Fall 2022

  1. A Collaborative Study Project (CSP) allows two students to work collaboratively to complete a faculty supervised project of independent study. Usually, a CSP is supervised by two faculty members, but with approval it may be supervised by one faculty member. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses, though it is not a substitute for a course if that course is regularly offered.
  2. This studio-based course will provide the foundation necessary to understand basic color theory and practice in painting, art and design. A historical and cultural perspective will be introduced to inform ongoing color studies executed in the studio. Students will acquire the vocabulary to articulate color phenomena and the means to exploit teh expressive potential of color in their work. Color studies will be principally created with gouache, and a variety of other materials and means will also be explored. lectures, demonstrations, and museum visits will supllement studio work. (An in class presentation is required). Elective; open to all majors.
  3. This is a hands-on, project-based introduction to computers and digital multimedia for artists. The course is designed to be an ongoing discussion on art, design and personal work informed by digital images, sound, video, animation, interactive multimedia, and the Internet. Major elective; Painting majors only.
  4. An introductory level course for Painting majors. Students will develop drawing skills and insights and consider basic visual language issues. Syllabus is coordinated with Painting I. Major requirement; Painting majors only. Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.
  5. This course examines the definition of drawing in the twentieth century. The student, while working from the basis of their own thematic and formal agenda, is directed to explore contemporary approaches to drawing. Through assignments and weekly group critiques, they will seek to broaden the conceptual basis for their work. Major elective; Painting majors only. Majors take this class or PAINT-4521 or PAINT-4597.
  6. This course will provide the foundation for the creation of an archival painting practice for both traditional and contemporary painting methods. Topics covered will include tools, preparation process for both canvas and wood panels, sizes and grounds, drying oils, varnishes and resins, pigments, solvents, painting procedures, and the care of finished paintings. A historical overview of traditional methods and materials including egg tempra and oil paint will be covered, in addition to modern alkyd resins and acrylics. RISD's Environmental Health & Safety practices that pertain to painting practice and painting studio safety will be an integral part of this course. A short research paper is required to supplement studio work. Major requirement; Painting majors only. Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.
  7. This course presents the graduate student with a series of problems intended to develop drawing as a tool for inquiry into a terrain outside the well-known beaten paths of his/her past studio practice. Expanding the role for drawing in studio experimentation is a goal. Work will be done outside class. There are critiques each week. Graduate major requirement Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.
  8. This period is designed for the students to evaluate and analyze the directions he/she established as an undergraduate. Criticisms of the student's work will be aimed at identifying strengths and weaknesses and help the students clarify fundamental objectives. Group and individual critiques will occur by resident faculty and visiting artists and critics during the semester. Successful completion of this course is a prerequisite for continuance in the program. Graduate major requirement Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.
  9. This period is designed as an advanced critique course which involves visits by resident faculty, visiting artists and critics, with special reference to current issues and concerns in contemporary art. Graduate major requirement Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.
  10. The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses. Permission of Instructor and GPA of 3.0 or higher is required. Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; the course is not available via web registration.
  11. This course offers a more painterly approach to the intaglio process. The students will produce applications of intaglio, such as collographs, large color monotypes and collage. Growth of imagery and technique will be encouraged through medium. A portfolio of prints will be produced. Major requirement; Painting majors only. Permission of Instructor required.
  12. An introduction to the basic language of the painting discipline. Emphasis on the plastic and formal considerations necessary for work that willbecome an increasingly personal statement. Major requirement; Painting majors only. Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.
  13. The primary goal of this course will be to shift the responsibility of direction, problem-solving and problem- development from the Faculty Instructor to the student. But this will be accomplished with a great deal of faculty involvement and support. The class will begin with group assignments which will become increasingly independent. Group and individual critiques will continue as an integral part of the curriculum, with an emphasis on contemporary art and criticism. Major requirement; Painting majors only. Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.
  14. This is an intensive program designed to test the student's ability to design, organize, and complete a project of his or her choosing. Major requirement; Painting majors only. Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.
  15. The professional Internship provides valuable exposure to a professional setting, enabling students to better establish a career path and define practical aspirations. Internship proposals are carefully vetted to determine legitimacy and must meet the contact hour requirements listed in the RISD Course Announcement.
  16. This course would address many practical issues to do with becoming a professional artist after graduation. Some of these issues are: the commercial gallery, the not-for-profit gallery, museums, graduate programs, auction houses, grants, documentation of work, archival storage of work and restoration of artwork. Professionals from the gallery, museum and other fields will be invited to the class to share their expertise with the student. Artists will be invited to talk about their professional experiences. It is a seminar class addressed particularly to the senior painting student. Major elective; Painting majors only Non-majors by permission of instructor
  17. "Three Critics" will offer graduate students the opportunity to get inside the art critic's head and learn how writers think about the visual. Students will be exposed to a wide range of viewpoints and discourse on contemporary art issues as defined by the interests of three different, practicing critics. Each critic will become part of the RISD community for approximately one month, conducting 3 sessions on campus and one in New York or Boston. On-campus meetings will consist of lectures, reading and writing assignments, group critiques and one-on-one studio visits. Off-campus trips will include visits to museums, galleries and artist studios. Small groups of students will be expected to lead several classes. Outside coursework and full participation in class discussion required for successful completion. Graduate major requirement; second-year graduate Painting students. Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration. Five additional seats available for Fine Arts graduate students. For admission, students submit a one-page writing sample to the Painting Graduate Program Director.

Wintersession 2023

  1. This studio-based course will provide the foundation necessary to understand basic color theory and practice in painting, art and design. A historical and cultural perspective will be introduced to inform ongoing color studies executed in the studio. Students will acquire the vocabulary to articulate color phenomena and the means to exploit teh expressive potential of color in their work. Color studies will be principally created with gouache, and a variety of other materials and means will also be explored. lectures, demonstrations, and museum visits will supllement studio work. (An in class presentation is required). Elective; open to all majors.
  2. Walking is a way in which we ground ourselves. Our bodies are both a tool for making and the source from which meaning arises. Students will be encouraged to carefully articulate their relationships to the world, giving rise to the emotional states that are felt as they engage with the architectural gridding of walk in the city. Exploration of memory will be explored by reading Erling Kagge's Walking: One Step at a Time and Freud's Mystic Writing Pad. The physical concept of a walk will be translated into a metaphor of the grid and its ability to act as a passageway into metaphorical and phenomenological mapping. By reading excerpts of Mike Kelly's psychogeography essays and Gaston Bachelard's The Poetics of Space, students will evaluate the feelings and levels of remembrance that spaces elicit. They will build their own spaces through digital rendering, drawing and sculptural practices that will then be used as live models for painting in a way that lends itself best to their personal practices. Students will move through metaphorical spaces towards a more realized exploration of spatial duration, with a focus on the architectonics of time. Here, they will delve deeper into motion through the prolonged observation of surroundings, film and performance art that elicits the human body's movement through space-farmed architecture. Screenings of Inception, Janine Antoni's Rope Dance, Hito Steyrel's Power Walks, and presentations highlighting Mike Kelly's Educational Complex, Agnes Martin's Wood 1, and Jacob Satterwhite's A Room for Living will be used to inform the painter's process of spatial construction within their own work. The course acts as a fusion of contemporary and classical theoretical concepts, in addition to an emphasis on open studio time. Students will create two original, self-directed projects dealing with the spaces that surround us, the politics of the city streets, the psychological biases of architecture, methods of recollection, the architectonics of time, phenomenology, and grid systems.
  3. What does it mean to represent the landscape in an age of ecological collapse? What is the difference between a landscape painted en plein air, and one constructed in the studio? How might a walk in the woods constitute an aesthetic experience? What are the relationships between land, history, and time? Following the art historian W. J. T. Mitchell, we will endeavor to think of the "landscape" not as a passive object - a backdrop against which human actions take place; a site of physical, visual, or intellectual conquest - but rather as an entity that exerts an active influence on the individual and society: a "process by which social and subjective identities are formed." This course is for all artists who wish to deepen their perceptual and theoretical relationship to natural spaces. Weekly readings will offer opportunities to reflect critically on work done in the studio and out of doors. Regular slide lectures as well as visits to the RISD Museum and Nature Lab will prompt discussions about how artists across the globe, from the contemporary period to antiquity, have communicated deeply political ideas through representations of, and engagements with, the natural world. Estimated Materials Cost: $150.00
  4. In today's social-media-fulled economy of immediacy, we are each considered supreme consumers, offering up our purchasing power and our very selves as commodity. Our generation dwells comfortably within a rapid pace of consumption. This consumption is expansive - it manifests in materials like food packaging, plastic, textiles and also in digital images, experiences, information and interactions. How this massive amount of disposable and ephemeral material can be "materialised" will be the central idea of this class and our discourse. The students will explore a variety of painting and printmaking techniques to cultivate their imaginative capacities as artists. These explorations in materiality will help them experiment with materials and bring new dynamics to their practices. Students will learn the elements and principles of design while experimenting with material surface and scale by creating work that is larger-than-life, shrunken in scale, and varying sizes in between. They will also explore a wide range of materials, - sourced and found, non-traditional art objects and combine it with the conventional mediums of painting and printmaking techniques. The developing skills in rendering with linear perspective, composition, various mark-making gestures, use of gradation shading, color blending, and layering processes. Visit to the digital printing lab and RISD Museum to inspire studio work will be part of the curriculum. This course welcomes and is designed for beginning students with little painting/print experience, as well as advance level students who want to continue developing their skills and confidence in different mediums. Estimated Materials Cost: $150.00 - $200.00
  5. Painting from Observation will be a team taught Schedule A and B marathon for 6 credits. Drawing, collage, printmaking and painting will introduce students to contemporary painting as practised by the RISD Painting Department. This course is a comprehensive introduction to painting. It is designed to develop confidence and experience with paint and painting. We will examine historical and contemporary trends and paint from life models and photo sources. Fundamental techniques for basic ground preparation, oil painting mediums and direct as well as in direct processes will be taught. Representational painting will be the primary focus but experiences in abstract painting will also be encouraged. We will learn abstract principles that organize composition, depict spatial illusion and describe form while developing a shared language for critiques. No prior painting experience is required.
  6. The word "photography" was created from the Greek roots (photós), genitive of (phos), "light" and (graphé) "representation by means of lines" or "drawing" together meaning "drawing with light". Drawing and photography are often considered to be the most direct forms of media with which to engage with the world. They share fascinating parallels: the blank sheet of paper and the photosensitive surface, graphite marks and silver emulsion, the sense of an invisible apparatus (i.e. the camera and pencil), the engagement with surface, light, negative and positive, the trace and the indexical. This course seeks to explore the multifarious ways in which photography and drawing can be combined and extended into new arenas in interdisciplinary practices. We will explore the relationships between absence/presence, nature/culture, real/representation, inside/outside, time/space, and the collapse of oppositional terms (original/reproduction) that has been identified with electronic reproduction. Through snapshots we will explore different forms of seeing and being seen. We will explore the idea of the archive and how images are crucial documentation that sustains and affirms memory. We will also be exploring the importance of representation through photography. We will discuss the relationship between photography and BIPOC communities. We will understand that more than any other image-making tool the camera has offered BIPOC communities disempowered in white culture, a way to empower themselves through representation and immediate intervention. This course will allow us to combine image making, resistance struggle, and pleasure. We will institute a collective will to participate in a non-institutionalized curatorial process. In this course students will utilize photography to create a visual language from which they will pull imagery to create a final art project. Students will create a final self-directed art project that utilizes the means and methods discussed in class. The structure of the course will be composed of weekly in and out of class "drawing" assignments, film viewings, readings, discussions, and critiques. The student will be expected to participate in class discussions and provide written and oral feedback on peer work. We will hold individual studio visits and allow students open studio time.
  7. Museums are stewards of history; the present moment is radically testing the role museums play as storytellers while also challenging how and for whom historical narratives are told. The colonial history of this region was profoundly shaped by an industry built on the systematic hunting and harvesting of whales, driving entire species to the brink of extinction. Located just 35 miles east of Providence, the New Bedford Whaling Museum tells this story and offers a challenging look into the great sacrifices made in order for American industry and culture to thrive. Through several visits to the New Bedford Whaling Museum this course asks students to reflect upon and interpret a wide range of interrelated subjects, objects, and their shared histories and relationships to both humans, whales, and the environment. From folk art to nautical culture, from colonial economies to subsistence hunting, and from natural history to curatorial practice, through research, students illuminate the stories the ocean has to tell us about ourselves so that our recognition of the past may help guide us towards a more sustainable future. With enhanced access to museum archives students address these topics with research-based projects employing a range of fine art media with specific attention to contextualizing within different modes of museum display. The New Bedford Whaling museum boasts a rich collection of unique and unusual artifacts, issuing a cautionary tale, and asking visitors to contemplate the tenuous line between the pursuit of profit and the destruction of that which is most sacred.
  8. This course will explore collage as a conceptual and epistemological method which can be productively and poetically applied to a diverse range of media, material, and subject matter. We will approach collage not only as a material activity or discipline, but as a way of thinking in and of itself. As a framework for working with and through material, collage is a useful tool for thinking laterally, compositionally, orbitally and rhizomatically. These are a few of the key paradigms of thought that we will delve into over the course of this class. Collage also has deep and rich political implications, which will be examined as an important thread in the course; from challenging material hierarchies to subverting hegemonic mass media narratives, remixing the lost and found images (and raw materials) of our world embodies a type of radical reorientation to the narratives, materials, and messages that we find ourselves inundated by in contemporary culture. In this course collage will be proposed as a method that is fundamentally collaborative, transgressive, and experimental. In keeping with that spirit, the structure and atmosphere of the class will strive towards openness, and community. There will be opportunities for group work, generative classroom games, and invitations for students to reflect upon and direct the trajectory of their class experience alongside more traditional modes of learning such as readings, lectures, and critiques. This course is not a project based class. While there are some required assignments with prescriptive forms, the majority of the participants' studio work will be flexibly customized to their own interests, which, ideally, will be shaped, transformed, and guided by the content we explore as a class. Estimated Materials Cost: $70.00 - $200.00

Spring 2023

  1. This studio-based course will provide the foundation necessary to understand basic color theory and practice in painting, art and design. A historical and cultural perspective will be introduced to inform ongoing color studies executed in the studio. Students will acquire the vocabulary to articulate color phenomena and the means to exploit teh expressive potential of color in their work. Color studies will be principally created with gouache, and a variety of other materials and means will also be explored. lectures, demonstrations, and museum visits will supllement studio work. (An in class presentation is required). Elective; open to all majors.
  2. This is the second part of a two-class sequence, with Introductory Prehistory of Contemporary Art as a prerequisite. This class, required for painting majors in spring semester of their junior year, is devoted to the development of postmodern and contemporary art and culture from roughly 1989 to the present, introducing, contextualizing, and assessing how artists have addressed the discourses around medium, technology, globalization, colonialism, social justice, the environment in that time, how their work has been shaped by other spheres of cultural production, and how critics have responded to and theorized the art of the recent past and the present day. There will be a field-trip to Dia Beacon during the semester. Major requirement; Painting majors only. Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.
  3. The history of painting and the trajectory of radical exhibition models in the post-war period have always seemed divergent, even antithetical: the former pursued autonomy, then, more recently, returned to narrative and figuration, while the latter took cue, both morphologically and discursively, from installation, sited, and conceptual art. This course counters such assumptions by examining post-war painting in tandem with key moments in curating (eg. Alanna Heiss' PS1; Okwui Enwezor's Documenta XI; Jerome Sans and Nicolas Bourriaud's Palais de Tokyo; and Dan Cameron's Prospect 1). The course's second half, at once more speculative and hands on, uses the Painting Gallery as a test site for mounting an exhibition or exhibitions, with emphasis on the peculiarities that painting - bounded, rectilinear, and flat - presents. Readings to include Bruce Altschuler, Julie Ault, Thomas Crow, Thierry de Duve, Hal Foster, Brian O'Doherty and others. The course has a fee for two field trips to New York. Elective; open to senior and above. Permission of Instructor required.
  4. A continued examination and development of drawing skills. This course is coordinated with Painting II. Major requirement; Painting majors only. Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.
  5. This is a hands-on course, designed for advanced painting students who are fascinated by color, surface, transformation and alchemy, DIY processes, craftmanship, invention, and the stuff of paint. It is for those who are eager to dive deep into all sorts of materials, methods and techniques. The objective of the class is to arm students with the tools and resources to figure out how to make what they imagine and to expand their practice through material exploration and information sharing. With an emphasis on experimentation, play, research and development; advanced students explore, problem solve and implement specific grounds, paints, supports, mediums and tools into their own practices. The level of specialization and expertise students may eventually desire for their work could require seeking the advice of paint manufacturers, conservators, fabricators, other artists or even experts in other fields. How to identify and acquire knowledge outside of one's comfort zone, approaching and finding a common terminology with peers and specialists is also a part of this course. Relevant art historical and contemporary methodologies, techniques and materials will be presented. Environmental Health and Safety guidelines that apply to painting practice and painting studio safety will be an integral part of this course. Estimated Materials Cost: $150.00 Major elective; Painting majors only. Open to juniors and above.
  6. The work intensive studio course will involved students in an intense visual, aesthetic and theoretical discussion around the historical relationship of Cinema to Painting and Arts Culture in general and move on to the analyze the current embodiment of Cinema's more conflated and confounded, co-dependant relationship to the Art's of today, tapping into the cross-pollination resulting of imagery, politics and theory's as they apply. Each class meeting will involve studio work and discussion and culminate with a film screening. The film screenings will move forward from Cinema's very beginnings to a few of today's best Indie films. The concentration of the course will be assigned painting projects that will be direct responses to the films being screened and related critiques of these projects as they pertain to the films and the applicable supplemental literature, allowing the discussion around Cinema, cinematic and art critical theory and the Art culture to be transferred to the students individual works thus allowing for the work to be seen in a larger context.
  7. This period is designed for the student to evaluate and analyze and pursue the directions he/she established in Grad Paint Studio Critique I. Group and individual critiques will occur by resident faculty and visiting artists and critics during the semester. Graduate major requirement; Painting majors only. Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.
  8. This period is designed for development and presentation of a body of work supported by a written thesis in consultation with resident faculty, visiting artists and critics during the semester. A final exhibition of work will be evaluated by a jury of Painting Faculty Members. Graduate major requirement Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.
  9. This class, required for painting majors in spring semester of sophomore year, describes five defining features of modernity, providing the broad historical backdrop for their "invention": the individual, globalization, nature, industrialization, and abstraction. The first half of the class will be devoted to the visual art of varied geographic and cultural settings prior to and during the rise of these paradigms. The second half of the class slows to focus in greater detail on the high modernist manifestations of each of those themes (interiority, capital, environment, technology, and narrative), and uses them to contextualize the art and culture of the 20th century. Periods, places, and subjects will be introduced through secondary sources, providing a critical lens through which to connect the material to present day art, culture, politics, and experience (for instance, the rise of global trade will be seen through the lens of postcolonial theory). The material for the course ends at approximately 1989, setting the stage for a more in-depth look at contemporary art, culture, and criticism in their junior year course. Sophomore major requirement; Painting majors only. Permission of Instructor required.
  10. This first-year graduate seminar approaches painting as a technical skill, a historical practice and an intellectual project. Weekly sessions begin with group discussions of key readings about recent painting. Readings are organized in three sections. The first looks backward, to the problem of medium that preoccupied modernist painting and, residually, contemporary practices until the 1980s. The second section looks at the academy, the institution and the art market, and their effect on how painting is produced, disseminated, discussed and received. The third, the most speculative, looks laterally at a range of contemporary practices and their cultural frameworks from the 1990s to the present. Frequent studio visits will occur and drive some of the reading and discussion. Graduate elective Permission of Instructor required.
  11. This course offers a more painterly approach to the intaglio process. The students will produce applications of intaglio, such as collographs, large color monotypes and collage. Growth of imagery and technique will be encouraged through medium. A portfolio of prints will be produced. Major requirement; Painting majors only. Permission of Instructor required.
  12. This is a comprehensive course designed to test the student's ability to create, complete, and document a Degree Project of his or her choosing. The Degree Project should be a distinct, carefully conceived, exhibition-ready body of work which reflects the issues and objectives of your art. The Senior Degree Project is distinct from your Woods-Gerry Gallery exhibition, although its work can overlap with that exhibition. Major requirement; Painting majors only. Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.
  13. The purpose of this course is to continue development based on Painting I. Individual expression will be encouraged through a series of larger works which require greater time and organizational skill. Experimentation in different painting media, including oil, acrylic, watercolor and mixed media will be encouraged. Group and individual critiques are required. Outside work will be assigned. Major requirement; Painting majors only. Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.
  14. This will be a continuation of directions established in Painting III. Student work will be evaluated through group and individual critiques. Visiting Artist lectures will be important to the issues of contemporary art emphasized at this level. The department will schedule an individual review with a Faculty Committee for each student during this course. Major requirement; Painting majors only. Registration by Painting Department, course not available via web registration.

SS 2022

  1. The professional Internship provides valuable exposure to a professional setting, enabling students to better establish a career path and define practical aspirations. Internship proposals are carefully vetted to determine legitimacy and must meet the contact hour requirements listed in the RISD Course Announcement.