week.

    ID juniors and seniors are required to take a total of three advanced studios.

    Major requirement; ID majors only

    Open to non-majors pending seat availability and permission of Department.

    Registration of Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.

  3. Brown Univ. Prof. Elective

  4. Collaborative Study

    A Collaborative Study Project (CSP) allows a team of students to work collaboratively to complete a faculty supervised project of independent study.

    Usually, a CSP is supervised by two faculty members, but with approval it may be supervised by one faculty member. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses, though it is not a substitute for a course if that course is regularly offered.

    Permission of Academic Advisor and Department Head is required in advance of posted Registrar's deadline.

    GPA of 3.0 or higher is required.

    Register by completing the Collaborative Study Application available on the Registrar's website.

  5. Design For Impact

    Design for Impact addresses the global problems faced by our ineffectual production and consumption practices. Particular attention is placed on constraints faced when designing for underserved communities, with a focus on experimentation, synthesis and measuring impact. Students will work on semester-long projects, and draw on knowledge from community partners, field practitioners, and experts in relevant fields. Topics covered include participatory design for affordability and sustainability, and strategies that benefit the preservation of landscapes, biodiversity and livelihoods that are increasingly vulnerable.

    Open to ID majors only; juniors and above.

    Open to non-majors pending seat availability and permission of Instructor.

  6. Design Principles I

    This course is an introduction to conceptual and manual skills that represent necessary steps in design evolution. Students strengthen skills by completion of several processes and exercises. Critical thinking and concept generation is a primary focus, drawing and model making activities help to establish this process. Throughout the course each student will focus on improving communication skills and the ability to project or sell ideas.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $15.00

    Major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.

  7. Disruptive Creativity

    Using diverse, unexpected and unusual precedents, the class will look critically at the tools used/made/appropriated to change the world. The course aims to help students understand the conscious and unconscious ways they participate in and reproduce structures of power - and the disruptive opportunities for creativity to both perpetuate and problematize our realities. We will use discussion, research, assigned reading and other media to better understand and practice systemic thinking and attention to unintended consequences when designing or using these tools to instigate change. In this vein, students will be guided through impact mapping with a particular focus to the structural constraints imposed by legal and human rights frameworks. Students will be challenged to continuously put methods into practice through ideation sketching and using quick conceptual design proposals as a reflective tool, and as a response to case studies.

    Open to ID Graduate Students only.

  8. EHP Fall: Studio Concentratio

    In this intensive independent studio students continue and complete the work began in "EHP Studio Elective", culminating in the final exhibition and review. It corresponds to the remaining four weeks of the program, after students have finished with their Art History and Italian classes.

    Note: EHP credits replace the on-campus major requirements for the term students attend. Distribution to non-major requirements occurs when major credits are not needed.

  9. EHP Studio Elective

    Independent studio is at the core of the EHP experience. Upon arrival, students are assigned studio space at the Palazzetto Cenci, home of RISD's program in Rome. With guidance from the chief critic, each student develops a personal body of work sparked by his/her interactions with places, people and circumstances in Rome and other locations that are part of the EHP tours (such as the Northern, Southern or Eastern tours, as well as other shorter trips.) The work takes as a point of departure knowledge and techniques specific to individual home departments, but allows, and even encourages, explorations beyond disciplinary boundaries, including collaborations and cross-fertilization within a group of students from different departments working together.

    Beyond consistent and thorough engagement with studio work, requirements include participation in open studios and exhibitions, presentations in reviews, and attendance to all group activities and events, such as lectures at the Cenci and other institutions. From time to time, the chief critic may issue short assignments to introduce or focus on a particular subject. As part of the studio elective, students may be encouraged to keep sketchbooks and/or diaries, participate in optional activities--such as figure drawing sessions--and search for brief internships, apprenticeships, or other forms of interactions with local artists, designers, curators and critics.

    EHP Studio Elective corresponds to the first twelve weeks of the program, while students are also taking Art History and Italian classes. This course establishes the direction for the work in the "Studio Concentration" course that follows.

    Note: EHP credits replace the on-campus major requirements for the term students attend. Distribution to non-major requirements occurs when major credits are not needed.

  10. Graduate Communication Introduction

    Graduate Communication Introduction is a studio course about writing and speaking as design tools. We think about writing and speaking in two ways. First as a communication tool and second as a design tool.

    On the communication side, we adress the many ways that writing and speaking surrounds a designed object (as a proposal, as sales copy, as instructions to users, as specs for manufacture, as criticism, etc.). We think about the audiences for those various kinds of communication and how to think about what they want and need. We look at examples of great design communication and we develop and practice our own skills for succinctly explaining our ideas.

    On the design tool side, we think about the many ways that writing can help clarify and quickly test out ideas. We think about writing as a form of rapid prototyping alongside sketching, model making, etc. We talk about what writing is good at, when other methods might be more useful, and when to combine methods. We explore techniques such as design fiction, scenario planning, and other narrative methodologies that are used in industrial design and related fields.

    Graduate major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.

  11. Graduate ID Studio I

    The execution of two assigned design projects provides the framework for a thorough examination of the design process. This structured and intensive studio will focus on the relationship between the implementation of sound design methodologies and successful problem solving in the design process. This first studio experience is intended to provide the methodological infrastructure for the remainder of the M.I.D. thesis experience.

    Graduate major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.

  12. Graduate Thesis Communications I

    Graduate Thesis Communications I is a studio course run in parallel with our sibling studio course which focuses on design research methods. Together, we will spend the fall semester casting about, planning and prototyping towards some kind of design proposal or product for execution in the spring. We think about writing in two ways. First as a design tool and second as a communication tool. On the tool for design side, we think about the many ways that writing can help clarify and quickly test out ideas. We think about writing as a form of rapid prototyping alongside sketching, model making, etc. We talk about what writing is good at, when other methods might be more useful, and when to combine methods. We use writing to help clarify and crystalize the thesis plan. On the communication side, we think about the many ways that writing surrounds a designed object (as a proposal, as sales copy, as instructions to users, as specs for manufacture, as criticism, etc.). We think about the audiences for those various kinds of writing and how to think about what they want and need. We talk about the thesis as a tool for explaining the design but also as a tool for helping you advance your career goals. At the end of the course, you will have a partially complete draft of your thesis. which will set you up for an excellent spring.

    Graduate major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.

  13. Graduate Thesis Research

    This course introduces the Graduate Thesis project starting with the development of a research question through secondary research reading methods. This question has its assumptions articulated and verified through experimental making and primary research methods that engage specific audiences for qualitative discourse.

    Graduate major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.

  14. ID Graduate Shop Orientation

    This course will acclimate new graduate students to the shop environment of the Industrial Design Department. The Metal, Wood and Model Shops are invaluable resources, clarifying pragmatic aspects of the design process from general feasibility of manufacturing to the challenges of translating concepts into tangible objects. This course covers excerpted information from both undergraduate courses Wood I and Metals I and emphasizes safety in the utilization of shop facilities.

    Graduate major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.

  15. ISP Major

    The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses.

    Permission of Academic Advisor and Department Head is required in advance of posted Registrar's deadline.

    GPA of 3.0 or higher is required.

    Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website.

  16. ISP Non-major Elective

    The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses.

    Permission of Instructor and GPA of 3.0 or higher is required.

    Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; the course is not available via web registration.

  17. Introduction To Basic Shoemaking

    You will be introduced to the fundamentals of footwear design and construction based on two different shoe styles: pump/court/slip-on and derby. During that first project you will develop skills for working with a last, pattern making, sewing, construction and finishing techniques. These skills will be applied to a second project of your own choosing and design. You will gain general understanding of the parameters of the last and its correlation to feet and pattern-making. You will gain general understanding of footwear production. From Sketching demo to Spec Specification Sheet Overview to different construction techniques applied. You will acquire a general understanding of footwear construction and terminology. You will learn basic pattern making skills and how to develop your own ideas/styles using the skills acquired. You will acquire skills necessary to work with the tools/machines on hand (knives, sewing machine, lasting pliers etc.) You will develop the skills necessary for constructing basic cemented footwear from start to finish, applying it to different styles. You will learn about materials used in shoemaking, in particular leather, but also alternative materials. For the second half of the semester (final project) you will apply and experiment using techniques/skills learned on a style of your choosing, incorporating your personal skill set to design and build your own unique footwear project (either a pair or two singles).

    Open to Industrial Design majors only; juniors and above.

    Also offered as APPAR-2494 for Apparel Design majors; juniors and above.

    FALL 2019 ONLY: Section 02 is restricted to ID majors only; open to non-majors pending seat availability and permission of Instructor.

  18. Manufacturing Techniques

    This course introduces the students to methods, materials, and manufacturing processes that translate design activity into finished goods. A significant portion of downstream design activity is devoted to manufacturing issues - the techniques by which materials are selected, shaped, and then assembled. Students will be evaluated based upon success of weekly field study research assignments and a final exam.

    Major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.

  19. Metal I

    This course gives the student a hands-on opportunity to develop design skills through the interaction with industrial materials that have strictly defined properties. Experimenting with these materials and the processes by which they are manipulated and formed promotes innovative thinking, problem solving and idea development. Students will achieve a more precise, professional and sensitive approach to design while broadening their technical skill base.

    Major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.

  20. Metal II

    The objective of this course is to develop a more precise, professional and sensitive approach to design while broadening the student's technical base. Precision machine tools such as metal lathes, millers and grinders will be introduced. Logical design and set-up approaches will be discussed. Outside design work will be required with emphasis on engineering drawing and sequence of operations. There will be a strong emphasis on experimenting with the material in order to promote innovative thinking and problem solving.

    Major elective; ID majors only

  21. Professional Internship

    The professional internship provides valuable exposure to a professional setting, enabling students to better establish a career path and define practical aspirations. Internship proposals are carefully vetted to determine legitimacy and must meet the contact hour requirements listed in the RISD Course Announcement.

    Permission of Academic Advisor and Department Head is required.

  22. Special Topic Design Studio

    Juniors take two 3-credit Special Topic Design Studios in the Fall semester. Juniors choose one 3-credit option from the "Content" category such as Packaging, Typography, Play, or UI/UX, and the other option from the "Process" category such as Casting, Soft Goods or Prototyping. Students will gain multiple competencies by utilizing techniques and methodologies through practice and process. Each studio meets once per week.

    Major requirement; ID majors only

    Open to non-majors pending seat availability and permission of Department

    Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.

  23. Wkshp: Product Photography

    This class will cover basic camera optics and lighting techniques necessary to generate high quality digital images for either print or digital portfolio applications. The focus of the class is to master manual controls on the digital camera such as film and shutter speed settings in conjunction with aperture openings to obtain whatever the desired effect might be to best represent two and three-dimensional objects. Manipulation of natural and artificial lighting is the other main focus of the class. Students will learn the use of fill and bounce cards with sun, tungsten and strobe light sources. The emphasis will be on the strobe lighting studio where through a series of assignments students will learn direct, diffused reflected lighting techniques.

    Students will be required to participate in the final critique during the final week of the semester.

    Open to juniors and above.

  24. Wkshp: Rhino: Exploratory Learning For 3d Modeling

    This workshop teaches the basics of Rhino and introduces students to 3D modeling through an "exploratory process." Recognizing that experts devise many approaches to surface modeling Rhino Workshop: Exploratory Learning for 3D modeling uses four discrete projects each with a specific set of commands and features that will be explored as students fulfill the project's design brief and discover their own operational style. This approach flips the classroom experience - students use tutorials as necessary to identify techniques for basic surface modeling.

    By the completion of the workshop, students will be able to use Rhino as a design tool in their own design process - using the software to simulate projects in 3 dimensions or exporting 3D files to 2D for presentation purposes.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00

    Open to sophomores and above.

    Open to non-majors by permission of Instructor.

  25. Wood I

    Philosophically, the ID Department believes that students become better designers when they have an intimate knowledge of a range of natural and synthetic materials. In this course, students will learn about the properties of natural wood and engineered wood-based materials, investigate the related technical processes, and evaluate how this information is both connected to and influenced by the design process. Students will work with materials directly and master skills needed to manipulate these materials. They will develop projects that allow them to engage in the design and development process, promote creativity, problem solving, and the correct use of materials. Facility procedures, safety, and care and use of tools and equipment will be stressed.

    Major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.

  26. Wood II

    This course will deal with advanced woodworking processes, including milling and machinery use, laminate and steam bending, plywood and veneer. Techniques in using natural and synthetic materials connected with furniture will be covered.

    Major elective; ID majors only

Wintersession 2020

  1. Advanced CAD

    The purpose of the course is to introduce students to advanced CAD techniques while enhancing their design processes by utilizing additional CAD applications. Extending the department's CAD education from 'Designing with Solidworks,' several categories will be offered to explore further CAD applications including Rhino with plug-ins, Cinema 4D, MasterCAM with SolidWorks, unreal Engine, and more. The specific offerings vary year to year.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00

    Major requirement; ID majors only

    Open to junior and above

  2. Designing For Life Off Planet

    The strive to venture away from our terrestrial home into the vast unknowns of the universe is an ongoing endeavour. But in order to survive away from planet earth all aspects of life have to be considered and designed. Everything on board such as clothing, toilets, food, and even air have to be carefully constructed and maintained.

    In this studio we will use speculative and critical design methods to explore the complex possibilities associated with maintaining life off planet Earth. The course will involve prototyping for survival in extreme environments and reimagining domestic life with the constraints of advancing knowledge in space. We will create diegetic prototypes which extrapolate from current scientific advances and design problems experienced in current space missions to design for the future ephemera of space travel.

    This course will be split into two short briefs and one longer project exploring different facets of design for survival in long term missions. The final deliverables will be a portfolio of objects that together might indicate what kind of world we want to create for ourselves away from the blue and green dot we call home.

    Open to seniors and graduate students.

  3. Grad Intro To Industrial Design

    The aim of the course is to open a window on the complex and multifaceted present design environment. A preliminary overview about the major historic design movements will be followed by an extensive description of the design's state of the art together with a spot on the latest trends. Students will be invited to think and tinker, learning how to approach a design project, how to formulate proper research questions and how to use analog and digital prototyping to experiment, validate and communicate their own ideas. They will also initiate a dialogue with forms, functions, and interactions, defining the borders of the design activity and the actual role of designers. The main goal of the course is to get students familiar with the design vocabulary and with the basic tools involved in design processes.

    Areas covered: Ideas and concepts creation, quantitative and qualitative research, sketch models making, digital fabrication, physical computing, project's narrative and storytelling.

    Graduate major requirement; ID majors only
    Registration of Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.

  4. ISP Major

    The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses.

    Permission of Academic Advisor and Department Head is required in advance of posted Registrar's deadline.

    GPA of 3.0 or higher is required.

    Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website.

  5. Intro To Industrial Design

    In this product design studio, we will dissect an existing product, analyze a market segment, and redesign the product to fit the described market. The methodology used to complete this task will be accelerated, giving students an overview of a typical industrial design process. Students will be exposed to design drawing techniques, foam modeling methods, and the concept of designing for consumers.

  6. Introduction To Game Design & Development

    Play is a foundational component of the human experience. Games, or rule-based play, have never been more popular, commercially successful, or culturally important than today. From soccer to poker to World of Warcraft, games captivate and stimulate the body and mind. Learning how games work and how to make them provides a solid understanding of dynamic interactive systems. This class will focus on paper prototyping and physical game development. We will examine the rules and play of board games, card games, sports, and digital games. Students will gain an understanding of the game development process with a focus on prototyping and play-testing in an iterative loop. The art, design, and craft of making games can be applied to a broad range of fields including service, experience, graphic, interactive, and urban design. This class will establish a basic level of competency for beginners while providing a platform for more complicated projects (including digital games) for those with more experience.

  7. Metal II

    The objective of this course is to develop a more precise, professional and sensitive approach to design while broadening the student's technical base. Precision machine tools such as metal lathes, millers and grinders will be introduced. Logical design and set-up approaches will be discussed. Outside design work will be required with emphasis on engineering drawing and sequence of operations. There will be a strong emphasis on experimenting with the material in order to promote innovative thinking and problem solving.

    Major elective; ID majors only

  8. Thesis Open Research

    This course is for industrial design graduate students in their final year to work independently on their graduate thesis. The instructor serves an advisory and support role in all projects. Students must submit for instructor agreement, a written proposal for work planned and the criteria for evaluation. Course meetings are arranged individually, and / or with the group as needed.

    Graduate major elective; ID graduate thesis students only

    Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.

  9. Toy Design: Playing With Purpose. Designing Kids Toys For Social Justice

    The toy industry is a $27 billion dollar industry  and is a creative field that hires professionals f rom many or our disciplines:  Industrial, Product, and Furniture DesignerS, Illu strators, Sculptors, Model makers, Animators, and  Engineers to name a few.   Toys are tools for learning and understanding the  world around you. It is how kids learn to socializ e and think constructively.  They help kids develop motor skills, communicate,  focus, learn, role play, facilitate interactions,  learn conflict resolution, be active, discover the  world around them, understand the adult world, em ulate careers.  However,  we are in a crisis of childhood developm ent within the industry. Kids have changed, parent s have changed and society has changed and we are  at a crossroads.  As more and more kids are on screens solo and play ing video games they exist in more phygital (physi cal +digital) spaces, parents and families look ve ry different from the past norms and the social an d political  commentary has affected what parents want and expe ct from their purchases. In this hands on class, we will examine the histor y of toy design, look at various trends of 2019/20 20, examine today's kids, and look at social justi ce topics to find the best design solutions.  By i mmersing ourselves in a maker space, we will utili ze the full resources and ethos of the Co-Works Re search laboratory.

  10. Ui/ux Design

    Emerging web interfaces have grown towards several platforms, such as: smart phones, tablets, Windows OS, Mac OS. As of last year, Adobe released software that offers designers a new interface especially geared towards app and web design for several platforms in the same file. This allows designers to build web experiences for different user interfaces more easily, and with more consistency.

    Students will learn to work with Adobe XD. The software has two modes: a "design" mode to build graphic elements tailored towards web graphics, and a "prototype" mode that prototypes the navigation interface through an app or web site. By learning Adobe XD, students will be able to build working prototypes of a web interface that functions and navigates, without requiring knowledge of coding.

    During the course students design and develop a user interface of their choosing. By the end of the course, students will have a complete set of user interfaces for at least two platforms (smart phone & web browser). Prototypes can be viewed on phones and internet browsers.

    The instructor has professional experience designing software and user interfaces. With the use of new Adobe XD software behind the production of user interfaces, students will get more power and capabilities towards their work than with past UI/UX design tools.

  11. Wood II

    This course will deal with advanced woodworking processes, including milling and machinery use, laminate and steam bending, plywood and veneer. Techniques in using natural and synthetic materials connected with furniture will be covered.

    Major elective; ID majors only

Spring 2020

  1. Advanced CAD

    The purpose of the course is to introduce students to advanced CAD techniques while enhancing their design processes by utilizing additional CAD applications. Extending the department's CAD education from 'Designing with Solidworks,' several categories will be offered to explore further CAD applications including Rhino with plug-ins, Cinema 4D, MasterCAM with SolidWorks, unreal Engine, and more. The specific offerings vary year to year.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00

    Major requirement; ID majors only

    Open to junior and above

  2. Advanced Design: Studio

    The 6-credit Advanced Design studios offer second semester juniors and seniors the opportunity to investigate product, socially responsible, and sustainable design; innovation through science and technology and other topics in contemporary practice. These studios are designed to strengthen the student's ability to conduct research, ideation, material exploration, presentation, and concept validation. Studios meet two days per week.

    ID juniors and seniors are required to take a total of three advanced studios.

    Major requirement; ID majors only

    Open to non-majors pending seat availability and permission of Department.

    Registration of Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.

  3. Business Principles: Design and Entrepreneurship

    Turning an idea into a sustainable reality requires a fundamental understanding of business, but the frameworks that guide business principles overlap, complement, and enhance design principles.

    This course seeks to educate students to understand business as a critical design factor- a defining constraint or liberating perspective along the same lines that other design principles are taught.

    The guiding principle is that design and business are inextricably linked: Design work is intrinsically linked to business and will always be at the service of business, fulfilling the need for an enterprise (profit or non-profit) whose business model is critical to its survival. Design will find new channels, new outlets, through a more complete understanding of business needs and how businesses see opportunity. Design can and should be considered as critical strategic input for business.

    The objective of Business Principles: Design and Entrepreneurship is for students to understand basic business vocabulary, to explore how design vocabulary and design processes overlap, complement and enhance business vocabulary, and to understand how design thinking skills can be used to identify and execute business opportunities.

    Major elective; ID majors only

  4. Design Principles II

    This course is a continuation of Design Principles (ID-2464) with an emphasis on problem solving and design process and skills.

    Major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.

  5. Designing With Solidworks

    The purpose of this course is to expose students to SolidWorks, a widely used solid modeling software program. Students will learn how to translate their hand-sketches into three-dimensional CAD models. Lectures and assignments will focus on the development of form as it applies to plastic part design and assembly. Physical models will be realized through ABS rapid prototyping allowing students to experience true plastic part design.

    Students should anticipate additional costs for supplies and materials.

    Major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.

  6. Graduate Communication Introduction

    Graduate Communication Introduction is a studio course about writing and speaking as design tools. We think about writing and speaking in two ways. First as a communication tool and second as a design tool.

    On the communication side, we adress the many ways that writing and speaking surrounds a designed object (as a proposal, as sales copy, as instructions to users, as specs for manufacture, as criticism, etc.). We think about the audiences for those various kinds of communication and how to think about what they want and need. We look at examples of great design communication and we develop and practice our own skills for succinctly explaining our ideas.

    On the design tool side, we think about the many ways that writing can help clarify and quickly test out ideas. We think about writing as a form of rapid prototyping alongside sketching, model making, etc. We talk about what writing is good at, when other methods might be more useful, and when to combine methods. We explore techniques such as design fiction, scenario planning, and other narrative methodologies that are used in industrial design and related fields.

    Graduate major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.

  7. Graduate ID Studio II

    This required studio continues the explorations you began in Graduate Studio One. Again, you are challenged through a series of projects to purposefully locate your personal position within contemporary industrial design practice. The projects will introduce you to a variety of issues, application methodologies and audiences associated with the "industrial design" process that will equip you with a critical understanding of the field that can direct a practical means of applying your ideas. At the end of the semester, your deliverable is an exhibition piece resulting from a final self-directed project. This concluding project is a personal, insightful and original synthesis of your semester's activities and clearly communicates your maturity in problem solving design approaches. Graduate Studio Two is offered as part of the Graduate Industrial Design core curriculum in conjunction the required Graduate Shop Orientation and Graduate Communications courses.

    Graduate major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.

  8. Graduate Thesis Communications II

    Graduate Thesis Communications II is a studio course run in parallel with our sibling studio course which focuses on completing your thesis. Together, we will spend the spring semester finishing the thesis and thesis book that you proposed at the end of Graduate Thesis Communications I. We continue to think about writing as a design tool and as a communication tool. For this course, we put more emphasis on the communication aspect. Together, we will continue to refine and strengthen the manner by which you explain your thesis to yourself and others. We will think about audience, voice, structure, and form. We will explore different ways of communicating the same idea in different contexts and mediums (visual, oral, written). We will examine how to share our work and with whom. At the end of the course, you will have a complete thesis.

    Major requirement, ID graduate students only Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.

  9. Graduate Thesis Making

    This course concludes the Graduate Thesis through iterative prototyping, application and verification that positions and delivers a human-centered, discpline-engaging proposal that will be communicated through an exhibition format, product, product prototype and a final Graduate Thesis document.

    Graduate major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.

  10. History Of Industrial Design

    History is a powerful tool; a basic understanding of the history of design and familiarity with important design movements and designers is essential for thorough design work. By examining the work of other designers, we are better able to identify our own interests and concerns, and avoid repeating mistakes that have been navigated in the past. This lecture-based class will present the history of Industrial Design in a way that links it to today's studio work, and offers connection points to link past innovation and design activity with future design success. The lectures present a chronological overview of the profession of Industrial Design and its antecedents. Topics discussed will include major design movements, significant designers, manufacturers, and design-related companies, innovations in technology and material use, the development of sales, marketing, and user-focused designing, and the history of design process. Coursework includes extensive reading, in-class presentations based on independent research, projects, and writing.

    Major requirement; ID majors

    Registration of Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.
    Liberal Arts elective credit for non-majors pending seat availability.

  11. ID Graduate Shop Orientation

    This course will acclimate new graduate students to the shop environment of the Industrial Design Department. The Metal, Wood and Model Shops are invaluable resources, clarifying pragmatic aspects of the design process from general feasibility of manufacturing to the challenges of translating concepts into tangible objects. This course covers excerpted information from both undergraduate courses Wood I and Metals I and emphasizes safety in the utilization of shop facilities.

    Graduate major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.

  12. Manufacturing Techniques

    This course introduces the students to methods, materials, and manufacturing processes that translate design activity into finished goods. A significant portion of downstream design activity is devoted to manufacturing issues - the techniques by which materials are selected, shaped, and then assembled. Students will be evaluated based upon success of weekly field study research assignments and a final exam.

    Major requirement; ID majors only

    Registration by Industrial Design Department, course not available via web registration.

  13. Metal II

    The objective of this course is to develop a more precise, professional and sensitive approach to design while broadening the student's technical base. Precision machine tools such as metal lathes, millers and grinders will be introduced. Logical design and set-up approaches will be discussed. Outside design work will be required with emphasis on engineering drawing and sequence of operations. There will be a strong emphasis on experimenting with the material in order to promote innovative thinking and problem solving.

    Major elective; ID majors only

  14. Tactical Electronics

    This course introduces students to the theory and practice of physical computing in the context of contemporary design. "Tactical Electronics" fosters experimentation and critical making with embedded and material digital technologies opening up the practice of design to the fields of contemporary art, DIY/craft and technological development. Students gain experience in designing and building electronics systems and objects capable of sensing and interacting with humans, the built environment and data networks. The class explores fundamental practices of interaction design including circuit design, basic to intermediate electronics, and programming for interactivity. Development with microcontrollers (small computers specifically designed to interact with the physical world) will be taught along with sensors capable of measuring motion, distance, biometrics, environmental variables and more. Open-source hardware(Arduino) and software (Processing) will be the main tools to create various prototypes and conduct experiments. The course is structured around a series of workshops and hands on assignments culminating in a final project specific to each student's research interests (robotics, wearables, e-textiles, installations, etc).

    Open to ID graduate students only.

  15. Wkshp: Drawing

    In this class we practice a variety of digital and freehand methods of design exploration and visual communication used by designers. These sketching and rendering skills are ideal for anyone who has to understand and resolve form while communicating ideas within interdisciplinary environments. We will focus on the redesign of a few objects, starting with some sketching from the ideation phase through to a final solution that describes the aesthetic and emotive intentions, as well as demonstrates knowledge of functional or unique manufacturing requirements. The class is built on the belief that strong two-dimensional skills remain the essential tool for product designers.

    Students attending the first module will be required to participate in the final critique on the final day of the semester.

    Open to juniors and above.

  16. Wkshp: Processing

    In this hands-on course, students will learn the basics of Processing, an open-source coding language that combines computer programming with form, motion and interaction. Students will learn the fundamentals of Processing to create interactive graphics and visualize data in a collaborative workshop setting. By the end of the four-week module, students will have learned to design, implement, and trouble-shoot their code, providing a solid foundation that will allow them to continue their learning after the class ends.

    Students will be required to participate in the "laptop farm" group exhibition on the final day of the semester.

    Open to juniors and above.

  17. Wkshp: Rhino: Exploratory Learning For 3d Modeling

    This workshop teaches the basics of Rhino and introduces students to 3D modeling through an "exploratory process." Recognizing that experts devise many approaches to surface modeling Rhino Workshop: Exploratory Learning for 3D modeling uses four discrete projects each with a specific set of commands and features that will be explored as students fulfill the project's design brief and discover their own operational style. This approach flips the classroom experience - students use tutorials as necessary to identify techniques for basic surface modeling.

    By the completion of the workshop, students will be able to use Rhino as a design tool in their own design process - using the software to simulate projects in 3 dimensions or exporting 3D files to 2D for presentation purposes.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00

    Open to sophomores and above.

    Open to non-majors by permission of Instructor.

  18. Wood II

    This course will deal with advanced woodworking processes, including milling and machinery use, laminate and steam bending, plywood and veneer. Techniques in using natural and synthetic materials connected with furniture will be covered.

    Major elective; ID majors only