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Fall 2020

  1. Collaborative Study

    A Collaborative Study Project (CSP) allows two students to work collaboratively to complete a faculty supervised project of independent study.

    Usually, a CSP is supervised by two faculty members, but with approval it may be supervised by one faculty member. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses, though it is not a substitute for a course if that course is regularly offered.

  2. Crisis Studio / Studio Crisis

    This fully-remote 6-credit critique-based studio will help students deepen and expand on the interests already present in their practices despite / in response to / through the lens of the present confluence of crises. All artists concerned with the ability of their work to respond meaningfully to continual upheaval will find support for their efforts here (sometimes in the form of difficult questions). Traditional approaches to artmaking will coexist alongside topical, collective, and activist strategies. Individual and group critiques, seminar components, and guided independent work time will highlight the potential for intimacy, productive vulnerability, and community responsibility to be found in online formats. The content of all work made for the class will be addressed directly, and the values and wellbeing of each artist - as a whole person - will be emphasized in considering the development of practices sustainable in the long term. Flexible synchronous and asynchronous content will aim to meet the needs of all students. The course will be taught by faculty with extensive experience of (and healthy skepticism about) online studio education, and is open to students at all levels. Substitution for major credit in Painting I, III, or Workshop will be accepted.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00

    Elective; open to seniors and above.

    Permission of department required; course not available via web registration.

    Open to non-majors pending seat availability and department permission.

  3. Digital Tools For Artists

    This is a hands-on, project-based introduction to computers and digital multimedia for artists. The course is designed to be an ongoing discussion on art, design and personal work informed by digital images, sound, video, animation, interactive multimedia, and the Internet.

    Major elective; Painting majors only.

  4. Drawing I

    An introductory level course for Painting majors. Students will develop drawing skills and insights and consider basic visual language issues. Syllabus is coordinated with Painting I.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  5. Drawing II

    A continued examination and development of drawing skills. This course is coordinated with Painting II.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  6. Experiments In Drawing

    This course examines the definition of drawing in the twentieth century. The student, while working from the basis of their own thematic and formal agenda, is directed to explore contemporary approaches to drawing. Through assignments and weekly group critiques, they will seek to broaden the conceptual basis for their work.

    Major elective; Painting majors only.

    Majors take this class or PAINT-4521 or PAINT-4597.

  7. Fundamentals: Painting Methods and Materials

    This course will provide the foundation for the creation of an archival painting practice for both traditional and contemporary painting methods. Topics covered will include tools, preparation process for both canvas and wood panels, sizes and grounds, drying oils, varnishes and resins, pigments, solvents, painting procedures, and the care of finished paintings. A historical overview of traditional methods and materials including egg tempra and oil paint will be covered, in addition to modern alkyd resins and acrylics. RISD's Environmental Health & Safety practices that pertain to painting practice and painting studio safety will be an integral part of this course. A short research paper is required to supplement studio work.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  8. Graduate Drawing

    This course presents the graduate student with a series of problems intended to develop drawing as a tool for inquiry into a terrain outside the well-known beaten paths of his/her past studio practice. Expanding the role for drawing in studio experimentation is a goal. Work will be done outside class. There are critiques each week.

    Graduate major requirement

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  9. Graduate Paint Studio Critique I

    This period is designed for the students to evaluate and analyze the directions he/she established as an undergraduate. Criticisms of the student's work will be aimed at identifying strengths and weaknesses and help the students clarify fundamental objectives. Group and individual critiques will occur by resident faculty and visiting artists and critics during the semester. Successful completion of this course is a prerequisite for continuance in the program.

    Graduate major requirement

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  10. Graduate Paint Studio Critique III

    This period is designed as an advanced critique course which involves visits by resident faculty, visiting artists and critics, with special reference to current issues and concerns in contemporary art.

    Graduate major requirement

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  11. ISP Major

    The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses.

    Permission of Instructor and GPA of 3.0 or higher is required.

    Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; the course is not available via web registration.

  12. ISP Non-major Elective

    The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses.

    Permission of Instructor and GPA of 3.0 or higher is required.

    Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; the course is not available via web registration.

  13. Painterly Prints

    This course offers a more painterly approach to the intaglio process. The students will produce applications of intaglio, such as collographs, large color monotypes and collage. Growth of imagery and technique will be encouraged through medium. A portfolio of prints will be produced.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Permission of Instructor required.

  14. Painting I

    An introduction to the basic language of the painting discipline. Emphasis on the plastic and formal considerations necessary for work that willbecome an increasingly personal statement.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  15. Painting II

    The purpose of this course is to continue development based on Painting I. Individual expression will be encouraged through a series of larger works which require greater time and organizational skill. Experimentation in different painting media, including oil, acrylic, watercolor and mixed media will be encouraged. Group and individual critiques are required. Outside work will be assigned.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  16. Painting III

    The primary goal of this course will be to shift the responsibility of direction, problem-solving and problem- development from the Faculty Instructor to the student. But this will be accomplished with a great deal of faculty involvement and support. The class will begin with group assignments which will become increasingly independent. Group and individual critiques will continue as an integral part of the curriculum, with an emphasis on contemporary art and criticism.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  17. Painting IV

    This will be a continuation of directions established in Painting III. Student work will be evaluated through group and individual critiques. Visiting Artist lectures will be important to the issues of contemporary art emphasized at this level. The department will schedule an individual review with a Faculty Committee for each student during this course.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  18. Painting Workshop

    This is an intensive program designed to test the student's ability to design, organize, and complete a project of his or her choosing.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  19. Professional Internship

    The professional Internship provides valuable exposure to a professional setting, enabling students to better establish a career path and define practical aspirations. Internship proposals are carefully vetted to determine legitimacy and must meet the contact hour requirements listed in the RISD Course Announcement.

  20. Professional Practices In Painting

    This course would address many practical issues to do with becoming a professional artist after graduation. Some of these issues are: the commercial gallery, the not-for-profit gallery, museums, graduate programs, auction houses, grants, documentation of work, archival storage of work and restoration of artwork. Professionals from the gallery, museum and other fields will be invited to the class to share their expertise with the student. Artists will be invited to talk about their professional experiences. It is a seminar class addressed particularly to the senior painting student.

    Major elective; Painting majors only

    Non-majors by permission of instructor

  21. Senior Honors Interdisciplinary Critique

    This is a course in which first-semester seniors who have already demonstrated unusual commitment, ambition and initiative within their majors will pursue and discuss independent work in a setting that reflects, as closely as possible, the interdisciplinary conversation that actually takes place around advanced art practice today. The course is intended to allow those working within medium-specific vocabularies to test how their work will make meaning in an art world in which a variety of disciplinary histories and conventions coexist, clash, and inform one another, as well as to provide an opportunity for students whose work bridges two or more disciplines (or involves performance/new genres/post-studio approaches) to learn from one another and from faculty capable of addressing all of these sorts of practices. This is a demanding critique course with additional seminar components (readings, screenings, discussions, slide presentations, etc.), and as such students can expect a workload equivalent to a core studio requirement within their major.

    Acceptance into the course will be based on a GPA of 3.25 or greater as well as the recommendation of faculty and department heads from the student's major and on review of previous work. Candidates will be identified in discussions between the instructor and department heads during the preceding spring semester. Successful completion of THAD-H490/PAINT-4507 (Contemporary Art & its Discourses) or equivalent coursework is a prerequisite, ensuring students have a shared understanding of the art historical context for interdisciplinary. The maximum enrollment is limited to seminar-size (c. 15 students) in order to provide sufficient attention to each student's work in group and individual critiques while still allowing for seminar-style discussions

    Permission of Instructor required.

  22. Three Critics

    "Three Critics" will offer graduate students the opportunity to get inside the art critic's head and learn how writers think about the visual. Students will be exposed to a wide range of viewpoints and discourse on contemporary art issues as defined by the interests of three different, practicing critics. Each critic will become part of the RISD community for approximately one month, conducting 3 sessions on campus and one in New York or Boston. On-campus meetings will consist of lectures, reading and writing assignments, group critiques and one-on-one studio visits. Off-campus trips will include visits to museums, galleries and artist studios. Small groups of students will be expected to lead several classes. Outside coursework and full participation in class discussion required for successful completion.

    Graduate major requirement; second-year graduate Painting students.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

    Five additional seats available for Fine Arts graduate students. For admission, students submit a one-page writing sample to the Painting Graduate Program Director.

Wintersession 2021

  1. Acrylics Ablaze!

    Ablaze (/?'blaz/) defined as - very brightly colored or lighted. Also interpreted as burning fiercely. In the late 1940s the creation and production of acrylic paint set the modern art world ablaze. First manufactured for industrial use, the production of polymer-based paint revolutionized the mechanics of painting forever by making its debut during the height of Geometric Abstraction, Minimalism, Abstract Expressionism, and the Color Field Movement. This studio course is designed to explore the relatively new material of acrylic paint in order to investigate contemporary ideas of color, drawing, and painting. The students will examine the various ways in which drawing with color functions as a tool for research in conjunction with the student's individual studio practice. This class will comprise assignments that encourage the students to explore ways of using acrylic paint; not only as a generative drawing material but as a way to think and to see with color. A broad application of color theory will be paired with in-class assignments that encourage the development of a unique systematic painterly vocabulary. Students will be encouraged to experiment, take chances, and collaborate while using their everyday surroundings from observation. The observational assignments will be used as a starting point for inventing with acrylic and analyzing its cultural impact on color. Observational drawing assignments will be used as a method to investigate how the seeing of color can influence such things as the speed of mark making, a sensory relationship of the eye to the hand, and elevating a sketch to the level of a finished painting. The work of such artists as Faith Ringgold, Trenton Doyle Hancock, Jessica Stockholder, David Hammons, Alfredo Zalce, Pedro Friedeberg, Suzanne Jackson and Peter Saul will be used as historical precedents for understanding different modes of thinking about drawing, color, space, and installation.

    This course will be offered as an online course only. Every class will begin as a group via Zoom for a brief introduction to the day, and then students will break off into groups/individual meetings to function as check-ins and studio visits. Students will keep common google drive folders to emulate a shared "studio wall" that all can view at any time. Each student will be required to keep an experimental sketchbook. This will be used as a source for discussions about the tenacity of acrylic paint, the development of observational drawing, and personal mark making systems. The experimental in-class assignments will be supplemented with slide presentations, group critiques, selected readings, and homework. Students may be called upon to supply their own research and subject matter(content), and to bring their own interests together with the information being explored. The class will culminate with a self-developed final project. Students of all skill levels are encouraged to take this course in order to develop their experiments of color and drawing into a thriving personal studio practice.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00

  2. Alter Ego: Theater Of The Self

    In this course, students will construct alter egos and create artwork through the lenses of their unique characters. Throughout both Art History and contemporary pop culture, artists have harnessed the alter ego as a tool to embody personas, archetypes, and subconscious dreams or idealizations. Originally coined in 1st century Rome, Cicero described the alter ego as "a second self, a trusted friend". The trope of the alter ego opens a pathway to explore identity through topics such as gender, sexuality, social constructs, cultural identity, physical appearance, and psychological inner life. Throughout this course, students will investigate how the creation of an alter ego can transform their creative practices and pave the way for otherwise hidden aspects of their artistic identity to emerge.

    The class will function as a laboratory for multidisciplinary thinking and invention with an emphasis on independent projects. Students will create an ambitious alter ego project in a medium of their choosing. Additionally, in-class drawing and writing exercises will teach tools in the exploration of theatricality in studio practice. Research projects, student performances, screenings, slideshows, and group discussions will be explored. Online tools such as Instagram live performances, a digital archive for class projects, and various methods of virtual communication will be utilized. Viewing and reading materials from artists across a broad range of disciplines--Adrian Piper, Dynasty Handbag, Vaginal Davis, Frida Kahlo, Bunny Michael, Trenton Doyle Hancock--will provide further discussion. Students will explore questions such as: How does the concept of the alter ego challenge authenticity? How do heteronormative structures and hegemonic ethnic and gender regimes play into our ideas of neutrality? How does identity performance (ie: movement, gender/cultural performance, character narrative) factor into your creative practice? Various texts in the fields of Queer Theory and Psychology will be explored. Conversation across media will be supported. By the end of the course, students will have a developed alter ego that they can utilize and expand upon as a vessel for experimentation and risk-taking in their creative practices.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00

  3. Experimental Painting Intensive

    Experimental Painting Intensive In this introduction to painting and expanded uses of paint, projects will focus both on direct observation of models and their translation into painting, as well as expanding traditional uses of paint into various mediums through experimentation. During the first part of this intensive painting course, students will develop color equivalents for observed relationships by translating their experiences into color choices of value, intensity, hue and temperature (using charcoal, acrylic paint and oil paint (oil paint is optional) ). The second part of the course will be dedicated to expanding students' painting practices into experimental works created through assignments that will encourage explorations in digital painting, homemade animations, the miniature, and site-specific and trompe l'oeil painting installations. The class will take place in a dynamic Zoom Classroom in which all students will 1-work simultaneously in their own work spaces, 2- will be provided slide presentations and demos by the professor, 3- Will hold group discussions for critiques for each assignment. Group activities and readings will also form part of the course.

  4. ISP Major

    The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses.

    Permission of Instructor and GPA of 3.0 or higher is required.

    Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; the course is not available via web registration.

  5. Painting Without Paint

    In this online course, the student will explore ways of making works through the lens of the aesthetics of painting by investigating how color functions outside the realm of conventional painting practices. We will look at how painting intersects with other media and make projects exploring what "painterly" work looks like across disciplines. The student will work in media outside of traditional painting, with a strong focus on installation and video. As this is an interdisciplinary course, the instructor will also relate sculpture, performance, textiles, and other practices to the class, specifically looking at artists and practices historically excluded from the Western (white male) canon. The course will not emphasize mastering any one skill or medium; the student will focus more on learning how to explore new media and tailor them to their own creative practice. No prior experience with painting or other media is required, although the student is encouraged to bring in their prior experiences and combine them with new techniques learned in class. The instructor will demonstrate basic techniques in many media, to be used as starting points for exploration and disruption. Class participation is essential to the course. A key component to the class will be alternative and exploratory critique formats; the instructor will lead critiques tailored for each assignment to prompt the student to reflect on their work in new ways.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00

  6. Primary Sources Illuminating The Ocean Deep At The New Bedford Whaling Museum

    Museums are institutions that carry the legacy and history of human endeavors. The present moment is radically testing the role of museums as storytellers while also challenging how and for whom our stories are told. The colonial history of this geographic region was profoundly shaped by an industry built on the systematic hunting and harvesting of whale bodies, driving entire species to the brink of extinction. Located just 35 miles east of Providence, the New Bedford Whaling Museum tells this story and offers a challenging look into the great sacrifices made in order for American industry and culture to thrive. This year we are offering multiple fully remote virtual tours with senior curatorial staff along with additional authors and academics, enabling in-depth conversation and opportunities for connection with experts in the museum's collection. Through these tours this course asks students to reflect upon and interpret a wide range of interrelated subjects, objects, and their shared histories and relationships to both humans and whales. From folk art to nautical culture, from colonial economies to subsistence hunting, and from natural history to curatorial practice, through research, students illuminate the stories the ocean has to tell us about ourselves so that our recognition of the past may help guide us towards a more sustainable future. With enhanced access to museum archives students address these topics through research-based projects employing a range of fine art media with specific attention to contextualizing within different modes of museum display. The New Bedford Whaling museum boasts a rich collection of unique and unusual artifacts that together issue a cautionary tale, asking visitors to contemplate the tenuous line between the pursuit of profit and the destruction of that which we hold most sacred.

  7. The Generative Power Of Systematic Drawing

    "It's of no interest if control is the only thing. I believe blindly that if you arrange a sluice or frame - something will happen that you can't control. I love it when things get out of control," says Jorgen Leth to Lars Von Trier in Von Trier's documentary, Five Obstructions. In the spirit of Von Trier and Leth, and a lineage of other artists who've worked within creative boundaries, this course will use drawing to explore how altering artistic limits and freedoms can take one to unforeseen places in their work. The student will investigate the generative power of systematic drawing practices. They will investigate ways in which experimental rules and art-making games can inform the content of a work. The student will test how such things as parameters, self-enforced guidelines, and chance can enhance creativity and develop new visual ideas. ? ?The structure of the course will be composed of weekly drawing assignments, film viewings, and short writing assignments. Regular discussions will take place on zoom and asynchronously via Canvas. ? ?The student will be expected to participate in class discussions and online written feedback on peer work. Students will engage in creative games such as creating within a finite amount of time, using limited color palettes, utilizing found materials, and altering the physical abilities one has at their disposal. These exercises will aid the student in their investigation of how to create content and meaning in their work.? ?The class will include both traditional drawing techniques and use of mixed media. Interdisciplinary approaches to assignments are welcome. We understand that everyone's working space will be different, therefore the class' focus will be on finding creative solutions to prompts. For the final project, the student will set their own specific drawing guidelines based on their personal interests.?

    Estimated Materials Cost: $75.00

Spring 2021

  1. Bodies, Spaces and Power During Covid Isolation

    This course provides a space for the creation of autonomous projects and offers supplemental guidance to major studio work exploring on-line media as creative workspace. Through a cycle of project based prompts we will explore and interrogate networked mediated spaces (Zoom , IG, Vimeo, etc) that produce and distribute power, intimacies, and all the ambiguities and problematics in between. We will foster analysis and responses to current political and health crises through the production of DIY videos and mediated and/or site-specific embodied performances(and the resulting digital documentation). Students will be asked to reflect on how isolation alongside political ferment impacts daily life and their artistic practice. Deploying strategies of theatrical design, movement based performance, filmic choreography we will bolster video productions and related object making to explore the politics of these objects, their tethered nature to bodies, and power structures and the impact on the fluidity of self. We will examine how DIY production has influenced and countered conventional theatrical and cinematic productions, and we will seek to design and implement scenarios and spaces contemporaneous to the Covid crisis' necessarily imposed isolation. We will thoroughly examine concepts, design and implementation of performative spaces that grasp yet challenge familiar theatrical constructs culminating in an outward facing multi-tiered Vimeo platform. Final projects will be broadcast on Vimeo as a permanent, mutable on-line exhibition. These will be presented collaboratively and open to all publics.

    Open to juniors and above.

    Permission of Instructor required.

  2. Color Studio

    This studio-based course will provide the foundation necessary to understand basic color theory and practice in painting, art, and design. An historical and cultural perspective will be introduced to inform ongoing color studies executed in the studio. Students will acquire the vocabulary to articulate color phenomena and the means to exploit the expressive potential of color in their work. Color studies will be principally created with gouache, and a variety of other materials and means will also be explored. Lectures, demonstrations, and museum visits will supplement studio work. A short research paper is required.

    Elective; open to all majors.

  3. Contemporary Art and Criticism

    This is the second part of a two-class sequence, with Introductory Prehistory of Contemporary Art as a prerequisite.

    This class, required for painting majors in spring semester of their junior year, is devoted to the development of postmodern and contemporary art and culture from roughly 1989 to the present, introducing, contextualizing, and assessing how artists have addressed the discourses around medium, technology, globalization, colonialism, social justice, the environment in that time, how their work has been shaped by other spheres of cultural production, and how critics have responded to and theorized the art of the recent past and the present day.

    There will be a field-trip to Dia Beacon during the semester.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  4. Critical Curating

    The history of painting and the trajectory of radical exhibition models in the post-war period have always seemed divergent, even antithetical: the former pursued autonomy, then, more recently, returned to narrative and figuration, while the latter took cue, both morphologically and discursively, from installation, sited, and conceptual art. This course counters such assumptions by examining post-war painting in tandem with key moments in curating (eg. Alanna Heiss' PS1; Okwui Enwezor's Documenta XI; Jerome Sans and Nicolas Bourriaud's Palais de Tokyo; and Dan Cameron's Prospect 1). The course's second half, at once more speculative and hands on, uses the Painting Gallery as a test site for mounting an exhibition or exhibitions, with emphasis on the peculiarities that painting - bounded, rectilinear, and flat - presents. Readings to include Bruce Altschuler, Julie Ault, Thomas Crow, Thierry de Duve, Hal Foster, Brian O'Doherty and others.

    The course has a fee for two field trips to New York.

    Elective; open to senior and above.

    Permission of Instructor required.

  5. Drawing I

    An introductory level course for Painting majors. Students will develop drawing skills and insights and consider basic visual language issues. Syllabus is coordinated with Painting I.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  6. Drawing II

    A continued examination and development of drawing skills. This course is coordinated with Painting II.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  7. Experiments In Materials and Techniques Workshop

    This is a hands-on course, designed for advanced painting students who are fascinated by color, surface, transformation and alchemy, DIY processes, craftmanship, invention, and the stuff of paint. It is for those who are eager to dive deep into all sorts of materials, methods and techniques.

    The objective of the class is to arm students with the tools and resources to figure out how to make what they imagine and to expand their practice through material exploration and information sharing. With an emphasis on experimentation, play, research and development; advanced students explore, problem solve and implement specific grounds, paints, supports, mediums and tools into their own practices.

    The level of specialization and expertise students may eventually desire for their work could require seeking the advice of paint manufacturers, conservators, fabricators, other artists or even experts in other fields. How to identify and acquire knowledge outside of one's comfort zone, approaching and finding a common terminology with peers and specialists is also a part of this course. Relevant art historical and contemporary methodologies, techniques and materials will be presented. Environmental Health and Safety guidelines that apply to painting practice and painting studio safety will be an integral part of this course.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $150.00

    Major elective; Painting majors only.

    Open to juniors and above.

  8. From Painting To Cinema and Back Again

    The work intensive studio course will involved students in an intense visual, aesthetic and theoretical discussion around the historical relationship of Cinema to Painting and Arts Culture in general and move on to the analyze the current embodiment of Cinema's more conflated and confounded, co-dependant relationship to the Art's of today, tapping into the cross-pollination resulting of imagery, politics and theory's as they apply. Each class meeting will involve studio work and discussion and culminate with a film screening. The film screenings will move forward from Cinema's very beginnings to a few of today's best Indie films. The concentration of the course will be assigned painting projects that will be direct responses to the films being screened and related critiques of these projects as they pertain to the films and the applicable supplemental literature, allowing the discussion around Cinema, cinematic and art critical theory and the Art culture to be transferred to the students individual works thus allowing for the work to be seen in a larger context.

  9. Graduate Paint Studio Critique II

    This period is designed for the student to evaluate and analyze and pursue the directions he/she established in Grad Paint Studio Critique I. Group and individual critiques will occur by resident faculty and visiting artists and critics during the semester.

    Graduate major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  10. Graduate Painting Studio Thesis

    This period is designed for development and presentation of a body of work supported by a written thesis in consultation with resident faculty, visiting artists and critics during the semester. A final exhibition of work will be evaluated by a jury of Painting Faculty Members.

    Graduate major requirement

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  11. ISP Major

    The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses.

    Permission of Instructor and GPA of 3.0 or higher is required.

    Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; the course is not available via web registration.

  12. Integrations Of 3-D Modeling In Drawing and Painting

    This is an interdisciplinary course that explores drawing paralleled in digital and physical processes. At a time when digital, three-dimensional space has entered our visual vocabulary in everything from commercial and social interfacing, game design, and entertainment, now more than ever is it important to understand, build, and explore its potential. Students will be introduced to 3D modeling in both geometric and organic forms, as well as pursue physical drawing and painting methods conducive for digital integration. We will explore how physical drawings may be imported into the digital world as aids for 3D creation, as well as how 3D digital models may be exported into the physical world for 2D drawing and painting. Great emphasis will be placed on experimentation in navigating between the digital and physical processes. Exercises and assignments will be contextualized with lectures, readings and critiques. Basic drawing skills and general knowledge of Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator helpful, though not required.

    Major elective; Painting majors only.

    Open to sophomores and above.

  13. Introductory Prehistory Of Contemporary Art

    This class, required for painting majors in spring semester of sophomore year, describes five defining features of modernity, providing the broad historical backdrop for their "invention": the individual, globalization, nature, industrialization, and abstraction. The first half of the class will be devoted to the visual art of varied geographic and cultural settings prior to and during the rise of these paradigms. The second half of the class slows to focus in greater detail on the high modernist manifestations of each of those themes (interiority, capital, environment, technology, and narrative), and uses them to contextualize the art and culture of the 20th century. Periods, places, and subjects will be introduced through secondary sources, providing a critical lens through which to connect the material to present day art, culture, politics, and experience (for instance, the rise of global trade will be seen through the lens of postcolonial theory). The material for the course ends at approximately 1989, setting the stage for a more in-depth look at contemporary art, culture, and criticism in their junior year course.

    Sophomore major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Permission of Instructor required.

  14. Meaning In The Medium Of Painting

    This first-year graduate seminar approaches painting as a technical skill, a historical practice and an intellectual project. Weekly sessions begin with group discussions of key readings about recent painting. Readings are organized in three sections. The first looks backward, to the problem of medium that preoccupied modernist painting and, residually, contemporary practices until the 1980s. The second section looks at the academy, the institution and the art market, and their effect on how painting is produced, disseminated, discussed and received. The third, the most speculative, looks laterally at a range of contemporary practices and their cultural frameworks from the 1990s to the present. Frequent studio visits will occur and drive some of the reading and discussion.

    Graduate elective

    Permission of Instructor required.

  15. Painterly Prints

    This course offers a more painterly approach to the intaglio process. The students will produce applications of intaglio, such as collographs, large color monotypes and collage. Growth of imagery and technique will be encouraged through medium. A portfolio of prints will be produced.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Permission of Instructor required.

  16. Painting Degree Project

    This is a comprehensive course designed to test the student's ability to create, complete, and document a Degree Project of his or her choosing. The Degree Project should be a distinct, carefully conceived, exhibition-ready body of work which reflects the issues and objectives of your art. The Senior Degree Project is distinct from your Woods-Gerry Gallery exhibition, although its work can overlap with that exhibition.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  17. Painting II

    The purpose of this course is to continue development based on Painting I. Individual expression will be encouraged through a series of larger works which require greater time and organizational skill. Experimentation in different painting media, including oil, acrylic, watercolor and mixed media will be encouraged. Group and individual critiques are required. Outside work will be assigned.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  18. Painting III

    The primary goal of this course will be to shift the responsibility of direction, problem-solving and problem- development from the Faculty Instructor to the student. But this will be accomplished with a great deal of faculty involvement and support. The class will begin with group assignments which will become increasingly independent. Group and individual critiques will continue as an integral part of the curriculum, with an emphasis on contemporary art and criticism.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

  19. Painting IV

    This will be a continuation of directions established in Painting III. Student work will be evaluated through group and individual critiques. Visiting Artist lectures will be important to the issues of contemporary art emphasized at this level. The department will schedule an individual review with a Faculty Committee for each student during this course.

    Major requirement; Painting majors only.

    Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.