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Fall 2019

  1. 3d City and Landscape

    3D visualizations of cities and landscapes capture the imagination and make abstract data tangible. They are used as backdrops in animations, to convey planning scenarios, and increasingly to spatialize different kinds of data from social and physical sciences. This course equips students with tools and skills to create city and landscape models and visualize data using them. Custom software tools will enable students to quickly realize 3D models and visualizations in Rhino and subsequently explore the ethical implications of these models using related readings and class discussions. Students will obtain and utilize geographic data, learning principles and techniques that are adaptable to multiple software platforms. Readings and discussions address the ethics of data-driven spatial visualizations. Students at all levels of coding experience will have the ability to advance their skills, and using materials provided in class will be able to create projects on their own. Rhino software and experience with the program are required. Students interested in adapting methods to other platforms will also be supported. Samples and a full syllabus can be seen at www.peterstempel.com.

    Open to junior and above.

    Also offered as IDISC-1727, INTAR-1727 and LDAR-1727; Register in the course for which credit is desired.

  2. Advanced Studio

    These studios, three of which are required for graduation, are offered by individual instructors to students who have successfully completed the core curriculum. They are assigned by lottery. Once assigned to an advanced studio, a student may not drop studio.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $50.00 - $200.00

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

    Fee: Some advanced studio sections have a fee for course supplies or field trips. The fee is announced during the registration lottery held in the department.

  3. Advanced Topics In Architectural Computation

    This 3 credit advanced seminar offers students the opportunity to focus on computational topics pertaining to architecture. Computational techniques and computational ideas are explored through making, writing, reading, and discussion. Some of the work in this course will take place in the space of the digital model, but coding, physical computation, and human computation may also enter into play. Students in this course will, under the mentorship of faculty, develop a level of expertise and knowledge that goes beyond what is usually associated with the requisite skills for contemporary architectural practice. Conversely, it is expected that computation may provoke a challenge to even the most base conceptions of design and architecture. Each iteration of this course will identify and advance a single theme, concept or problem. Some issues that may arise during this course include authorship, modeling vs simulation, computer controlled fabrication, intelligence, and creativity. Prerequisite: completion of Architectural Projection or permission of instructor with a demonstrated experience with 2-D and 3-D software.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $20.00 - $100.00

    Major elective

    For Fall and Spring Semesters:

    Restricted to Architecture majors junior and above; open to CTC Concentrators and non-majors pending seat availability and permission of Instructor.

    For Wintersession:

    Open to undergraduate and graduate students.

  4. Advanced Topics In Architectural Drawing

    This 3 credit advanced seminar offers students the opportunity to focus on drawing topics pertaining to architecture. Drawing is treated as a space for architectural research and/or as an autonomous work of architecture. The notion that drawing serves architecture merely as representation is questioned and critiqued. The theoretical and technical focus on the process of drawing will cultivate and address issues that have for hundreds of years served as the core of the architecture discipline. Simultaneously, the research may allow for the generation or assimilation of ideas, cultures and knowledge from other fields into architecture.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $20.00 - $100.00

    Major elective

    Restricted to Architecture majors junior and above; open to non-majors pending seat availability and permission of Instructor.

  5. Advanced Topics In Architectural Theory

    Theory offerings in the architecture department are deliberately consistent or complementary with our pedagogy, born and raised in an arts college. Theory based courses have a basis in empiricism, direct observation and experience of creative processes. Recognizing that discovery and invention often come between existing matrices of thought, offerings may be from disciplines other than architecture or branches of knowledge other than art and design.

    Objectives of the theory component of our curriculum are to:

    1. Expand the capacity to speculate productively.

    2. Develop the skeptic's eye and mind.

    3. Equip the ability to recognize connections that trigger discovery and invention.

    Major elective

    Restricted to Architecture majors junior and above; open to non-majors pending seat availability and permission of Instructor.

  6. Arch: Outgoing Exchange Pgm

    This course registers an outgoing exchange student into a pre-approved ARCH studio course which is taken at the exchange school. Successful completion of the course will result in a "T" grade once receipt of the official transcript from the partner school has arrived at Registrar's Office.

  7. Architectural Projection

    This course introduces the beginning student to the origins, media, geometries and role(s) of projection drawing in the design and construction process. The student will learn systems of projection drawing from direct experience, and be challenged to work both from life and to life. Subjects such as transparency, figure/ground, sciagraphy, oblique projection, surface development, volumetric intersections, spatial manipulation and analytic operations will build on the basics of orthographic and conic projection. The course involves line and tone drawing, hand drafting, computer drawing(Autocad) and computer modeling(Rhino).

    Estimated Materials Cost: $20.00 - $100.00 Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  8. Architecture Professional Internship

    ARCH-2199 is the required summer internship. It may be completed in any summer prior to entering the final year. Total hours required are 280. This internship can count for NCARB Architectural Experience Program AX-P. The internship hours for ARCH-2199 can be used towards architecture licensure through the NCARB Internship. Student's intent upon becoming registered architects in the USA after graduation should enroll in the AXP as soon as possible. AXP is the internship program required by all registration jurisdictions. The work experience accomplished during ARCH-2199, the department's minimum Internship experience (280 hours) can be recorded as acceptable experience in the AXP (3740 hours) and thus accelerate one's pace towards architectural licensure.

    Website: http://www.ncarb.org/Experience-Through-Internship s.aspx

    To register, go to www.risdcareers.com (ArtWorks)

    Course not available via web registration.

  9. Collaborative Study

    A Collaborative Study Project (CSP) allows two students to work collaboratively to complete a faculty supervised project of independent study.

    Usually, a CSP is supervised by two faculty members, but with approval it may be supervised by one faculty member. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses, though it is not a substitute for a course if that course is regularly offered.

  10. Core 1 Studio: Subjects. Tools. Process.

    This first of three core studios introduces the art of architecture as a design-based process and language, shaped by the practices, conventions, and contradictions of the discipline that have historically informed our spatial investigations.

    The agency of architecture lies in its capacity to be enactive. It is occupied, experienced and materialized; it constructs, organizes and extends relations among the many. Its forms, spatial orders, materials, and systems result from the designed consideration of physical and spatial interdependencies with the practices, habits and aspirations of its subjects. Providing a precise and delimited set of tools and armatures, this first of three core studios introduces the art of architecture as a design process and language that activates, mediates and politicizes the built environment and its subjects.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $250.00

    Graduate major requirement; M.ARCH only.

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  11. Core 3 Studio: Cities

    At a moment marked by the increasing homogenization and inaccessibility of cities, we will examine and generate urban experiments that represent radical forms of inclusion and place-making.

    If we reject the premise that contemporary cities are facilitators of extractive regimes, then we can analyze urban experiments that represent alternative forms of coexistence between humans, non-humans, and their expansive environments. This studio examines cities as negotiators between systems of inclusion and exclusion. Systems of inclusion will be sampled from multiple cities and societies, with diverse social orders and forms of place-making. This robust archive of socio- spatial concepts will be edited, combined, and tested on a specific site of contestation. We will investigate visible and invisible forms of infrastructure as opportunities to establish new platforms for cultural production; expanding contemporary sustainability discourse through the intersection of social, political, and economic asymmetries. The aim is to develop a critical framework for our ongoing construction and conception of cities.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $210.00

    Graduate major requirements; M.ARCH only.

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  12. Drawings

    This course connects the methods, traditions, and conventions of architectural drawing with contemporary technology and representational cultures.

    The language of architecture remains in flux. Drawing is the territory in which that language can be explored, provoked and harnessed. Inevitably, this inquiry involves a reflection on the human condition, the nature of creativity, and the agency of representation. This course contends with the tension between the digital and the material; the drawing and the image; the need to represent and the urge to express; the constraints of tools and the open-endedness of media; the professional obligation to communicate and the disciplinary need to operate creatively; Abstraction is the underlying theme, idea and framework by which students engage the algorithm, the model, the mark, and the pixel. Creative prompts and technical instruction develop a student's intuition, sensibility and skill with respect to digital softwares, workflows, and interdisciplinary cultures of making, publishing, and disseminating work.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $300.00

    Graduate major requirement; M.ARCH only.

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  13. EHP Fall:studio Concentration

    In this intensive independent studio students continue and complete the work began in "EHP Studio Elective", culminating in the final exhibition and review. It corresponds to the remaining four weeks of the program, after students have finished with their Art History and Italian classes.

    Note: EHP credits replace the on-campus major requirements for the term students attend. Distribution to non-major requirements occurs when major credits are not needed.

  14. EHP Studio Elective

    Independent studio is at the core of the EHP experience. Upon arrival, students are assigned studio space at the Palazzetto Cenci, home of RISD's program in Rome. With guidance from the chief critic, each student develops a personal body of work sparked by his/her interactions with places, people and circumstances in Rome and other locations that are part of the EHP tours (such as the Northern, Southern or Eastern tours, as well as other shorter trips.) The work takes as a point of departure knowledge and techniques specific to individual home departments, but allows, and even encourages, explorations beyond disciplinary boundaries, including collaborations and cross-fertilization within a group of students from different departments working together.

    Beyond consistent and thorough engagement with studio work, requirements include participation in open studios and exhibitions, presentations in reviews, and attendance to all group activities and events, such as lectures at the Cenci and other institutions. From time to time, the chief critic may issue short assignments to introduce or focus on a particular subject. As part of the studio elective, students may be encouraged to keep sketchbooks and/or diaries, participate in optional activities--such as figure drawing sessions--and search for brief internships, apprenticeships, or other forms of interactions with local artists, designers, curators and critics.

    EHP Studio Elective corresponds to the first twelve weeks of the program, while students are also taking Art History and Italian classes. This course establishes the direction for the work in the "Studio Concentration" course that follows.

    Note: EHP credits replace the on-campus major requirements for the term students attend. Distribution to non-major requirements occurs when major credits are not needed.

  15. Environmental Design I

    The study of basic concepts of Human Environmental Comforts. Inherent within 'physio-environ' considerations are principles of temperature, humidity, heat transfer, air movement, and hydrostatics. These principles will be studied in terms of their abstract physics and mathematics, through empirical benchmarking and as the basis for a design proposal that includes considerations of larger scale strategies as well as assemblies. Emphasis will be placed on the principles behind the technology, the behavioral characteristics and the qualities of the systems' operation considered in making building design decisions.

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Open to NCSS Concentrators pending seat availability and permission of Instructor.

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  16. Geodesign In Context

    Geodesign addresses complex time dependent problems such as climate adaptation by incorporating stakeholder feedback and simulations into iterative planning processes. Students in this seminar will explore both the possibilities and limitations of geodesign by participating in RISD's 2020 International Geodesign Collaboration (IGC) project focusing on coastal adaptation. IGC tests a globally comparable range of strategies in sites around the world to support the United Nations Millennium Development Goals. In class activities include design charrettes, stakeholder and expert visits, using Rhino and GIS to prepare visioning scenarios, analyzing social science survey data. Homework will consist of academic reading (+/- 10 - 15 pages/week) supported by study guides or completing concise drawing tasks on some occasions. A limited number of research assistantships will be available to support GIS work, an evaluative study, and publication of results in an academic journal (participation will be recognized with acknowledgement and exceptional contributions with co-authorship). Experience with Rhino or GIS is recommended to maximize the value of the class but not required. Students interested in developing thesis projects around coastal adaptation to sea level rise are encouraged to participate, as relevant materials and subject matter will be included.

    Open to all majors junior and above.

    Also offered as IDISC-1730, INTAR-1730, LAEL-1730 and LDAR-1730; Register in the course for which credit is desired.

  17. Graduate Theory Seminar: Making Discourse

    This is a theoretical seminar course that will be concerned with ideas and architectural knowledge that may be cultivated and tested through discourse. The course discussions will focus on an expansive role of architectural tools. While acknowledging a wealth of disciplinary conventions, histories and theories, this course recognizes that the forms of representation within the discipline of architecture have the capacity to affect the discipline of architecture and are not fixed. Students in this course will be expected to build upon their previous architectural education through a series of directed projects aimed at advancing architectural theories, ideas and methods. Some of the questions that students will be expected to address are: What are the practical, theoretical, and creative implications of a drawing that functions as architecture? How do architects change the way we make and think thanks to digital media? How do architects represent and model natural forces? How do architects express political or social agendas? What is the nature of an architectural contribution to interdisciplinary discourse? How can representation enable new kinds of artistic and research-based practices for architecture? Students will be expected to self-direct their process while framing their work intellectually in a seminar environment.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $150.00

    Graduate Major requirement; Architecture 2-year majors only

    Open to first-year M.ARCH Advanced Standing students only.

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

    Open to non-majors pending seat availability and permission of Instructor.

  18. ISP Major

    The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses.

    Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; course not available via web registration.

  19. Integrated Building Systems

    Conceived as the culmination of the technologies sequence of courses, this course allows students to choose amongst the three instructor's differing approaches to the problem of conceiving technology holistically, in relation to a set of architectural criteria. The conceptual and technical aspects of building systems are considered and emergent environmentally-conscious technologies are emphasized for research and application.

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

    Prerequisites: All required technologies courses.

  20. Modern Architecture

    The course will focus on the diverse new roles encountered by the architect in the 20th century: form maker, administrator of urban development, social theorist, cultural interpreter, ideologue. Emphasis will be placed upon the increasing interdependence of architecture and the city, and the recurrent conflicts between mind and hand, modernity and locality, expressionism and universality.

    Major requirement; Architecture majors

    Art History credit for Architecture majors

    Liberal Arts elective credit for non-majors pending seat availability.

  21. Professional Internship

    The professional Internship provides valuable exposure to a professional setting, enabling students to better establish a career path and define practical aspirations. Internship proposals are carefully vetted to determine legitimacy and must meet the contact hour requirements listed in the RISD Course Announcement.

  22. Scope Seminar

    This seminar will utilize the content, topic, and conceit of measure as a pinhole through which to see the world of Directed Design Research. Directed Design Research is an alternative to Thesis, which lays out a specific territory of inquiry and encourages students to identify the topic and scope of their work, emanating from this specific point of departure. The seminar will lay out a series of methods, techniques, and exercises related to the exploration of measure, asking each student to then define a territory of inquiry within this delimited field. The deliverables for the Scope Seminar include a thoughtfully delimited and actionable statement of the intended design research, the documentation of a minimum of three methodologies or approaches to be utilized in the design research, and a well-wrought syllabus that includes: a weekly breakdown of tasks and deliverables, relevant references and precedents properly cited, and a concise text (3 pages maximum) describing the research activities to be undertaken.

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  23. Steel Structures

    This course reviews the role of metals in architecture, focusing on the fundamentals of steel analysis and design in architecture; and examines typical framing techniques and systems. Topics include construction issues, floor framing systems, column analysis and design, steel detailing and light gauge steel framing materials and systems. In addition the course introduces students to lateral force resistance systems in steel construction and exposes them to alternatives to steel such as aluminum and fiberglass. By the end of the course, students will be aware of the role of metals in architectural design and construction; design and detail simple steel structural systems; and proportion these systems to resist the moment and shear demands determined through structural analysis.

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  24. Structural Analysis

    The basic content will be statics and strength of materials. The first portion will deal with force vectors, trusses, cross-sectional properties, and shear/moment diagrams, followed by stresses, strains, material applications and the analysis procedures necessary to compute structural behaviors. While the class format is mostly lecture, there will be ample time for discussion, in addition to group projects and field trips. This class is foundational to all future structural design classes such as Wood Structures and Steel Structures. The student will develop an intuitive understanding of structural behavior by studying various structural systems qualitatively under various loading conditions. The analysis of statically determinate trusses and frames will reinforce the intuitive understanding. Structural forces will be understood by tracing the loads (dead, live, wind, and seismic) through a building. They will be able to convert these loads into internal material stresses (axial, shear bending) for the purposes of proportioning members quantitatively. The relevant material sectional properties (such as moment of inertia and radius of gyration) will be learned through hands on bending and buckling experiments and later backed by quantitative analysis. A math test will be given prior to the first class to determine which students are required to attend a supplemental lecture class instructed by the teaching assistant. This course is a pre-requisite for Steel Structures, Wood Structures, and Concrete Structures.

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  25. The Making Of Design Principles

    This course, the first in a two semester sequence, explores design principles specific to architecture. Two interrelated aspects of design are pursued: 1) the elements of composition and their formal, spatial, and tectonic manipulation and 2) meanings conveyed by formal choices and transformations.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $50 - $200

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  26. Thesis Sem: Navigating The Creative Process

    We begin work on your Thesis Projects from the outset of the semester: navigating arbitrary beginnings; setting boundaries like nets; developing a whole language of grunts, smudges and haiku; gathering the unique and unrepeatable content, forces, and conditions of your project; hunting an emerging and fleeting idea; recognizing discoveries; projecting forward with the imagination; and distilling glyphs, diagrams and insight plans.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $50.00 - $200.00

    This course satisfies the prerequisite requirement for Thesis Project.

  27. Urban Ecologies

    The Urban Ecologies core studio introduces students to the city as a designed environment with an emphasis on sustainability, giving them the tools to work through impressions, analysis and design operations as ways to understand the relationship between naturally formed and culturally constructed landscapes and strategies for urban ecological development.". Students confront the design of housing as a way to order social relationships and shape the public realm and attack the problems of structure, construction, access and code compliance in the context of a complex large-scale architectural design.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $50.00 - $200.00

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

Wintersession 2020

  1. *Mexico: Material Propositions: Oaxaca

    Oaxaca City is situated in the mountains midway between Mexico City and the Pacific coast of Mexico. It is a World Heritage Site designated by UNESCO in recognition of its historic buildings and archaeological sites. The city's colonial history is intertwined with indigenous cultures that reside along the city edges. It is also the source of a rich contemporary art scene rooted in the current political and social climate of the area. Home to an extensive network of art centers, cultural institutions, and artisanal crafts, the place provides a rich inventory of opportunities for material observation, experimentation, and making.

    The primary focus of the studio is to weave together cultural research, material exploration, and full-scale construction to explore the resonance between traditional craft practices and contemporary techniques of design. Students will be exposed to materials based on the vernacular of the area-adobe, stone, brick, lime, bamboo, and locally made encaustic tiles-and introduced to ways in which to translate their properties into new applications and processes of assembly. The goal is to engage participants in the design of a collaborative project while understanding the culture and interests of the community it will serve. These hands-on explorations will be facilitated by community-based partners in the spirit of generating local innovation.

    The secondary component of the course will provide an opportunity for observation and visual transcription of experience through drawing and other forms of 2-D material work informed by local resources. Fieldwork will be supported by visits to cultural sites, and daily discussions will address the use of materials in design as a force to promote reimagining their applications.

    Applications open in September. Registration begins in October at a time to be announced.

    All students are required to remain in good academic standing in order to participate in the WS travel course/studio. A minimum GPA of 2.50 is required. Failure to remain in good academic standing can lead to removal from the course, either before or during the course. Also in cases where WS travel courses and studios do not reach student capacity, the course may be cancelled after the last day of Wintersession travel course registration. As such, all students are advised not to purchase flights for participation in Wintersession travel courses until the course is confirmed to run, which happens within the week after the final Wintersession travel course registration period.

    Permission of Instructor required.

    Open to sophomore and above.

    2020WS Travel Cost: $2,180.00 - airfare not included.

    ***Off-Campus Study***

  2. Arch As Micro-system

    An ecosystem is defined as "a community of interacting organisms and their environment functions as an ecological unit." So, how to design a "micro-ecosystem" as an architectural unit structurally and functionally? In this course, students will apply their research from natural materials, structures, systems, and behaviors, and then develop an integrative "micro-system." Using the RISD Nature Lab collections as primary resources, students will primarily conduct in-depth research for different types and scales of forms, from macroscopic to microscopic, from static to dynamic. While learning to use fundamental architectural analysis and design strategies, students will be expected to bring their own backgrounds into developing their "micro-system."

    To reinforce the logic of the concept, students will develop components of their "micro-system" with parametric prototyping. The Grasshopper, a plug-in from Rhinoceros, will be taught and utilized as a tool to model per-formative, tectonic, and kinetic systems. By learning to create a series of prototypes of their concepts, students will gain the opportunity to create iterations of various "micro-systems." The final project will be a synthesized design proposal with a self-determined "site" dependent on students' concepts and their architectural functions. During this course, students will produce physical and digital models, as well as architectural diagrams as a series of speculative demonstration of their research-based and performance-oriented design.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $200.00

  3. Architectonics

    An introduction to the principles of architectural design beginning with a close examination of materials, forces and the human body. The examination will progressively widen in scope to include issues of form, space, structure, program and site. This condensed architectural studio is intended for freshmen and students outside the Division of Architecture and Design.

  4. Architecture Professional Internship

    ARCH-2199 is the required summer internship. It may be completed in any summer prior to entering the final year. Total hours required are 280. This internship can count for NCARB Architectural Experience Program AX-P. The internship hours for ARCH-2199 can be used towards architecture licensure through the NCARB Internship. Student's intent upon becoming registered architects in the USA after graduation should enroll in the AXP as soon as possible. AXP is the internship program required by all registration jurisdictions. The work experience accomplished during ARCH-2199, the department's minimum Internship experience (280 hours) can be recorded as acceptable experience in the AXP (3740 hours) and thus accelerate one's pace towards architectural licensure.

    Website: http://www.ncarb.org/Experience-Through-Internship s.aspx

    To register, go to www.risdcareers.com (ArtWorks)

    Course not available via web registration.

  5. Clashing Content_nature+bim

    How do we, as architects, respond to the increasing need for sustainable and healthy design that respects the uniqueness of place? How do we find inspiration and nurture it to its final expression? Students taking this course will discover methods for integrating naturally occurring site conditions with architectural constructions in ways that do not ostracize cultural or natural contexts. They will identify and utilize existing topographical patterns and indigenous materials and building practices to develop a pavilion design for RISD Beach at Tillinghast Farm. Design iteration will incorporate McNeel Rhinoceros and Autodesk Revit to utilize the strengths of each program. Pace and repetition of exercises will deepen students' ability to analyze, process, and integrate their learning to the level of automaticity. This, in turn, will contribute to design thinking, creating, and making that is iterative, globally responsible, and culturally ethical.

    Goals/Objectives: This course will introduce a digital and empirical production process that is quick, iterative, and reflective to design a pavilion for RISD Beach at Tillinghast Farm. Cross-medium design will leverage the strengths of multiple computer programs to create an output that is not restricted, but enhanced, by these mediums. The workflow process will include observation, hand drawing, computer modeling in Rhino, proofing schematic design in Autodesk Revit, and rendering on Adobe Creative Suite. Fluency in Rhino, Revit, or Adobe is not a prerequisite but will be cultivated in this course. Production of a physical model using a 3D printer is optional. Students will have exposure to numerous methods of integrating natural and constructed systems which will impact design thinking long after this Wintersession course is completed.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $100.00

  6. Collaborative Study

    A Collaborative Study Project (CSP) allows two students to work collaboratively to complete a faculty supervised project of independent study.

    Usually, a CSP is supervised by two faculty members, but with approval it may be supervised by one faculty member. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses, though it is not a substitute for a course if that course is regularly offered.

  7. Digital Stranger: Learning To Love Lookalikes, Welcome The Imposter, and Cultivate The Uncanny

    Digital Stranger: Learning to love look alikes, welcome the impostor, and cultivate the uncanny

    The course will examine questions of authorship and representation with regards to digital fabrication in art and architecture. What is lost or gained when the digital becomes physical? Does authorship begin or end at material translation? Through a series of connected assignments, demonstrations, and tutorials, students will be introduced to a variety digital fabrication methods that will challenge traditional notions of authorship and materiality. Relying heavily on open source 3D model repositories, students will be asked to choose a digital artifact. From there, a series of material translations will transform and redefine the initial object. In doing so, students will be forced to directly confront notions of originality and authenticity. In addition to being introduced to 3D modeling, printing, and scanning techniques - students will be able to navigate the space between fabrication, and digital representation.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $150.00

  8. ISP Major

    The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses.

    Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; course not available via web registration.

  9. ISP Non-major Elective

    The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses.

    Permission of Instructor and GPA of 3.0 or higher is required.

    Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; the course is not available via web registration.

  10. Immaterial Mediums

    What makes a digital surface appear sticky? Can a 3d model drip, or ooze? Material behavior and the forces that give material form are intertwined with any architecture or craft based practice. However, 3D models are not tethered to our laws of physics, and the illusion of photorealistic rendering makes it easy to overlook that digital mediums are inherently immaterial and fictional. In this introductory course, we will tackle digital materiality through rendering, physics simulations, and animation. This course does not aim to produce replicas of real-world materials, but to use the lens of material behavior to author new forms of expression. We will treat rendering engines as a pixel generating medium that can articulate properties beyond just color and form. Then we will adopt faux-physics-simulations as a device to squish, dissolve, and expand the 3d model into malleable digital matter. As we progress through workshops in rendering fundamentals and simulating techniques, students will propose hyper-materials imbued with weight, thickness, messiness, and surprise akin to a natural splatter of ink. For the final project, Students will craft their own language of digital mark-making, culminating in a final image or animation.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $50.00

  11. Memory Systems

    Architecture will always be built in place of, (or in addition to) the memory of something or some place that came before. Similarly, our experience, (or perception) of architecture will always be influenced by the memories we carry in our minds. In this class each student will individually answer the question: How can I reconcile this knowledge of memory to inform the design of space? Over six weeks students will have the opportunity to engage memory in the development of a personalized system, (or design process) leading to the final design of a 'memory space'. The first part of this architecture course will engage fundamental design skills used every day by architects through a series of memory exercises. We will hand draw to see our memories, remember through iterative physical study modeling, and contain our memories by way of digital modeling. Part two of this course will see students working toward the final design of a 'memory space'. Building off of part one, fundamental design skills such as hand drawing, physical study modeling and digital modeling will be used again, emphasizing the importance of repetition as a device for memory. This 'memory space' will utilize memory with respect and sensitivity to the memory of a 'place'. Throughout the six weeks of class students will be asked to articulate thoughts and strategies through writing and presenting finished work to the class, helping students test and strengthen their executed ideas. Course reading will help students contextualize memory in cross-disciplinary ways, such as understanding what memory means to a cognitive neuroscientist. By the end of six weeks students will have created a system for designing that can be used and built upon in future design work.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $120.00

  12. Professional Internship

    ARCH-8960 is an optional off campus internship, which may be taken during the summer or in wintersession. Depending on the nature of the work, the internship may count for major elective credit within the department or for non-major elective credit. Total hours required are 180.

  13. Thesis Discursive Workshop

    Thesis Discursive Workshop utilizes Wintersession to hone students' discursive skills, both written and oral, so that they can choreograph a robust discussion around their work. This course establishes a consistent discursive trajectory to the ongoing individual design development of the thesis project that begins in the Fall. In addition to providing a forum in which students might draw out, articulate, and position some of the central claims and aims of their thesis work, this course also aims to instigate careful thought about the written component of the eventual thesis book and the way that this written component might inform or be informed by design work. The assignments of the course are designed to create the infrastructure of a student's eventual thesis book, the elements of any/many book(s). They are not the book content itself, but organize, clarify, define, contextualize, reference, etc. the work contained therein. These elements, for the purposes of this course, are: synopsis (back page/cover flap summary), "cover art", bibliography, table of contents, title, index, and appendix/appendices. In this five-week intensive workshop, students will develop and refine the following skills, relating each development to a component of their eventual book via an assignment:

    1. Crafting the thesis polemic or narrative;

    2. Positioning the thesis;

    3. Contextualizing and formatting the thesis;

    4. Curating and editing the thesis;

    5. Persuasively articulating the thesis.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $50.00 - $200.00

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Permission of Instructor required.

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

    Schedule to be determined with Advisor.

Spring 2020

  1. Advanced Studio

    These studios, three of which are required for graduation, are offered by individual instructors to students who have successfully completed the core curriculum. They are assigned by lottery. Once assigned to an advanced studio, a student may not drop studio.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $50.00 - $200.00

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

    Fee: Some advanced studio sections have a fee for course supplies or field trips. The fee is announced during the registration lottery held in the department.

  2. Advanced Topics In Architectural Computation

    This 3 credit advanced seminar offers students the opportunity to focus on computational topics pertaining to architecture. Computational techniques and computational ideas are explored through making, writing, reading, and discussion. Some of the work in this course will take place in the space of the digital model, but coding, physical computation, and human computation may also enter into play. Students in this course will, under the mentorship of faculty, develop a level of expertise and knowledge that goes beyond what is usually associated with the requisite skills for contemporary architectural practice. Conversely, it is expected that computation may provoke a challenge to even the most base conceptions of design and architecture. Each iteration of this course will identify and advance a single theme, concept or problem. Some issues that may arise during this course include authorship, modeling vs simulation, computer controlled fabrication, intelligence, and creativity. Prerequisite: completion of Architectural Projection or permission of instructor with a demonstrated experience with 2-D and 3-D software.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $20.00 - $100.00

    Major elective

    For Fall and Spring Semesters:

    Restricted to Architecture majors junior and above; open to CTC Concentrators and non-majors pending seat availability and permission of Instructor.

    For Wintersession:

    Open to undergraduate and graduate students.

  3. Advanced Topics In Architectural Theory

    Theory offerings in the architecture department are deliberately consistent or complementary with our pedagogy, born and raised in an arts college. Theory based courses have a basis in empiricism, direct observation and experience of creative processes. Recognizing that discovery and invention often come between existing matrices of thought, offerings may be from disciplines other than architecture or branches of knowledge other than art and design.

    Objectives of the theory component of our curriculum are to:

    1. Expand the capacity to speculate productively.

    2. Develop the skeptic's eye and mind.

    3. Equip the ability to recognize connections that trigger discovery and invention.

    Major elective

    Restricted to Architecture majors junior and above; open to non-majors pending seat availability and permission of Instructor.

  4. Architectural Analysis

    This course will develop one's ability to critically read and understand architecture through formal, geometric, tectonic and spatial analytic processes. Analysis acts as an intermediary between observation, expression, and understanding, offering deep insights into works of architecture. The course builds upon the processes introduced in Architectural Projection. Through various conceptual and representational frameworks, the issues of mapping-layers. Point of view, scale, morphology, topography and tectonics will be explored as part of a larger creative process, embracing visual imagination, communication and critique.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $20.00 - $100.00

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  5. Architectural Design

    Design principles presented in the first semester are further developed through a series of projects involving actual sites with their concomitant physical and historic-cultural conditions. Issues of context, methodology, program and construction are explored for their possible interrelated meanings and influences on the making of architectural form.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $50.00 - $200.00

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  6. Building Prints

    This course brings together printmaking and architecture, with their respective modes of working and sensibilities. There is long tradition connecting the two disciplines; here we will focus on a fundamental, physical connection, experimenting with materials and ways of assembling them to make prints. We will think of the press bed almost as a construction site. Collecting materials from everyday life, we will explore their characteristics and qualities--textures, patterns, opacities and translucencies--in the process of transferring them onto paper. The main technique of the course will be monotype, but we may also employ other techniques, such as soft ground, collagraph, and laser etching depending of students' experience and interest. We will start with simple monochrome prints, progressively moving to more open-ended, elaborate and ambitious experiments, including multicolor prints and three-dimensional assemblages. Students will produce weekly sets of prints exploring themes and variations. Above all, the work of the course should be thought of as an opportunity to develop careful experimental habits.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $60.00

    Elective

    Open to sophomore and above.

    Please follow the below registration availability:

    ARCH-2080: Open to Architecture majors only.

    PRINT-2080: Open to Printmaking majors only.

    IDISC-2080: Open to all other majors.

  7. Concrete Structures

    This course reviews the fundamentals of concrete and masonry in architecture with a focus on materials, structural analysis and design. The analysis and design includes concrete structures, reinforced and pre-stressed concrete members, concrete foundations and reinforced masonry. The student will proportion concrete and masonry structures using ultimate strength design. The longer class time on Tuesday allows students to design, make a concrete mix and create a concrete object. By the end of the course, the students will be able to design and detail simple concrete and masonry systems such as footings, basement walls, beams and slabs; proportion these systems to resist the moment and shear demands determined through structural analysis; develop an understanding of proper detailing of architectural concrete and masonry veneers by understanding thermal movements, waterproofing, and construction techniques.

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  8. Core 2 Studio: Constructions

    The second core studio addresses the agency of the building to simultaneously construct new spatial, social, and material orders in the context of the contemporary city.

    The second core studio situates architecture as the strategic interplay of spatial and constructive concepts towards specific aesthetic, social, and performative ends. The studio seeks to create a productive friction between abstract orders (form, pattern, organization), technical systems (structure, envelope), and the contingencies of real-world conditions (site, politics, environment). The studio operates within a specific cultural framework in which students link disciplinary methods to extra-disciplinary issues, with concentrated forays into the realms of structure, material, environmentalism, and urbanism. Students iteratively develop architectural concepts, ethical positions, and experimental working methods through a series of focused architectural design projects with increasing degrees of complexity, culminating in the design of a mid-scale public building in an urban context.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $195.00

    Graduate major requirement; M.ARCH only.

    Registration by Architecture Department; course not available via web registration.

  9. EHP Sprg:studio Concentratio

    In this intensive independent studio students continue and complete the work began in "EHP Studio Elective", culminating in the final exhibition and review. It corresponds to the remaining eight weeks of the program, after students have finished with their Art History and Italian classes.

    Note: EHP credits replace the on-campus major requirements for the term students attend. Distribution to non-major requirements occurs when major credits are not needed.

  10. EHP Studio Elective

    Independent studio is at the core of the EHP experience. Upon arrival, students are assigned studio space at the Palazzetto Cenci, home of RISD's program in Rome. With guidance from the chief critic, each student develops a personal body of work sparked by his/her interactions with places, people and circumstances in Rome and other locations that are part of the EHP tours (such as the Northern, Southern or Eastern tours, as well as other shorter trips.) The work takes as a point of departure knowledge and techniques specific to individual home departments, but allows, and even encourages, explorations beyond disciplinary boundaries, including collaborations and cross-fertilization within a group of students from different departments working together.

    Beyond consistent and thorough engagement with studio work, requirements include participation in open studios and exhibitions, presentations in reviews, and attendance to all group activities and events, such as lectures at the Cenci and other institutions. From time to time, the chief critic may issue short assignments to introduce or focus on a particular subject. As part of the studio elective, students may be encouraged to keep sketchbooks and/or diaries, participate in optional activities--such as figure drawing sessions--and search for brief internships, apprenticeships, or other forms of interactions with local artists, designers, curators and critics.

    EHP Studio Elective corresponds to the first twelve weeks of the program, while students are also taking Art History and Italian classes. This course establishes the direction for the work in the "Studio Concentration" course that follows.

    Note: EHP credits replace the on-campus major requirements for the term students attend. Distribution to non-major requirements occurs when major credits are not needed.

  11. Environmental Design II

    This equally distributed three part course will continue with the principles from "Physics", the application of electric energy, lighting and sound to building environs. Building technology continues to demand a larger percentage of the building's budget and thus should receive a greater degree of time and understanding by the Architect. Topics and principles to be included are: electronic generation, distribution, and building systems; electronic and communication systems; lighting fundamentals, design and control; and enviro-acoustical fundamentals, sound transmission, amplification, and absorption principles.

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Open to NCSS Concentrators pending seat availability and permission of Instructor.

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  12. Graduate Seminar: Disciplinarity

    Anyone following contemporary debates in architecture knows that there are as many definitions of architecture's disciplinarity as there are people who attempt to define it. In the current spate of publications on this topic, Mark Jarzombek declares architecture to be a failed discipline; Jane Rendell claims that architecture is a 'subject' subsuming several disciplines; Mark Wigley ruminates upon the prosthetic nature of the discipline to the sciences; Bob Somol and Sarah Whiting attempt to recover a Foucaultian disciplinarity in which norms, principles and traditions are supplanted by performative practice; Akos Moravansky argues that the disciplinarity of architecture resists the discursive approach embodied in post-1968 theory; Keller Easterling seeks "the trapdoor into another habit of mind" by eschewing narrow categories of thought for more inclusive ones; Sylvia Lavin uses the analogy of the 'kiss' between an installation and the architecture that houses it as a model of architectural inter-disciplinarity as media interaction; and Hal Foster and Michael Speaks face off on the relative merits of design intelligence and critical distance. How can a student of architecture ever gain a foothold in this complex and confusing debate?

    At stake in the debates over disciplinarity is the question: how can we identify architecture's categories of knowledge, and how did the categorization of knowledge become a priority? This Disciplinarity seminar will historically situate the circumstances of architecture's emerging disciplinarity, and thematize it through three seemingly disparate but operatively identical lenses: the aesthetic, the historic, and the technological. Although the debates cited above appear unruly at first blush, fundamentally they aggregate around the relative merits of defining disciplinary categories of knowledge either too narrowly or too broadly, focusing either on architecture's autonomy or its extra-disciplinary appropriations. In addition to architecture's various categories of knowledge, the seminar will consider the influence of disciplinarity on our practices, considering how various classifications of architectural knowledge affect its techniques, standards, and formats of dissemination. From its Foucaultian framing to its current incarnations, Disciplinarity will unpack the construction of architecture's disciplinarity, and shed some much-needed light on what it means for architects to be disciplinary.

    Major requirement; M.ARCH 3-YR graduate students only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  13. ISP Major

    The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses.

    Register by completing the Independent Study Application available on the Registrar's website; course not available via web registration.

  14. Models

    This course explores multiple forms digital models and their relationships to drawings, materials, and buildings.

    This course uses abstraction as the common thread between its prerequisite, "Drawings," and an inquiry into the elements, natures, structures, and forms of the complex, temporal, cultural, material and political construct often referred to as "the building." The model's role is understood as a medium for operations. The contemporary digital model is delimited and constrained by architectural software. This course recognizes that expertise in multiple digital modeling software-including those aligned with Building Information Modeling (BIM), fabrication, and animation-is as imperative as are skills to manipulate, undermine, link, automate and hack the media that dominate the discipline of architecture. As is the case with "Drawings," models are not merely technical, but the underpinnings of an iterative, creative, synthetic and reflective creative process. A series of prompts engage the computational principles that underpin all digital modeling software. This "under the hood" approach is balanced by "over the hood" approaches that see students designing workflows, automation and output between software and material. The course engages the digital model as sample, system, and database as well as continually interrogates the translational relationship between model and drawing and model and image.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $340.00

    Graduate major requirement; M.ARCH only.

    Registration by Architecture Deparmtent, course not avialable via web registration.

  15. Principles Of Professional Practice

    This is a course about becoming a licensed architect, a business professional and an active, engaged and responsible citizen. It is intended to help prepare students for the challenges and opportunities confronted by a life in Architecture. Lectures are organized around four themes: The architect as a trained and certified "Professional" in traditional and alternative careers; the architect as an operative in the world of business and commerce; the origins of architectural projects; and the detailed work performed through professional Architectural Contracts. Regular panels, composed of RISD alums and other allied professionals provide an external perspective on all elements of the course, and allow students the opportunity to direct discussion in ways appropriate to their needs.

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration

  16. Stuminar: Directed Research Seminar

    The stuminar is, effectively, a seminar congruent with a studio, and its ambition is to provide rigorous methodological framing and provocative content scaffolding for the design research activities within the studio. While the studio component will focus on the advancing of the design research questions framed in the fall seminar, the seminar component will consider the best formats and vehicles for the dissemination of the design research. The deliverables for this stuminar will be twofold: a thoroughly researched, documented, and delineated design project; and a textual 'exit document' in which students articulate their research methods, techniques, formats, and outcomes.

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  17. Stuminar: Directed Research Studio

    The stuminar is, effectively, a studio congruent with a seminar, and its ambition is to provide rigorous methodological framing and provocative content scaffolding for the design research activities within the studio. While the studio component will focus on the advancing of the design research questions framed in the fall seminar, the seminar component will consider the best formats and vehicles for the dissemination of the design research. The deliverables for this stuminar will be twofold: a thoroughly researched, documented, and delineated design project; and a textual 'exit document' in which students articulate their research methods, techniques, formats, and outcomes.

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  18. Thesis Project

    Under the supervision of a faculty advisor, students are responsible for the preparation and completion of an independent thesis project.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $50.00 - $200.00

    Major requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

    Permission for this class is based on the student's overall academic record as well as their performance in Wintersession Thesis Research. If the department recommends against a student undertaking the thesis project, two advanced elective studios must be taken instead.

    Prerequisites: One of the thesis project seminars. See footnotes on the curriculum sheet for a list of these classes or read the course descriptions in the "History and Theory" section which follows.

  19. Urban Farming & Community Engagement

    This 3-credit elective studio seminar fulfills RISD's goal for meaningful community engagement by recognizing the power of affiliating with members of our Providence community on urban agriculture and permaculture initiatives. The course seeks to introduce the history of organic farming and explore the developments in contemporary urban practices. Students will acquire an understanding of the topic through field demonstrations and case study analysis which will lead up to work on a small-scale design build initiative for a community garden with a local partner.

    Social justice extends to the environmental issues in multiple ways. Providence, Rhode Island, is made up of diverse communities where, in 2015, more than 1 in 5 children in Providence have grown up in poverty, with a medium household income of $34,000 or less. There are many local non-profits that serve our communities including with urban farming activities that provide fresh food and places to gather. Urban agriculture has the potential to strengthen local communities and has many social benefits including economic development through food production and other activities in the food network, reducing food deserts, enhancing food security, the reduction of the use of fossil-fuels, and the transformation of urban environments through the introduction of the green spaces that highlight the nutrient cycle. Urban farming creates more sustainable urban environments by re-establishing interrelated natural systems, promoting biodiversity and reducing urban impact on the water cycle. Finally, these spaces can become a locus for community where youth and adults can engage natural systems though passive or active undertakings and educational uses.

    Academia has an important role to play in advancing these community efforts. We will look at appropriate methods of community engagement and Creative Placemaking to explore how design can play a role in nurturing culturally-diverse vibrant neighborhoods while creating positive change. We will work closely with local community partners, such as the FarmFresh RI, Southside Community Land Trust and the African Alliance of RI to understand and support their work through creative thinking.

    Each student will be asked to prepare two projects. The first will be a case study analysis of existing examples of urban farms across the country to learn from the unique ways people are farming in different cities. In the second project, we will work with our community partners in the field to design and build a small project that will be part of an existing garden. Finally, we will document the process that emerges through community conversations in order to share our process and results.

    At the end of the semester students will be required to participate in two build sessions outside of class period at the project site as part of course work.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $30.00

    Open to juniors and above.

    Please follow the below registration availability:

    INTAR-2340: Open to Interior Architecture majors only.

    ARCH-2340: Open to Architecture majors only.

    LDAR-2340: Open to Landscape Architecture majors only.

    IDISC-2340: Open to all other majors.

  20. Women In Archiecture

    How have female architects outside of the United States impacted their societies? And, what do these architects' accomplishments and the challenges they face reveal about the intersections of architecture, sexism, racism, colonization, and globalization?

    These thematic questions will guide students through the case studies of 13 female, non-American, mostly non-white architects. Weekly readings will offer in depth study of well-known figures, such as Lina Bo Bardi, and significant, but lesser known architects such as Nadia Tromp, the managing director of Ntsika Architects, a 100% black, female-owned practice in South Africa. Students will conclude the course by writing a term paper on contemporary female architecture.

    Estimated Materials Cost: $50.00

    Open to undergraduate and graduate students.

  21. Wood Structures

    This course will review the fundamentals of wood in architecture with a focus on wood materials and construction systems and lumber and timber structural analysis and design. Work includes timber systems consisting of conventional framing trusses, laminates, built-up sections and connections. In addition, this course will review the principles of structural loads; gravity, lateral, live and dead. The concept of lateral resistance through standard wood framing systems will be explored. Manufactured lumber has become a major part of today's wood construction industry and the design and detailing of these materials will be explored in depth. By the end of the course, students will be aware of the role of wood materials in architectural design and construction and be able to design and detail simple Lumber and Timber structural systems. They will be able to proportion these systems to resist the moment and shear demands determined through structural analysis. This course will provide the student with a good understanding of the material and the common structural and architectural systems used in today's practice.

    Major Requirement; Architecture majors only

    Registration by the Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.

  22. World Architecture: From Pre-history To Pre-modern: Ideas and Artifacts

    This history of architecture course, co-taught by an architectural historian and an architect, introduces key ideas, forces, and techniques that have shaped world architecture through the ages prior to the modern period. The course is based on critical categories, ranging from indigenous and vernacular architecture, to technology, culture, and representation. The lectures and discussions present systems of thought, practice and organization, emphasizing both historical and global interconnectedness, and critical architectural differences and anomalies. Each topic will be presented through case studies accompanied by relevant texts. The students will be expected to engage in the discussion groups, prepare material for these discussions, write about, and be examined on the topics.

    Major requirement; Architecture majors

    Art History credit for Architecture majors

    Liberal Arts elective credit for non-majors pending seat availability and permission of Instructor.

    Registration by Architecture Department, course not available via web registration.